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Stanford Social Innovation Review
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Informing and Inspiring Leaders of Social Change
Informing and Inspiring Leaders of Social Change

2,441 followers
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Stanford Social Innovation Review's posts

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LAST CHANCE: The Giving Code SSIR Webinar Series, Part 1 is tomorrow! Register now: http://bit.ly/ChangingLandscape

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New research has uncovered a growing disconnect between donors and community-based nonprofits. Join Part 1 of the SSIR Live! webinar series, The Giving Code, on February 28 to learn how this trend can affect you. Register now: http://bit.ly/ChangingLandscape
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Despite the importance of human services and other nonprofits to employees and those they serve, many nonprofit workers do not earn a living wage. We can do better.

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For solutions to get to scale, we need strong entrepreneurs who can build on existing breakthrough ideas, rather than creating entirely new ones.

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Impact investing strategies often focus on returns, but one family foundation’s sights are set on building human capacity, collaboration, and diversity in the field.

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The social sector needs to take greater advantage of the behavioral sciences when developing programs and services - thoughts from Eric Nee, Managing Editor of SSIR.

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Five successful change management strategies from an initiative to transform higher education.

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India’s social sector works in an environment where the magnitude of need and scarcity of resources create a crucible of innovation that can produce insights for the world. In light of this, the second annual issue of Impact India (produced by The Bridgespan Group, Dasra, and Stanford Social Innovation Review) examines how successful Indian nonprofits have become masters at scaling up.

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This special supplement examines the different ways that social innovation is evolving in China, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Japan, as a result of each country’s unique history, culture, and political-economic system.

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The Spring 2017 Issue is now live! Check out the latest edition of SSIR.
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