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Jan Košir
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Some time ago, I started experimenting with home-made developers, namely #caffenol and got hooked.
I love the look of the images and the toxicity of the developer in comparison to other, commercial, developers. Also a nice feature is that I can have different exposures (well, up to a limit) on the same negative and all get developed nicely.

But not all was well at first. Before #caffenol, I did develop quite a few films using commercial developers, but never did I put myself into the process, never did I understand the whys, just the hows. It made for quite a thorny path, filled with confusion and quite a few underdeveloped films.
Unfortunately, my first negatives (even more unfortunate, quite a few of them), were far from impressive, more than not disappointing, than I initially expected. They were really stained, which was quite obvious on any dark/black area (see the first picture), and it took quite a bit of effort and playing around with contrast&co. to get at least a usable picture (see the second picture). I spent a few months (truth be told, I didn't quite spend 24/7 in the darkroom for those months, but from my perspective, it did amount to quite considerable lengths of time) working in the darkroom, experimenting with the recipes (a good weight scale, accurate to ~0.1g - only small amounts of KBr are needed, so a scale has to be accurate - is invaluable and when starting out, a ph meter is quite useful as well - unless you are willing to bake your washing soda to find out how much water it contains), adding more of some checmicals, sometimes detracting others (mostly just increasing quantitites), but never did the negatives get significantly better, only midly improving, if at all.
But one day, a friend was helping (watching) me mix the chemicals (not much changed from the original recipe) and then while I was diluting the developer, before putting it all in the tank, he asked me a very good question, "why are you adding more water?". My biggest mistake was, I never understood, why I added water when e.g. using Ilford DD-X. While some developers, like DD-X need to be diluted with water, #caffenol does not. After this (finally not drowning the developer in water), "strangely" my negatives came out alright. I still had to experiment after that quite a bit (mostly wrt development time vs film & exposure combination), but everything after all of this was nitpicking, searching for the right combination, that makes the developed pictures look best to me.
Currently the recipe I'm using is Caffenol-C-L from http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2010/08/recipes.html with 1.1g KBr/l and agitation as per http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2011/04/next-new-film-rollei-rpx-100.html

I still have a lot ahead of me (getting that perfect combination of time vs film vs agitation vs KBr), but a lot is stil waiting out there (like the new Caffenol-C-F recipe).

Note: yes, the smell is quite powerful at first, but don't worry, you get used to it and start loving it fairly quickly :)

Recipes, inspiration and lots of knowledge were provided by:
- http://caffenol.blogspot.com/ (don't forget to read the comments from the posts, they can contain quite enlightening info)
- http://www.caffenol.org/
- http://www.flickr.com/groups/caffinol_private_palace/
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2013-07-12
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Post has shared content
Some time ago, I started experimenting with home-made developers, namely #caffenol and got hooked.
I love the look of the images and the toxicity of the developer in comparison to other, commercial, developers. Also a nice feature is that I can have different exposures (well, up to a limit) on the same negative and all get developed nicely.

But not all was well at first. Before #caffenol, I did develop quite a few films using commercial developers, but never did I put myself into the process, never did I understand the whys, just the hows. It made for quite a thorny path, filled with confusion and quite a few underdeveloped films.
Unfortunately, my first negatives (even more unfortunate, quite a few of them), were far from impressive, more than not disappointing, than I initially expected. They were really stained, which was quite obvious on any dark/black area (see the first picture), and it took quite a bit of effort and playing around with contrast&co. to get at least a usable picture (see the second picture). I spent a few months (truth be told, I didn't quite spend 24/7 in the darkroom for those months, but from my perspective, it did amount to quite considerable lengths of time) working in the darkroom, experimenting with the recipes (a good weight scale, accurate to ~0.1g - only small amounts of KBr are needed, so a scale has to be accurate - is invaluable and when starting out, a ph meter is quite useful as well - unless you are willing to bake your washing soda to find out how much water it contains), adding more of some checmicals, sometimes detracting others (mostly just increasing quantitites), but never did the negatives get significantly better, only midly improving, if at all.
But one day, a friend was helping (watching) me mix the chemicals (not much changed from the original recipe) and then while I was diluting the developer, before putting it all in the tank, he asked me a very good question, "why are you adding more water?". My biggest mistake was, I never understood, why I added water when e.g. using Ilford DD-X. While some developers, like DD-X need to be diluted with water, #caffenol does not. After this (finally not drowning the developer in water), "strangely" my negatives came out alright. I still had to experiment after that quite a bit (mostly wrt development time vs film & exposure combination), but everything after all of this was nitpicking, searching for the right combination, that makes the developed pictures look best to me.
Currently the recipe I'm using is Caffenol-C-L from http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2010/08/recipes.html with 1.1g KBr/l and agitation as per http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2011/04/next-new-film-rollei-rpx-100.html

I still have a lot ahead of me (getting that perfect combination of time vs film vs agitation vs KBr), but a lot is stil waiting out there (like the new Caffenol-C-F recipe).

