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Ted Gore
2,189 followers -
Landscape photographer in the Los Angeles area.
Landscape photographer in the Los Angeles area.

2,189 followers
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Ted's posts

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Wai'ale'ale's Sorrow

During my visit last year to Kauai, I had my eyes set on getting to a special area of the island that is sometimes referred to as the 'Blue Hole'. Well, I never made it. The blue hole is the base of Wai'ale'ale mountain, which you see in the distance in this image, with the water pouring down the craters sides, also known as the Wall of Tears. After a several miles of off-roading down a road my rental jeep had no business being on(don't tell on me!), I found myself at a water diversion(actually seen in the movie Jurassic Park), and a stream leading up towards the crater walls. It was several miles to the actual back of the wall, So I started a journey up the stream to see what I could find. The 'trail' was a bit of a joke, as I continually lost it and got dumped back out into the stream. Eventually I gave up and spent most of the time walking up the stream itself, trying my best to keep my footing and not slip, fall, and put myself in a bad situation. At this point, I was miles from anyone, and highly doubtful that anyone would come by if something were to happen. Mix that with all of the continuous warnings of flash flooding on the island, and I was left with a sense of urgency to get in, get a shot, and get out. As the tour helicopters buzzed in and out of the hole, rotating the paying customers through like a conveyer belt, I trudged up the stream. It's a jaw dropping place. Even on the drive in there are several spots where you turn a bend, and the view opens up to the wall. Breathtaking for sure, and that continued as I made my way up, getting closer, and seeing the falls clearer. I found myself whispering 'wow' plenty. Eventually I came upon this scene and tried to capture the sense of being there as best I could. The clouds moved through above, but luckily there were some breaks from time to time, causing dappled light on the wall. That, the falls, some african tulips, and the gurgle of the stream flowing out of the crater made for special moment for me. Going much further than this proved to be a pretty monumental task, as you have to scale some waterfalls, and maneuver even more difficult terrain. I checked my ego 'at the door', and retreated to my waiting car. Maybe during another trip!
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Meissner's Dream

A re-edit of an old shot I took at Crater lake during the summer of 2013. Some forest fires had been burning recently, and a haze of fire smoke lingered on the horizon. When the sun rose that day, the light was being filtered by the thick smoke and instead of a searing, bright ball of light that was painful to look at, it... wasn't. You could just look right at it. It felt... odd. Wrong, almost. I'm looking at you, sun... right at you. You should be hurting my eyeballs, searing my rods and cones, and I should be looking away in pain, left with a big green dot in my sight as a reminder for the next 5-10 minutes that laying my eyes upon you is forbidden! But today you let down your guard and let me see you for who you really are. Something my mom told me never to do. You're really nice, and you mean well deep down inside. I like that about you. Thank you, Sun!
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Naupaka's Journey

In may of 2014 I spent a total 19 days perusing the island of Kauai. This is my first shot of several from that trip. The Napali coast is one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen in my life. It is just jaw dropping. Sheer cliffs rise straight of the ocean for thousands of feet, with a multitude of canyons and fins, covered in bright green vegetation, rainbows all over the place. Yes, unicorns even! Just hard to believe until you see it yourself. It is difficult to access however. I spent three days kayaking up the coastline, camping at a beach along the way, and then also made the 11 mile hike out to this particular area, called Kalalau Beach, for a couple nights. The place is not only an experience just for the amazing display of nature here, but it's also a pretty interesting cultural experience. It's a bit hippy town there, with these people who have shunned society to live out there days as unproductive citizens of the world, gallivanting around naked(some pretty attractive women, I might add) in paradise rather than contributing to anything worthwhile. Do I sound bitter? Yeah, a little... because they commandeer all of the really great ocean view campsites, illegally. I paid $40 for permits for two nights and all I could find was a spot way back in the forest. Pshhht. But, they are really nice, so whatever. 

