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Ronald Kuetemeier
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Math is not my God. Math is just culture.
Math is not my God. Math is just culture.

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Mental Block: Professor Discovers Way to Alter Memory

A series of studies conducted by an Iowa State University research team shows that it is possible to manipulate an existing memory simply by suggesting new or different information. The key is timing and recall of that memory, said Jason Chan, an assistant professor of psychology at Iowa State.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130604134251.htm

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Now we just need math which creates and [re]orders sequences naturally:-).  


Human language, as well as birdsong, relies on the ability to arrange vocal elements in new sequences. However, little is known about the ontogenetic origin of this capacity. Here we track the development of vocal combinatorial capacity in three species of vocal learners, combining an experimental approach in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with an analysis of natural development of vocal transitions in Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata domestica) and pre-lingual human infants.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-similarities-birds-babies.html#jCp

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The flexible neurons also greatly expand the brain's capacity to perform tasks. In the computer model, neural networks without mixed selectivity neurons could learn about 100 tasks before running out of capacity. That capacity greatly expanded to tens of millions of tasks as mixed selectivity neurons were added to the model. When mixed selectivity neurons reached about 30 percent of the total, the network's capacity became "virtually unlimited," Miller says—just like a human brain.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-neurons-multitask-greatly-brain-power.html#jCp

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If one uses differential timing, then this is a fallout:
"The scientists argue that many of our high-level abilities are carried out by more extensive brain networks linking many different areas of the brain. They suggest it may be the structure of these extended networks more than the size of any isolated brain region that is critical for cognitive functioning."

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-human-brain-frontal-lobes-large.html#jCp

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Is it insert/delete or reordering with new meaning (path through data ….takes time):

“Thus the sentence, "Onto the cat jumped a table," which might seem to make no sense, can be made plausible with two changes—one deletion and one insertion—so that it reads, "The cat jumped onto a table." And yet, almost all the time, people will not infer that those changes are needed, and assume the literal, surreal meaning is the one intended.”[1]

With differential timing one has to take reordering and priming into account, natural learned sequence.  Also 2 or more insert/ delete/reordering in a massive parallel system which tests on meaning (here multiple path) take time(ttl) to resolve.  What we hear/see is not immutable or static sequences.  Hence 13 and 1E(mirror 3) make sense to a child learning to write numbers, it’s pretty much the same “problem” just on a smaller scale.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-decoding-noisy-language-daily-life.html#jCp

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Differentials just thrive on this sort of thing:

Asymmetry of human brain enhances cognition compared to other primates
http://phys.org/news/2013-04-asymmetry-human-brain-cognition-primates.html

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So we learn numbers[1,2], no surprise here.  The question is how? We have the uncanny ability to go from imprecise to precise and back or from aggregate to specific and back.  
In early learning numbers one might switch between 13 and 1E (mirror 3). The meaning might be the same, the precision in writing is still not there and is lost to the visual system(feedback), both will be read out loud as thirteen.  In other words the sense of a number is independent of representation during learning.  The question to me is:  Are we learning to go from imprecise “all” to specific or are we computing from specific “true” to aggregate? 

1. Scientists Pinpoint Brain's Area for Numeral Recognition
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416180022.htm
2. Study Finds Twist to the Story of the Number Line: Number Line Is Learned, Not Innate Human Intuition
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120425192742.htm

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