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Joshua Ricard
Attended Miskatonic University
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Joshua Ricard

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Fully emerged!
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And loving it!!! There is a lot of potential in this system...I highly recommend it so far!!!
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http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/357610/Darth-Vader-to-be-resurrected

This is possibly the most disappointing news I have ever read as a Star Wars and movie fan. Please...someone prevent this from happening.

#StarWars  
Darth Vader to be resurrected | Day & Night | - Hot gossip and showbiz news
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Not sure who is going to win this election...but I am ordering another magazine for my gun and buying more ammunition tomorrow just in case. And if by chance Obama wins, I order the Phoenix Arms .22LR and the Hi-Point .40 ASAP. #2ndAmendmentRights   #DefendingMyHome    #GodBlessMurica  
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Get on board, folks!!!
Overview · Web browsing · Office applications · Social and email · Music and mobile · Photos and videos · Ubuntu Software Centre · Ubuntu One · What's new? Why use Ubuntu? Why is it free? Business · D...
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Joshua Ricard

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To my technically inclined friends (or anyone listening)...can anyone point me to a good site or mirror for PCBSD? I think the FTP server for pcbsd.com is not working, and hasn't been for the last week. Trying to get the download going and it keeps dropping out after about 10 minutes or so. I can't even find a decent torrent on Torlock or Pirate Bay (no one seeding). IF anyone can help me locate a PCBSD .iso or VirtualBox image you would make me a happy nerd :D #PCBSD   #FreeBSD   #VirtualBox   #Virtualization  
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I love that Michigan teachers are all calling sick as a protest to the right-to-work bill even though only 7% of 8th graders in Detroit can read at their grade appropriate level (according to the US Dept. Of Education).

Color me in favor of anything that has a chance to increase competition among teachers that can lead to better standards and knocking down unions that have long lost their usefulness in modern day America. #Priorities #Michigan
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http://storybundle.com/

Anyone with an E-Reader needs to visit this site! BEst deal in ebooks I have seen yet!

#Kindle  
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Joshua Ricard's profile photoChristopher Grant's profile photo
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I don't mean to share willy-nilly with anyone. Two going in for a 5'er each, which equals 10, which is more than the 7 needed for the bonus...so in the end more $ goes to the writers. It's a collective of purchasers to interface with the collective of sellers. You have to put skin in the game...to share.

What's the dif if you buy the bundle then, one day, loan one or two of the books to someone?
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Please do not throw sausage pizza away.

#NerdStudies  
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All people seem to need data processing.

^This one seems to work better when I think about it.
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A Simple Fix for Farming by Mark Bittman

