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Bluelog

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For a limited time you can sign up and get a free TrackR BLE device. I've used these in the past, and they are a very well put together little device.

Excellent way to get started experimenting with BLE.
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Bluelog

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So, apparently Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) scanning under Linux requires root...
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The Powerbase's profile photoTom Nardi's profile photo
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Very interesting project to build a crowd-sourced database of discovered Bluetooth devices.

Looking forward to seeing what can be done with this data.
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The Powerbase's profile photoTom Nardi's profile photo
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Bluelog

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The latest commits to the development build of Bluelog enable something it has taken far too long to get around to doing: config file support. Now you can configure Bluelog's voluminous options in /etc/bluelog.conf rather than having to always use the command line.

To enable config file mode, simply run Bluelog with no options; it will check for the config file and run whatever setup it contains.

Any feedback and testing would be appreciated on this.
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Tom Nardi's profile photo
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Bluelog

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Obfuscation Bug in 1.1.1

Just to let everyone know, there is a buffer overflow bug in Bluelog 1.1.1 which will cause a crash when using the obfuscate (-x) option after the first device has been scanned.

I've fixed this in the development version, and will likely be releasing 1.1.2 soon to address this problem, but in the meantime you use 1.1.0 if you need MAC obfuscation. Otherwise switch over to encode (-e) option if you want to keep MACs anonymous with 1.1.1.
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Tom Nardi's profile photo
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Bluelog

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Just thinking out loud here, but I've been considering creating a fork of Bluelog for WiFi. Basically, it would do everything Bluelog does, in the same way, but instead of searching for discoverable BT devices, it would find WiFi networks.

There are, of course, many excellent WiFi scanners already available. I'll never hope to do all the things that some of the more advanced ones can do, which I have no problem with.

The core concept of Bluelog is to be highly configurable, fast, small, and have as few dependencies as possible; and that wouldn't change with a WiFi version.

I suppose the biggest question is, are the functions that have made Bluelog popular also desirable in the WiFi space?
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Kyhwana Pardus's profile photoTom Nardi's profile photo
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+Kyhwana Pardus  I've experimented with running Bluelog on Android via a minimal Linux chroot which worked very well, but beyond that, my investigations into the subject seem so show it would take a lot of work to get a mre native Bluelog build running. It's something I would like to do, but it would definitely be a challenge.

As for GPSd support, this isn't really that hard to implement and it's something I had always planned to do. But as Bluelog matured and people started telling me about how it was being used, it seemed like everyone was running it from a static location, so the idea of recording GPS coordinates seemed kind of silly.

But if there is really desire for it, I will look into adding it again.
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Have them in circles
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Bluelog

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Native network support in Bluelog

Thanks to the assistance of Ian Macdonald, I'm happy to announce that Bluelog now has native networking support.

Networking is the first feature of Bluelog that is not configurable via the command line; there are just too many variables at this point. So you'll need to check out the networking section of bluelog.conf (under /etc/bluelog) to get things like server IP setup.

But what about the server side? All you need is something that will listen on a port for UDP traffic, which you can easily do with netcat. I'll be including a simple Perl script with Bluelog soon if you're looking for something a bit more turn-key.

If you're interested in checking out the new UDP networking mode, just pull down the latest version of Bluelog from GitHub and have fun.
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Bluelog

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Phase 1 of creating a Bluetooth scanner: Get a lot of Bluetooth compatible devices.
 
2014 Family Portrait

Its been awhile since I got them all out, so I thought I would post a picture of the current fleet.

Now I haven't use each one of these as a daily driver (especially the pink one...), but they have all been used in some capacity or another for research purposes.

Bonus points for anyone who wants to try to ID them all. Who can figure out the most?
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Bluelog

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In the latest issue of 2600 somebody wrote in with a idea of using Bluetooth to find survivors in a natural disaster, building collapse, etc.

The person suggests that people be told to set their devices to something like "SOS" and make sure they are put on discoverable mode. This seems like a pretty tall order for somebody who is stuck under a pile of ruble to remember, but the idea isn't without merit. Being able to search for devices with a known name (or even MAC) may be useful.

Anyone think adding this feature would be worthwhile? I was thinking having a file under /etc/bluelog that would contain Bluetooth device names to keep an eye out for, and when Bluelog found one it would...well, I'm not sure about that part yet. Something like a special syslog message perhaps. Or maybe run a command specified in the configuration file.

P.S.
The person who wrote the letter decided to do so anonymously for some reason; so I can't contact him/her directly to get any more info on what they had in mind. Don't suppose the person who wrote the letter will find this post?
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Bluelog

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Bluelog 1.1.2 Released

Bluelog 1.1.2 is a minor release, primarily dealing with visual and functional improvements to Bluelog Live mode. Bluelog Live now has a new default theme, as well as a novelty theme for fun, and there is improved support for more complex themes (take a look at README.LIVE for more info).

Other features of 1.1.2 include documentation improvement/pruning across the board, a new target for the Pwnie Express Pwn Pad, and a fix for a critical bug with the obfuscate (-x) function from 1.1.1.

Starting with this release, you can get the latest tarball directly from GitHub:

https://github.com/MS3FGX/Bluelog/releases/tag/1.1.2
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Jose L. Quinones Borrero's profile photoTom Nardi's profile photo
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Bluelog

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Run command on device discovery?

So one of the things that's always been on my mental "todo" list for Bluelog was make it so the user could configure a command to be run every time a device was discovered. This would let you do all sorts of interesting things on device discovery, like playing audio files or blinking LEDs.

But I've been worried about the logistics of this from a security and stability standpoint, so I've never actually started to implement it.

Earlier today, somebody contacted me about enabling just this feature. I'll be using this setup as a test case to see how this concept works in the real world, and perhaps finally make it a reality.

How does everyone feel about this? Is this a feature that others would find useful? How should it be handled from a configuration standpoint (perhaps it's time to get a config file)?
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Bluelog

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Here is a cool Arch Linux metapackage for pen testing on AUR which Bluelog is included in.
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Have them in circles
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Tagline
A highly configurable Linux Bluetooth scanner with optional web interface.
Introduction
Bluelog is a fast and highly configurable Bluetooth scanner for Linux written in C and licensed under the GPLv2.

It is primarily designed for unattended long duration scans. As such, it is unique in that it has no real UI to speak of, and in fact is the only Bluetooth scanner that features a daemon mode.

Bluelog also features an optional web interface, where scan results are presented in plain English on a constantly updating web page. This mode is greatly influenced by the "Wall of Sheep" display, and is intended to raise public awareness about potential Bluetooth security risks.