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Carlos Aguado
Works at Blue Brain Project - EPFL
Attended Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Lives in Geneva, Switzerland
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Carlos Aguado

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git pull sun perihelion:lightness
git rebase work
git add presents*
git commit -m "Three Kings 2015"
git review -t friends
git push remember feeling_good
 
Near and Far

Today marks the point in Earth’s orbit where it is closest to the Sun, known as perihelion. It might seem odd for those in the northern hemisphere for this to occur in the middle of winter, but that’s because the seasons are due largely to the tilt of Earth’s axis relative to its orbital plane. The variation in Earth’s distance from the Sun is minor in comparison, because Earth’s orbit is almost (but not quite) a perfect circle.

The difference between perihelion (closest to the Sun) and aphelion (most distant) for Earth is just under 5 million kilometers. That’s quite a distance, but it is only about 3% of Earth’s average distance. Treating Earth orbit as a perfect circle is actually a good approximation. The same is true for the other planets, which is part of the reason why the whole “orbits are circles” idea of early astronomy lasted as long as it did. Of course that raises the question as to just why planetary orbits are so nearly circular.

There are likely several factors that played a role in forming circular orbits. One is that as early protoplanets form, more elliptical orbits would tend to cross the paths of other bodies, and collision with them would tend to produce more circular orbits. Then their is the fact that large planets such as Jupiter tend to form early on, and their gravitational influence will tend to clump smaller bodies into groups. It could also be due to orbital resonances between smaller bodies, which would tend to stabilize orbits. Then there are affects such as the Kozai mechanism, when tend to align orbits into a common plane. Then there is the fact that circular orbits are more stable against gravitational perturbations than elliptical orbits.

As we’re learning from computer simulations, the dynamics of solar systems are quite complex. But simulations do show that nearly circular orbits are quite common, and studies of exoplanets also show nearly circular orbits in many cases. So it seems that throughout the universe circular orbits are a good approximation for planets.

But it isn’t exact, which is why we can celebrate today as our closest day to the Sun. It also happens to be Isaac Newton’s birthday, which is perhaps fitting given his work on planetary orbits.
Today marks the point in Earth's orbit where it is closest to the Sun, known as perihelion. It might seem odd for those in the northern hemisphere for this to occur in the middle of winter, but that's because the seasons are due largely to the tilt of Earth's axis relative to its orbital plane. The variation in Earth's distance from the Sun is minor in comparison, because Earth's orbit is almost (but not quite) a perfect circle.
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Carlos Aguado

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A very original footage, such a nice way to illustrate population inversion!
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Sanely fun!!
 
The finest example of sportsmanship I've ever seen lol haha.. Two men at the top of their game having fun... how life is meant to be lived!
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Congratulations from CERN, the +ATLAS Experiment & +CMS Experiment to François Englert & Peter Higgs for 2013 Physics #NobelPrize #BosonNobel :'-D

Image shows event displays of particle tracks in the CMS experiment detector (top) and the ATLAS experiment detector (bottom) indicating the presence of a Higgs boson. This image is released under CC-BY-SA.

For more Creative Commons CERN images see: http://cds.cern.ch/collection/Creative%20Commons%20Images%20from%20CERN
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On the magnificence of laws of physics:  ripple effects in standing waves
 
This video is definitely worth five minutes of your time. Steve Mould does something really simple -- takes a really long beaded chain in a beaker, and drops the chain over the side. And what happens is pretty magical, so he films it in slow motion and explains, very clearly, why it happens.

What are you seeing here? Part of it is simply gravity: the weight of the chain that's hanging over the side is pulling the rest of the chain over. Part of it is waves in the motion of the chain. Part of it is the fact that the chain can't change direction infinitely quickly. And all of it will, as io9 puts it (http://io9.com/this-is-the-bead-chain-experiment-its-about-to-melt-y-602029455), melt your brain.

via +Jennifer Ouellette, who finds the coolest damned stuff on the Internet. If you're not following her, you should be.
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The best outreach from the lab!!
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Piaget condensed in Kegan's work: 'The Evolving Self', the Frankfurt school of psychology... more relevant than ever topics. The turn things are taking in this big lab google has become is quite astounding.
Google is trying to disrupt the oldest system of all -- the methodology we use to decide who we hire and reward professionally. Today, Google announced a new workshop that takes on the unconscious ...
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Good time to share this summary thread. On closure, imperialism, self-transforming, roadtrip agendas, planes et al.
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...the garage where CernVM was born!
 
Guess what it is?

Image © CERN - for terms of use see http://cern.ch/copyright

(Answer will be posted on Monday...)
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That brings back memories :-)
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A truly delightful weekend, enjoying the sharing and fun of science.
 
Thank you to the thousands of visitors to CERN for #OpenCERN13, we loved sharing our universe with you!

See a selection of the Open Day weekend's photos here: http://plus.google.com/photos/106123073424280939934/albums/5928599573730820657 and http://plus.google.com/photos/106123073424280939934/albums/5928953996296911233

Image credit Maximilien Brice/CERN © CERN - for terms of use see http://cern.ch/copyright
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Almost every day, big brain research is in the news. The US government is apparently planning to put three billion dollars into a project that aims to map the active human brain. In the recently published paper by Alivisatos et al (2012) I found the following explanation: "To elucidate emergent levels of neural circuit function, we propose to record every action potential from every neuron within a circuit—a task we believe is feasible." I guess this is a safe statement, since the goal is reached, if we put a retina (the circuit) on a sufficiently large multi-electrode array (MEA). But how to record all action potentials in cortex, for example, remains to be seen. In any case, if the US project becomes reality, it would be a tremendous chance for the European Human Brain Project to obtain the data it desperately needs to calibrate and validate its models.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/26/science/proposed-brain-mapping-project-faces-significant-hurdles.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/opinion/sunday/the-next-frontier-is-in-your-brain.html
http://www.cell.com/neuron/fulltext/S0896-6273%2812%2900518-1
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if the Universe is the answer, what is the question?
Introduction
Finding nemesis
Education
  • Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
    Telecommunications engineer, 2001 - 2007
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Infrastructure engineer
Employment
  • Blue Brain Project - EPFL
    Infrastructure architect, 2011 - present
  • Swisscloud
    Infrastructure Lead Engineer, 2010 - 2011
  • CernVM - CERN
    Fellow, 2008 - 2010
  • ETICS - CERN
    Internship, 2006 - 2007
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Geneva, Switzerland
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Working out the gears to reverse engineer the mammalian brain