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Wellesley Institute
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“Literacy is the foundation of a good education and educational achievement is a good predictor of income. That trinity–literacy, education, income–is a powerful determinant of health. In fact, life expectancy, and health more generally, correlates pretty closely with education/income.” 
Studies show encouraging reading at an early age leads to higher education and income, and better overall health
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Our website has a new look! Check out our new publications table to find all you need from the Wellesley Institute.
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"How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away" via the Atlantic
Saying "you're not welcome here"—with spikes.
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Check out Michael Shapcott's, the Director of Housing and Innovation, interview on CBC's The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti. 
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On June 16th The Institute of Public Administration of Canada and the Institute for Social Research are hosting are hosting an in-depth discussion on how public policy can narrow the income gap. Sheila Block, Director of Economic Analysis at Wellesley Institute will be among the presenters, along with Brian Murphy from Stats Can, and Dr. Lesley Jacobs from the Institute for Social Research.
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Toronto Community Housing Tenants Leery of Giving Police Easy Access To Security Camera Footage
The Toronto Community Housing board is considering a proposal to give police routine access to security camera images.
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"The housing crisis is affecting health care use, too. Researchers looked at health care records for 1,165 adults using homeless shelters and meal programs in Toronto and found much higher than average rates of emergency department use and hospitalization. For people experiencing homelessness or housing vulnerability in Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver, researchers found that 55 per cent had visited the emergency department and 25 per cent had been hospitalized at least once in the past year."
Ontario has a housing crisis. And a housing crisis is a health crisis.
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"LGBTQ youth homeless shelter on the horizon" -- An important issue in Toronto. Congrats and thank you to Alex Abramovich for your hard work in this area. 
New research, success in other cities and a key city report raise the confidence of advocates for queer street youth
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There are many good ideas to reduce inequality, and the conditions are right for change.
Governments have the tools to reduce income inequality and the Canadian public expects them to act, Toronto forum told.
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There's no doubt that poverty makes you sick. This interesting article from The Atlantic paints a different picture of what health care providers can do to tackle the social determinants of health. Every heard of being prescribed a bike?! And can this idea work? Read on.
Some patients are being "prescribed" bicycles and groceries as doctors attempt to treat the lifestyle consequences of poverty, in addition to its medical symptoms. Can it work?
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It's mental health week in Canada this week. Look for local events in your area:
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Have them in circles
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Twitter: @wellesleyWI
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We engage in research, policy & community mobilization to advance population health
Introduction
In 2006 the Wellesley Central Health Corporation changed its name to the Wellesley Institute, reflecting its evolution from developer to think tank. Today, the Wellesley Institute is a non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute that focuses on finding solutions to problems of urban health disparities.