Profile cover photo
Profile photo
nemesis maturity
14,692 followers
14,692 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Top 7 Must-See Sky Events For 2019

2018 was an exciting year for avid stargazers. In retrospective summary, it began with the Super Blood Moon and ended with the passing of Comet 46P/Wirtanen. The stargazing events in 2019 could be as wonderful as the last.

In January this year, a Super Blue Blood Moon rose across the sky, stunning stargazers around the world. Next year is set to be another year filled with astronomical events.

Super Blood Moon Eclipse
On January 20 and 21, a Super Blood Moon will rise across the winter skies.
This sees a Super Moon, Blood Moon and the January Wolf Moon all coincide to create the phenomenal event.

January’s full Moon is known as a Wolf Moon due to in Native American times, wolves would appear outside villages and howl in hunger at the Moon.
A Blood Moon is when the Moon takes a reddish hue, as it refracts light only in the red spectrum.

Venus and Jupiter Conjunction
The day after the Super Blood Wolf Moon, on January 22 a beautiful conjunction of two planets will take place. Venus and Jupiter will be just 2.4 degrees apart in the eastern sky during pre-dawn. There is another chance this could happen later in the year on November 24, when the planets may be even closer - just 1.4 degrees apart after sunset.

Blue Moon
Ther is a Blue Moon on May 2019. The May 18, full moon is a Blue Moon according to an older definition of the term. It’s a seasonal Blue Moon: the third of four full moons to occur in a single season. A Blue Moon by this definition only comes 7 times in 19 calendar years.

Total Solar Eclipse
In July, a rare total eclipse will take place. This total solar eclipse will be visible from small parts of Chile and Argentina just before sunset. Some regions in the Pacific and in South America, including locations in Ecuador, Brazil, Uruguay, and Paraguay will see a partial solar eclipse, if the weather permits.

Those in the areas it is visible can witness it on July 2, 2019, but remember to wear eye protection as the sun's rays can damage your eyes.

Black Moon Rising
There are many intriguing Moons, the Full Moon, the Supermoon, the Blue Moon, the Blood Moon, the Pink Moon and so many more. None, however, are as intriguing, or mysterious as the Black Moon. This rare Moon occurs just once every 32 months, and is set to rise on July 2019.

The Black Moon refers to the second New Moon within a month. And while the Moon itself will be pretty much invisible, it will, nonetheless, provide an incredible opportunity for stargazing since there will be a whole lot of darkness in the night sky.

Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun
Towards the end of the year on November 11, the last Transit of Mercury until 2032 will occur. This is where the disk of Mercury appears to cross the disk of the Sun as seen from Earth. It will be best seen from the eastern US, Central America and South America. This is an event that only happens 13 times per century and will next take place on November 13, 2032.

A Spectacular ‘Ring of Fire’ Eclipse
On December 26, a rare Annular Solar Eclipse will take place, known as a Ring of Fire eclipse. This event is when the Moon is a micro Moon, the furthest away from Earth it could possibly be - opposite to a supermoon.

This means that during the eclipse a ring appears around the Moon, as the Sun’s rays peek around the smaller Moon. As this is a solar eclipse, to observe it you will have to wear safety glasses or else risk damaging your eyes.

Clear Skies Everyone!

https://earthsky.org/tonight/supermoon-lunar-eclipse-january-20-21
https://earthsky.org/tonight/venus-jupiter-conjunction-on-january-22
https://telescopicwatch.com/must-see-stargazing-events/
https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1054203/Super-blood-moon-2019-when-is-next-total-lunar-eclipse-blood-moon-supermoon

Clips images credit: ESA/HUBBLE, ESO, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Dennis L. Mammana (TWAN)

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Top 7 Must-See Sky Events For 2019

2018 was an exciting year for avid stargazers. In retrospective summary, it began with the Super Blood Moon and ended with the passing of Comet 46P/Wirtanen. The stargazing events in 2019 could be as wonderful as the last.

In January this year, a Super Blue Blood Moon rose across the sky, stunning stargazers around the world. Next year is set to be another year filled with astronomical events.

Super Blood Moon Eclipse
On January 20 and 21, a Super Blood Moon will rise across the winter skies.
This sees a Super Moon, Blood Moon and the January Wolf Moon all coincide to create the phenomenal event.

January’s full Moon is known as a Wolf Moon due to in Native American times, wolves would appear outside villages and howl in hunger at the Moon.
A Blood Moon is when the Moon takes a reddish hue, as it refracts light only in the red spectrum.

Venus and Jupiter Conjunction
The day after the Super Blood Wolf Moon, on January 22 a beautiful conjunction of two planets will take place. Venus and Jupiter will be just 2.4 degrees apart in the eastern sky during pre-dawn. There is another chance this could happen later in the year on November 24, when the planets may be even closer - just 1.4 degrees apart after sunset.