IT’S becoming clear that we can grow all the food we need, and profitably, with far fewer chemicals. And I’m not talking about imposing some utopian vision of small organic farms on the world. Conventional agriculture can shed much of its chemical use — if it wants to.
This was hammered home once again in what may be the most important agricultural study this year, although it has been largely ignored by the media, two of the leading science journals and even one of the study’s sponsors, the often hapless Department of Agriculture.
The study was done on land owned by Iowa State University called the Marsden Farm. On 22 acres of it, beginning in 2003, researchers set up three plots: one replicated the typical Midwestern cycle of planting corn one year and then soybeans the next, along with its routine mix of chemicals. On another, they planted a three-year cycle that included oats; the third plot added a four-year cycle and alfalfa. The longer rotations also integrated the raising of livestock, whose manure was used as fertilizer.
The results were stunning: The longer rotations produced better yields of both corn and soy, reduced the need for nitrogen fertilizer and herbicides by up to 88 percent, reduced the amounts of toxins in groundwater 200-fold and didn’t reduce profits by a single cent.
In short, there was only upside — and no downside at all — associated with the longer rotations. There was an increase in labor costs, but remember that profits were stable. So this is a matter of paying people for their knowledge and smart work instead of paying chemical companies for poisons. And it’s a high-stakes game; according to the Environmental Protection Agency, about five billion pounds of pesticidesare used each year in the United States.
No one expects Iowacorn and soybean farmers to turn this thing around tomorrow, but one might at least hope that the U.S.D.A.would trumpet the outcome. The agency declined to comment when I asked about it. One can guess that perhaps no one at the higher levels even knows about it, or that they’re afraid to tell Monsantoabout agency-supported research that demonstrates a decreased need for chemicals. (A conspiracy theorist might note that the journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences both turned down the study. It was finally published in PLOS One; I first read about it on the Union of Concerned Scientists Web site.)
Rosie Gainsborough Debates about how we grow food are usually presented in a simplistic, black-and-white way, conventional versus organic. (The spectrum that includes conventional on one end and organic on the other is not unlike the one that opposes the standard American diet with veganism.) In farming, you have loads of chemicals and disastrous environmental impact against an orthodox, even dogmatic method that is difficult to carry out on a large scale.
But seeing organic as the only alternative to industrial agriculture, or veganism as the only alternative to supersize me, is a bit like saying that the only alternative to the ravages of capitalism is Stalinism; there are other ways. And positioning organic as the only alternative allows its opponents to point to its flaws and say, “See? We have to remain with conventional.”
The Marsden Farm study points to a third path. And though critics of this path can be predictably counted on to say it’s moving backward, the increased yields, markedly decreased input of chemicals, reduced energy costs and stable profits tell another story, one of serious progress.
Nor was this a rinky-dink study: the background and scientific rigor of the authors — who represent the U.S.D.A.’s Agricultural Research Service as well as two of the country’s leading agricultural universities — are unimpeachable. When I asked Adam Davis, an author of the study who works for the U.S.D.A., to summarize the findings, he said, “These were simple changes patterned after those used by North American farmers for generations. What we found was that if you don’t hold the natural forces back they are going to work for you.”
THIS means that not only is weed suppression a direct result of systematic and increased crop rotation along with mulching, cultivation and other nonchemical techniques, but that by not poisoning the fields, we make it possible for insects, rodents and other critters to do their part and eat weeds and their seeds. In addition, by growing forage crops for cattle or other ruminants you can raise healthy animals that not only contribute to the health of the fields but provide fertilizer. (The same manure that’s a benefit in a system like this is a pollutant in large-scale, confined animal-rearing operations, where thousands of animals make manure disposal an extreme challenge.)
Perhaps most difficult to quantify is that this kind of farming — more thoughtful and less reflexive —requires more walking of the fields, more observations, more applications of fertilizer and chemicals if, when and where they’re needed, rather than on an all-inclusive schedule. “You substitute producer knowledge for blindly using inputs,” Davis says.
So: combine crop rotation, the re-integration of animals into crop production and intelligent farming, and you can use chemicals (to paraphrase the report’s abstract) to fine-tune rather than drive the system, with no loss in performance and in fact the gain of animal products.
Why wouldn’t a farmer go this route? One answer is that first he or she has to hear about it. Another, says Matt Liebman, one of the authors of the study and an agronomy professor at Iowa State, is that, “There’s no cost assigned to environmental externalities” — the environmental damage done by industrial farming, analogous to the health damage done by the “cheap” standard American diet — “and the profitability of doing things with lots of chemical input isn’t questioned.”
This study not only questions those assumptions, it demonstrates that the chemicals contributing to “environmental externalities” can be drastically reduced at no sacrifice, except to that of the bottom line of chemical companies. That direction is in the interest of most of us — or at least those whose well-being doesn’t rely on that bottom line.
Sadly, it seems there isn’t a government agency up to the task of encouraging things to move that way, even in the face of convincing evidence.

#EatSmart   #prop37   #GoNatural   #GoOrganic   #TheTruth  
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Have him in circles
71 people
Sofi Lorraine Lubanski's profile photo
Rissa Robert's profile photo
Lydia Taylor's profile photo
Jason Gourrier's profile photo
Barbette Boutte's profile photo
Elizabeth Franca's profile photo
Joshua Zabel's profile photo
Andre Santos's profile photo
Samantha Alexander's profile photo
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The Man, The Myth, The Legend, The...Alpha Geek!
Introduction
Born in New Orleans, LA and currently living in Fredericksburg, VA. Happily married, have a great mutt, and I love all the benefits of being a huge nerd.
Education
  • Miskatonic University
    Paranormal Studies, 2003 - 2006
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