This is the only shot I was able to get from this area. It actually is not that conducive to good photography, as most of the shore line here has you very close to the cliffs with no option to move further away, which is why most shots you see of this coast line are from boats or helicopters. There is this peninsula which allows you to get further away, and I was able to find this really nice carpet of beach naupaka, with one branch breaking from the pack, setting out on it's own journey. The little half flowers have a legend behind them according to the Hawaiian natives. It varies from source to source, but the same message is present in all, lovers that are separated forever, one banished to the mountains, the other to the beach. Perhaps these few are setting off on a journey back to the mountains to find their missing half?
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Something a bit out of the norm for me. I will admit, I'm a sucker for dramatic, edge of the day light, and it is what I prefer to shoot, but on this day, I didn't have the choice. The lake was an eery kind of still that day, and luckily, I spotted this particularly shapely sand bar waiting for me. I've seen other shots from this area, but never a sand bar with as much character as this one. I've been back to the lake since, and sadly, the lake levels have dropped to the point that this area no longer has water in it(or maybe lucky for me). I would have preferred a shot of this with some nice sunset light and clouds, but that wasn't in the cards for me. I had set up a little before sunset and starting shooting, before the light started to change color, because by the time it did, the wind began to pick up and completely chopped up the lake. For me, it was pointless to try and shoot after that, so I packed it up thinking I had lost the opportunity. I pulled the file out recently, took a deep breath, mustered up some courage, and decided to give a blue sky/white cloud shot a good effort... the comp was just too interesting for me to pass up, and leave sitting on my hard drive for eternity. I'm happy with the result, and happy to have something that I think is fairly unique. 
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The Lake's Whisper

Mist lingers on the surface of Sparks lake in central oregon. 

I had packed up my gear after a perfect sunrise shoot, and was leaving the shore area when I happened to glance in the direction across the lake. The potential for this shot struck me, but in typical Ted Gore fashion, I doubted. Doubted it would make a good shot, and almost kept walking, eager to get back to my car, and that yum yum gimme some cereal with cold almond milk(so much better than cows milk! I'm a bit of a health nut). BUT... I stopped. What the heck, I'll take it, might be nothin, but who knows, at least I'll have it(that's the better way to think, right?). Threw my pack down(I'm a liar, I gently placed it on the ground to, one, protect my valuable gear, and, two, decrease the chance of my bag getting yuck dirt embedded into it's fabrics which would then later on be deposited into my car.)

Where was I.

Oh yeah. I took the picture. And this is it. 

I'd say it was worth the extra, oh I dunno, 43 seconds it took for me to stop and take it?

Unfortunately there is a sad element to this story and image. The dead trees are a result of them being killed by an invasive species of beetle that the tree can't defend itself against. A result of humans impact on this planet. Kills me.
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 This is a shot of a pretty awesome looking sea stack on Rialto Beach on the Olympic Coast in Washington. While visiting, I found myself at this spot watching how the water receded over the sand and rocks, creating these really interesting lines. Well, I did not literally see lines... what I saw was the pieces of foam going up and down the beach, but I knew, that with a long exposure, they would most likely look interesting. And they did! The moon was in a good spot, and the clouds were forming some radiating lines that I thought would make a pretty cool shot. I chose to go vertical pano style because a more conventional vertical ratio caused the singular, tall, thin stack to look too insignificant.

Find more of my work, and information about workshops and online instruction for processing at www.tedgorecreative.com
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WORKSHOP ANNOUNCEMENT

I would like to announce a workshop I will be conducting along with Photographer extraordinaire, TJ Thorne, that we will be conducting in the Columbia River Gorge. Join TJ and I for 5 days of exploring the gorge, visiting the most beautiful waterfalls in the country, along with other amazing landscape photography locations in and around the Gorge. This workshop will not only focus on accessing the best photographic locations in the area, but will also put a large emphasis on in-field technique and processing. The workshop will be occurring on May 4th through the 8th. 

You can find all the information on this page: http://www.tedgorecreative.com/waterfallworkshop

I have another workshop announcement coming soon, so stay tuned!