Note: yes, the smell is quite powerful at first, but don't worry, you get used to it and start loving it fairly quickly :)

Recipes, inspiration and lots of knowledge were provided by:
- http://caffenol.blogspot.com/ (don't forget to read the comments from the posts, they can contain quite enlightening info)
- http://www.caffenol.org/
- http://www.flickr.com/groups/caffinol_private_palace/
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2013-07-12
3 Photos - View album

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Some time ago, I started experimenting with home-made developers, namely #caffenol and got hooked.
I love the look of the images and the toxicity of the developer in comparison to other, commercial, developers. Also a nice feature is that I can have different exposures (well, up to a limit) on the same negative and all get developed nicely.

But not all was well at first. Before #caffenol, I did develop quite a few films using commercial developers, but never did I put myself into the process, never did I understand the whys, just the hows. It made for quite a thorny path, filled with confusion and quite a few underdeveloped films.
Unfortunately, my first negatives (even more unfortunate, quite a few of them), were far from impressive, more than not disappointing, than I initially expected. They were really stained, which was quite obvious on any dark/black area (see the first picture), and it took quite a bit of effort and playing around with contrast&co. to get at least a usable picture (see the second picture). I spent a few months (truth be told, I didn't quite spend 24/7 in the darkroom for those months, but from my perspective, it did amount to quite considerable lengths of time) working in the darkroom, experimenting with the recipes (a good weight scale, accurate to ~0.1g - only small amounts of KBr are needed, so a scale has to be accurate - is invaluable and when starting out, a ph meter is quite useful as well - unless you are willing to bake your washing soda to find out how much water it contains), adding more of some checmicals, sometimes detracting others (mostly just increasing quantitites), but never did the negatives get significantly better, only midly improving, if at all.
But one day, a friend was helping (watching) me mix the chemicals (not much changed from the original recipe) and then while I was diluting the developer, before putting it all in the tank, he asked me a very good question, "why are you adding more water?". My biggest mistake was, I never understood, why I added water when e.g. using Ilford DD-X. While some developers, like DD-X need to be diluted with water, #caffenol does not. After this (finally not drowning the developer in water), "strangely" my negatives came out alright. I still had to experiment after that quite a bit (mostly wrt development time vs film & exposure combination), but everything after all of this was nitpicking, searching for the right combination, that makes the developed pictures look best to me.
Currently the recipe I'm using is Caffenol-C-L from http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2010/08/recipes.html with 1.1g KBr/l and agitation as per http://caffenol.blogspot.com/2011/04/next-new-film-rollei-rpx-100.html

I still have a lot ahead of me (getting that perfect combination of time vs film vs agitation vs KBr), but a lot is stil waiting out there (like the new Caffenol-C-F recipe).

Note: yes, the smell is quite powerful at first, but don't worry, you get used to it and start loving it fairly quickly :)

Recipes, inspiration and lots of knowledge were provided by:
- http://caffenol.blogspot.com/ (don't forget to read the comments from the posts, they can contain quite enlightening info)
- http://www.caffenol.org/
- http://www.flickr.com/groups/caffinol_private_palace/
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2013-07-12
3 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Not long ago I got my hands on a #Blackberry dev alpha B device through http://www.madewithmarmalade.com/BlackBerry .

As part of this competition I managed to create my first blackberry appworld submission, Twisted4InARow ( http://appworld.blackberry.com/webstore/content/29618900/ ).

I had had some problems setting up the framework, but in the end, I managed. Lua interested me for quite a while now and this was a good excuse to finally dvelve into it. Even though I did encounter a few problems (there were some situations where the physics engine was giving me some grief, was unable to set up proper debugging), I have to admit that in the end, as far as simple game development is concerned, it ain't that bad.
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