Blue Moon
Ther is a Blue Moon on May 2019. The May 18, full moon is a Blue Moon according to an older definition of the term. It’s a seasonal Blue Moon: the third of four full moons to occur in a single season. A Blue Moon by this definition only comes 7 times in 19 calendar years.

Total Solar Eclipse
In July, a rare total eclipse will take place. This total solar eclipse will be visible from small parts of Chile and Argentina just before sunset. Some regions in the Pacific and in South America, including locations in Ecuador, Brazil, Uruguay, and Paraguay will see a partial solar eclipse, if the weather permits.

Those in the areas it is visible can witness it on July 2, 2019, but remember to wear eye protection as the sun's rays can damage your eyes.

Black Moon Rising
There are many intriguing Moons, the Full Moon, the Supermoon, the Blue Moon, the Blood Moon, the Pink Moon and so many more. None, however, are as intriguing, or mysterious as the Black Moon. This rare Moon occurs just once every 32 months, and is set to rise on July 2019.

The Black Moon refers to the second New Moon within a month. And while the Moon itself will be pretty much invisible, it will, nonetheless, provide an incredible opportunity for stargazing since there will be a whole lot of darkness in the night sky.

Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun
Towards the end of the year on November 11, the last Transit of Mercury until 2032 will occur. This is where the disk of Mercury appears to cross the disk of the Sun as seen from Earth. It will be best seen from the eastern US, Central America and South America. This is an event that only happens 13 times per century and will next take place on November 13, 2032.

A Spectacular ‘Ring of Fire’ Eclipse
On December 26, a rare Annular Solar Eclipse will take place, known as a Ring of Fire eclipse. This event is when the Moon is a micro Moon, the furthest away from Earth it could possibly be - opposite to a supermoon.

This means that during the eclipse a ring appears around the Moon, as the Sun’s rays peek around the smaller Moon. As this is a solar eclipse, to observe it you will have to wear safety glasses or else risk damaging your eyes.

https://earthsky.org/tonight/supermoon-lunar-eclipse-january-20-21
https://earthsky.org/tonight/venus-jupiter-conjunction-on-january-22
https://telescopicwatch.com/must-see-stargazing-events/
https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1054203/Super-blood-moon-2019-when-is-next-total-lunar-eclipse-blood-moon-supermoon

Clips images credit: ESA/HUBBLE, ESO, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Dennis L. Mammana (TWAN)

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Top 7 Must-See Sky Events For 2019

2018 was an exciting year for avid stargazers. In retrospective summary, it began with the Super Blood Moon and ended with the passing of Comet 46P/Wirtanen. The stargazing events in 2019 could be as wonderful as the last.

In January this year, a Super Blue Blood Moon rose across the sky, stunning stargazers around the world. Next year is set to be another year filled with astronomical events.

Super Blood Moon Eclipse
On January 20 and 21, a Super Blood Moon will rise across the winter skies.
This sees a Super Moon, Blood Moon and the January Wolf Moon all coincide to create the phenomenal event.

January’s full Moon is known as a Wolf Moon due to in Native American times, wolves would appear outside villages and howl in hunger at the Moon.
A Blood Moon is when the Moon takes a reddish hue, as it refracts light only in the red spectrum.

Venus and Jupiter Conjunction
The day after the Super Blood Wolf Moon, on January 22 a beautiful conjunction of two planets will take place. Venus and Jupiter will be just 2.4 degrees apart in the eastern sky during pre-dawn. There is another chance this could happen later in the year on November 24, when the planets may be even closer - just 1.4 degrees apart after sunset.

Blue Moon
Ther is a Blue Moon on May 2019. The May 18, full moon is a Blue Moon according to an older definition of the term. It’s a seasonal Blue Moon: the third of four full moons to occur in a single season. A Blue Moon by this definition only comes 7 times in 19 calendar years.

Total Solar Eclipse
In July, a rare total eclipse will take place. This total solar eclipse will be visible from small parts of Chile and Argentina just before sunset. Some regions in the Pacific and in South America, including locations in Ecuador, Brazil, Uruguay, and Paraguay will see a partial solar eclipse, if the weather permits.

Those in the areas it is visible can witness it on July 2, 2019, but remember to wear eye protection as the sun's rays can damage your eyes.

Black Moon Rising
There are many intriguing Moons, the Full Moon, the Supermoon, the Blue Moon, the Blood Moon, the Pink Moon and so many more. None, however, are as intriguing, or mysterious as the Black Moon. This rare Moon occurs just once every 32 months, and is set to rise on July 2019.