This is an image of Pony Tail falls I shot last may. I'm dedicating it to Rob Lafreniere because the day before I shot this, my camera lost it's life to water damage during a particularly wet day in the gorge. Rob was generous enough to let me use his spare camera. So thanks Rob!
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Eerie Descent

Each image I process has it's own set of unique challenges I have to face and overcome, this one was no picnic. Shot mid-day in the Canadian rockies during peak larch color, maybe only an hour after my other shot from Moraine Lake which is up behind these mountains somewhere. Some storm clouds were passing through the area, and the sun was peaking through scattered breaks in the clouds, casting rays all over the place. It was quite awesome to watch, and I caught this one scene from the side of a mountain on the other side of the valley when I noticed an iridescent cloud being lit up by a narrow beam of light that had found it's way through. Really cool little moment. The challenge was that the air was so full of moisture that the shot was just haze for days. Mucho work bringing out the clarity and getting even contrast through out.

Find me on www.facebook.com/tedgorephotography
 
Interested in learning how I process? Get more info at my website www.tedgorecreative.com/instruction/
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Morning Brush

Sunrise light just begins to light the peaks of the Eastern Sierra. Owens valley comes alive with color in the winter, oddly enough. Braving the bitter cold on a still morning in the Owens Valley is one of my favorite feelings. While this may be a more painterly, embellished representation of it, it really is a sight to behold. I'm really fond of the aqua green of the sage brush, and the pungent reds of the red willow. Seeing this area in the summer, is not as impressive, in my opinion. Too much green that's hiding all the color! This is one of my very first images I took after I got serious about shooting landscape photography, and is still one of my favorites. I wanted to refresh it. And it was a real chore. Processing an image with so many minute details is laborious, and I'm glad to finally have something I'm happy with. I've revisited this location on a few occasions, and sadly, the perfect arrangement of twigs, branches and brush is no more. I'm glad to have captured it when I did. 

Some links, if you care to find me elsewhere:
https://www.facebook.com/tedgorephotography
https://www.flickr.com/photos/106779677@N08/
https://500px.com/TedGore

And if you are interested in learning more about my processing, information here. http://www.tedgorecreative.com/instruction/
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Clouds Too Thick

One day back in march of this year I found myself in a 4runner with David Thompson and Paul Rojas bouncing around down a remote dirt road in death valley national park. With proper 4wd, the amount of access to remote sections of the park offers so many options, and after a fair amount of convincing, Paul agreed to heading into a rarely visited valley where we knew we might find something interesting. There had been a lot of weather moving through the area shortly before, and how passable the road was, was a concern. The trip was white knuckled for all three of us, and I'm sure more so for Paul, who was driving. Slippery mud along stretches of road with sheer drop offs to one side. Fallen rocks littering the road that required david and I to get out and move them so we could pass. It was fun... after we eluded death, and got to where we were going of course. 

We scouted, found this place, got stoked, shot sunset, which didn't result in anything worthwhile, and turned in, with hopes for an epic morning. David, being the smart man he is, decided to not bring a sleeping bag or tent on this trip, so he ended up TRYING to sleep in the 4 runner... with little success. I rose before dawn, ready to trek back out to our spot, to find a Mr. Grumpy pants Thompson, grumbling, 'Clouds too thick', which to this day still makes me laugh. He was hell bent on believing our endeavors were made in futility. Well, to his credit, they were pretty thick... I understood, sleep deprivation is a bitch! We went anyway. Lucky for us, the sun broke through at one point and shined this thin band of awesomeness on the mountain. We were all happy. Only obstacle left? Getting out safe. I enjoyed another moment of comedic relief when I found David and Paul sitting in the front seat of the 4runner, huddled over the operation manual, reading about 4wd and how it works. Haha, a little late for that, dudes! I'm not sure what they were hoping to find, I mean, we made it out there ok! I wasn't worried, but they seemed a little on edge. Ok I was a little worried, that road was pretty sketch in spots. We made it ok, NICE DRIVING PAUL!

Anyway, here's my shot from the morning. I loved the geometric shape and arrangement of the tiles, which where probably 3 inches thick. Really pretty fascinating to see.

https://www.facebook.com/tedgorephotography
http://500px.com/TedGore
www.tedgorecreative.com/instruction/
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