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Bob De Jonge
Attended Kettering University
Lived in Zeeland, MI
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Bob De Jonge

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I learned something new on my ride yesterday: http://connect.garmin.com/activity/113307208
Well, maybe re-learned something…
I headed out for a nice Saturday morning ride, thinking I would do a few hours. I ended up coming across an unexpected water refill (via a SAG wagon attached to a local ride going on), so I was able to go farther than my original water supply would have supported. There are no watering holes out in the backwoods area I was riding.
At around 60 miles or so, I had my first of what was going to be around 20 or so auto-shifts. For some reason, my bike was auto-shifting onto the small chainring periodically. Now, I have Di2 on this bike, so my first thought was that I had inadvertently tapped the left shifter. Well, after a few auto-shifts took place with my hands on the drops, and nowhere near the hoods or shifters, I started thinking I had an electrical gremlin of some nature. I started to think and diagnose as I rode — looking for shorted wires, or broken leads/connectors…
I was going up the last climb of the ride at around 90 miles (a shallow, maybe 3% grade), standing at the time (as I was heading for <5 hours for the hundered), when I had another auto-shift down to the small chainring.
I looked down, and my chain came off.
The master link pin had backed out, and the chain had come apart.
Suddenly, it all made sense —
My auto-shifting was taking place because the link had started to back out, and the exposed end of the pin had been contacting the front derailleur tripping the chain down onto the small chainring!
Some of you may be familiar with the Shimano 7900 chain. It has all hollow links, except for the master link pin. That pin is unique, in that it is not a constant diameter. Each end is the normal press-fit diameter, which is pressed into the chain link side plate. This diameter is only held at each end of the pin for maybe a millimeter. A very short shoulder. The middle of the link is a smaller diameter, a slip fit relative to the side plate hole diameters.
So, this is why Shimano recommends using a new link pin (not free BTW) every time you take your chain apart. Not surprising, as it is very touchy, given the narrowness of the 10-speed chain and the tiny press-fit shoulders on the link pin, to not have that pin pressed back in exactly right. Plus, one can imagine those tiny shoulders becoming worn after repeated assemblies. This issue would not exist in a conventional chain, with a constant diameter pin that is pressed in. With the Shimano chain, once the press-fit shoulder was loose in one chain link side plate, it was free to move all the way over to the opposite end. This was what was happening during my ride. The link pin would get pushed sideways, it would contact the derailleur, and my chain would dump onto the small chainring.
So, lesson here is: if you encounter this phenomenon, and have a Shimano 10-speed chain, stop immediately and press that pin back in!!!
Had I recognized this, I could've stopped at the first auto-shift, checked my chain and found the loose link, and pressed it back in without issue.
As it was, I had to remove that link, as one side plate was missing. I had to press out one of the hollow links (these ARE NOT designed nor intended for removal) and reassemble the chain. I had a chain tool along (another recommended bit of mass to tote around with you) so the pressing out/in wasn't the issue. I was wondering how the hollow link would react to it.
Well, I made it home, being only 10 or so miles away. I soft-pedaled the whole way, not wanting to stress that link any more than I needed to. But, I made it. —ruined my ride time and came in at 5:05 :(
Now, actually looking closely at my chain, I cannot find that link I pressed out! I figured it would be mushed out, deformed, etc. from that pressing, but no. So, what do I do? I may just go out today on the same chain to try it out. We'll see…
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Сервис по продаже АТМ карт с пин кодами(дамп+пин).
Дубликаты пластиковых карт Англии, Германии и США.
Обналичивание кредитных поддельных карт залитых на
белый пластик и цветной с пин-кодом для вывода баланса через атм-банкоматы.

Visa Gold баланс от 1500$ цена 450$
Visa Platinum баланс от 2500$ цена 500$
MasterCard Gold баланс от 1500€ цена 450€
MasterCard Platinum баланс от 2500€ цена 550€

Так же в наличии имеются карты Русских банков

Visa Classi баланс от 1000$ цена 350$
MasterCard баланс от 1000$ цена 350$

Доставка в течении 2-5 рабочих дней в любую страну мира.
Продажа как по предоплате так и без предоплаты.