The Black Moon refers to the second New Moon within a month. And while the Moon itself will be pretty much invisible, it will, nonetheless, provide an incredible opportunity for stargazing since there will be a whole lot of darkness in the night sky.

Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun
Towards the end of the year on November 11, the last Transit of Mercury until 2032 will occur. This is where the disk of Mercury appears to cross the disk of the Sun as seen from Earth. It will be best seen from the eastern US, Central America and South America. This is an event that only happens 13 times per century and will next take place on November 13, 2032.

A Spectacular ‘Ring of Fire’ Eclipse
On December 26, a rare Annular Solar Eclipse will take place, known as a Ring of Fire eclipse. This event is when the Moon is a micro Moon, the furthest away from Earth it could possibly be - opposite to a supermoon.

This means that during the eclipse a ring appears around the Moon, as the Sun’s rays peek around the smaller Moon. As this is a solar eclipse, to observe it you will have to wear safety glasses or else risk damaging your eyes.

https://earthsky.org/tonight/supermoon-lunar-eclipse-january-20-21
https://earthsky.org/tonight/venus-jupiter-conjunction-on-january-22
https://telescopicwatch.com/must-see-stargazing-events/
https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1054203/Super-blood-moon-2019-when-is-next-total-lunar-eclipse-blood-moon-supermoon

Clips images credit: ESA/HUBBLE, ESO, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Dennis L. Mammana (TWAN)

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Solar Storm Warning: A Stream of Solar Wind is Expected to Hit Earth's Magnetic Field

Solar Update, January 22, 2019. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24.

The wind is flowing from a coronal hole (CH) in the sun's atmosphere. G1 (Minor) storm levels are likely on Jan. 24 as the coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS) moves into a geoeffective position.

The action begins during the late hours of Jan. 23rd when a co-rotating interaction region (CIR) is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field.

CIRs are transition zones between slow- and fast-moving solar wind streams. Solar wind plasma piles up in these regions, producing density gradients and shock waves that do a good job of sparking auroras.

After the CIR arrives, a stream of fast-moving (600 km/s) solar wind will follow. The combined effect could produce G1-class geomagnetic storms and bright Arctic auroras on Jan. 24-25.

Arctic sky watchers should remain alert for auroras.
http://spaceweather.com/
http://www.solarham.net/
https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

A solar filament broke free from the Sun and erupted into space (Jan. 21, 2019). Filaments are cooler clouds of gases that are suspended above the Sun by notoriously unstable, magnetic forces. The action was captured in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light.

Clips, images credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA, ESA/SOHO & helioviewer.org

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Solar Storm Warning: A Stream of Solar Wind is Expected to Hit Earth's Magnetic Field

Solar Update, January 22, 2019. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24.

The wind is flowing from a coronal hole (CH) in the sun's atmosphere. G1 (Minor) storm levels are likely on Jan. 24 as the coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS) moves into a geoeffective position.

The action begins during the late hours of Jan. 23rd when a co-rotating interaction region (CIR) is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field.

CIRs are transition zones between slow- and fast-moving solar wind streams. Solar wind plasma piles up in these regions, producing density gradients and shock waves that do a good job of sparking auroras.

After the CIR arrives, a stream of fast-moving (600 km/s) solar wind will follow. The combined effect could produce G1-class geomagnetic storms and bright Arctic auroras on Jan. 24-25.

Arctic sky watchers should remain alert for auroras.
http://spaceweather.com/
http://www.solarham.net/
https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

A solar filament broke free from the Sun and erupted into space (Jan. 21, 2019). Filaments are cooler clouds of gases that are suspended above the Sun by notoriously unstable, magnetic forces. The action was captured in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light.

Clips, images credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA, ESA/SOHO & helioviewer.org

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Solar Storm Warning: A Stream of Solar Wind is Expected to Hit Earth's Magnetic Field

Solar Update, January 22, 2019. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24. A stream of solar wind is heading for Earth, and it should arrive on Jan. 24.

The wind is flowing from a coronal hole (CH) in the sun's atmosphere. G1 (Minor) storm levels are likely on Jan. 24 as the coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS) moves into a geoeffective position.

The action begins during the late hours of Jan. 23rd when a co-rotating interaction region (CIR) is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field.

CIRs are transition zones between slow- and fast-moving solar wind streams. Solar wind plasma piles up in these regions, producing density gradients and shock waves that do a good job of sparking auroras.

After the CIR arrives, a stream of fast-moving (600 km/s) solar wind will follow. The combined effect could produce G1-class geomagnetic storms and bright Arctic auroras on Jan. 24-25.

