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Olivia Baker
An old fashioned Lady in modern Elizabeth's England.
An old fashioned Lady in modern Elizabeth's England.
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The Art Before the Artist
We did this thing at The Feast of St Nicholas in Queen Elizabeth's Court back in December that I think some in the bardic community may like and some may not. Regardless, I would like to share, as it was so incredibly well received by the attendees. The eve...

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The deadline or entering the A&S or Bardic competitions is THIS COMING MONDAY, February 6th. If you have not already registered, (tisk, tisk), there's not much time left!

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I feel this information is very useful. So, I'm sharing it again at a more reasonable time of the day. 

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Want to learn a bit about event promotion? Have at it!

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The Cookbook from The Feast of St. Nicholas in Queen Elizabeth's Court, held in December. Thank you +Joel Lord for all of your time and effort in making this amazing feast happen!

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The website for King & Queen's A&S and Bardic Champions is up! Take a peek:


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The Feast of a Kingdom
Four years ago, I had this idea about an Elizabethan immersion event, comprised of an all day feast with loads of entertainment! Three years ago, I started planning it. Bit-by-bit, pieces came together. Master Valentine agreed to be my Deputy. Lord Joel agr...

Today in "Things I Learned While Doing Historical Research":

Turducken is NOT some new thing -

"A Tudor Christmas Pie was indeed a sight to behold but not one to be enjoyed by a vegetarian. The contents of this dish consisted of a Turkey stuffed with a goose stuffed with a chicken stuffed with a partridge stuffed with a pigeon. All of this was put in a pastry case, called a coffin and was served surrounded by jointed hare, small game birds and wild fowl."

Now THERE'S a pigeon, whole! ;)


Random factoid for the day: Did you know Leonardo da Vinci created a machine for producing paillettes, also called spangles (basically, flat, metal sequins).

Filing this under The Cool Things I Learn While Researching Historical Costuming.

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Every Journey Begins Somewhere
People often complement my garb and level of authenticity in it. I've heard people say they wish they could make garb like mine. I've heard people say they don't have the talent to make clothes like mine. However, I didn't start with this garb. It's taken y...
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