Наше видео доступно по следующему адресу: http://www.youtube.com/embed/JCXBQKtfbUs?rel=0

Если вы готовы к сотрудничеству, писать на : Karding_Obnal@yahoo.de
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Bob De Jonge

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Had to have some custard pie for breakfast— NOM.
goes well with SBUX Italian Roast coffee
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And, I had some cream in the fridge starting to go south. So, what then?
Of course!—
Custard Pie :)
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Bob De Jonge

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I'm calling weekend.
Finally digging into some KBC Sesquicentennial special IPA…
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Bob De Jonge

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Bleeding the brakes - trying out some ceramic pads…
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Bob De Jonge

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Do you rotate tires on your bike?
—years ago I logged everything: chain wax intervals, chain life, tire life, when I rotated back-to-front, etc. I just replaced a Vittoria Rubino Pro, used totally on the rear - a 25 width tire - got 3200 miles which I think is quite good, when considering rear use only.
So, I went back into my old logs looking at tire life. I used to rotate a new tire from back to front after about 2500 miles.
Then, it would easily go to 6000+ miles until the case showed in a spot.
I've tried using tires on the front only as well, and they've always been replaced from material breakdown (sun/ozone damage & weathering), never due to tread wear.
using this routine, I tended to accumulate tires, as a new tire on the rear would reach 2500 miles before a 2500-mile old tire put on the front would wear out. I would use these tires on my bikes in the winter on rollers. (I still have a big supply of 'roller tires'!)

Anyway, just curious what your experience has been.
What mileage (documented - real data) do you get from tires?
Preferred brands?
Do you rotate? When?
Front-to-rear? Or, the other way round?
BTW— that Rubino Pro is added to my roller tires box, as it just has 1 small spot of case showing ;)
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Wow that's some great mileage. My problem has been that I was using the Open Corsa CX and they don't last very long. Maybe 1000 miles. I have switched back to Conti Ultra GatorSkins and already have 1500miles on them.. I rotate every time I do a full cleaning on my bike... which I do every couple weeks.
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Bob De Jonge

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alright.
mini training camp is over, bike packed.
satisfied with work productivity + cycling balance this week—great week in both respects!—over 10,000 feet of vertical in this week - I'm good with that. not bad for a Michigander flatlander :)
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naaahhh — in one day would be something! Just a good week, though. Solid 1000-2000 feet vertical every day. worked the ol' bod really well!
Back to flatlands now - normal evening loop here is about 300-400 feet over a 40-mile loop.
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Bob De Jonge

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Is anybody out there…?
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ehh, don't have many contacts on here yet sooo still using facebook for the most part
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Bob De Jonge

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juggling chain waxing and custard pie making… :)
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Don't get any chain wax on your custard
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Blackberry pie construction on a rainy Sunday…
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Ha!
Sailing. I know I would love it, but intentionally stayed away to save $$.
Food-wise, though, I'll likely always do alright. Years of self-sufficiency & no $$ makes for a creative cook (a local patch of blackberries certainly helps)
Don't run too well, unless a bear is chasing me.
Don't swim too well, but I've a heck of a dog paddle.
You know what's interesting, though? I tend to be quite good at things that don't earn $$.
Wrong focus? Well, certainly the well-off in this world would say so, and many times I second-guess some choices I've made. But, in the long run, I'm pretty content I'm headed in the right direction.
Much work to do yet, though…
Happy Sunday!
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Bob De Jonge

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Cuckoo clocks are neat!
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This year's blueberry jam vintage is perfect
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These were tame berries. We just started a few bushes at the southern cabin. Not enough for a batch of jam yet.
Pretty good year for wild berries in the Keweenaw this year, though.
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In his circles
46 people
Have him in circles
146 people
Brant Collins's profile photo
Richard La China's profile photo
Fedric Aston's profile photo
Mike Mason's profile photo
Reg Barber's profile photo
Mark Anthony's profile photo
Paul Kortman's profile photo
Dave Savage's profile photo
colleen carroll's profile photo
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Zeeland, MI - Hericy, France - Placentia, CA - Brea, CA - Bay City, MI - Flint, MI - Chassell, MI - Bewdley, UK
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