Arctic sky watchers should remain alert for auroras.
http://spaceweather.com/
http://www.solarham.net/
https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

A solar filament broke free from the Sun and erupted into space (Jan. 21, 2019). Filaments are cooler clouds of gases that are suspended above the Sun by notoriously unstable, magnetic forces. The action was captured in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light.

Clips, images credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA, ESA/SOHO & helioviewer.org

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Two 'Mini Suns' in the Morning Sky - Venus and Jupiter Put on a Celestial Show

If you happen to see two intensely bright "stars" in the morning sky, you are probably looking at a pair of dazzling planets. On January 22, 2019, look at southeast to see the conjunction of the planets Venus and Jupiter in the predawn/dawn sky.

The two planets shIne brightly together like beacons or like two 'mini suns' as a friend from Hawaii says.

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets in the night sky, making them relatively easy to find because they should appear much more luminous than any stars. If you have clear skies overhead, you should be able to spot these eye-catching worlds with your naked eye.

If you own a telescope, don't forget to also look out for Jupiter's four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. As the moons dance around Jupiter, their positions every night will differ, but these natural satellites have been known to put on a celestial show for lucky skywatchers.

You simply can’t miss these two brilliant beauties. Venus and Jupiter rank as the third-brightest and fourth-brightest celestial bodies, respectively, after the sun and moon.
https://earthsky.org/tonight?offset=1

Clips, images credit: NASA/JPL. ESA/HUBBLE & ESO

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Two 'Mini Suns' in the Morning Sky - Venus and Jupiter Put on a Celestial Show

If you happen to see two intensely bright "stars" in the morning sky, you are probably looking at a pair of dazzling planets. On January 22, 2019, look at southeast to see the conjunction of the planets Venus and Jupiter in the predawn/dawn sky.

The two planets shIne brightly together like beacons or like two 'mini suns' as a friend from Hawaii says.

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets in the night sky, making them relatively easy to find because they should appear much more luminous than any stars. If you have clear skies overhead, you should be able to spot these eye-catching worlds with your naked eye.

If you own a telescope, don't forget to also look out for Jupiter's four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. As the moons dance around Jupiter, their positions every night will differ, but these natural satellites have been known to put on a celestial show for lucky skywatchers.

You simply can’t miss these two brilliant beauties. Venus and Jupiter rank as the third-brightest and fourth-brightest celestial bodies, respectively, after the sun and moon.
https://earthsky.org/tonight?offset=1

Clips, images credit: NASA/JPL. ESA/HUBBLE & ESO

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Two 'Mini Suns' in the Morning Sky - Venus and Jupiter Put on a Celestial Show

If you happen to see two intensely bright "stars" in the morning sky, you are probably looking at a pair of dazzling planets. On January 22, 2019, look at southeast to see the conjunction of the planets Venus and Jupiter in the predawn/dawn sky.

The two planets shIne brightly together like beacons or like two 'mini suns' as a friend from Hawaii says.

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets in the night sky, making them relatively easy to find because they should appear much more luminous than any stars. If you have clear skies overhead, you should be able to spot these eye-catching worlds with your naked eye.

If you own a telescope, don't forget to also look out for Jupiter's four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. As the moons dance around Jupiter, their positions every night will differ, but these natural satellites have been known to put on a celestial show for lucky skywatchers.

You simply can’t miss these two brilliant beauties. Venus and Jupiter rank as the third-brightest and fourth-brightest celestial bodies, respectively, after the sun and moon.
https://earthsky.org/tonight?offset=1

Clips, images credit: NASA/JPL. ESA/HUBBLE & ESO

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Commenting is disabled for this post.

Post has attachment
Two 'Mini Suns' in the Morning Sky - Venus and Jupiter Put on a Celestial Show

If you happen to see two intensely bright "stars" in the morning sky, you are probably looking at a pair of dazzling planets. On January 22, 2019, look at southeast to see the conjunction of the planets Venus and Jupiter in the predawn/dawn sky.

The two planets shIne brightly together like beacons or like two 'mini suns' as a friend from Hawaii says.

Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets in the night sky, making them relatively easy to find because they should appear much more luminous than any stars. If you have clear skies overhead, you should be able to spot these eye-catching worlds with your naked eye.

If you own a telescope, don't forget to also look out for Jupiter's four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. As the moons dance around Jupiter, their positions every night will differ, but these natural satellites have been known to put on a celestial show for lucky skywatchers.

You simply can’t miss these two brilliant beauties. Venus and Jupiter rank as the third-brightest and fourth-brightest celestial bodies, respectively, after the sun and moon.
https://earthsky.org/tonight?offset=1

Clips, images credit: NASA/JPL. ESA/HUBBLE & ESO

Music credit: YouTube Audio Library
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded