Profile

Cover photo
Georgie Cousens
Works at Ideaseed
Attended Ogilvy & Mather's Red and Yellow School of Advertising, Copywriting and Design
Lives in New South Wales, 2576, Australia
9 followers|4,520 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
 
IDEASEED'S MS OFFICE SHORTCUTS: POWERPOINT

We know what it’s like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can’t remember what it is.

We’re here to help you so we’ve created a handy list of the most useful shortcuts.

Today, we’re covering MS Office Powerpoint, but we also have a great list for MS Office Word here and even for MS Office Excel.
 
Download the pdf for it here: http://ideaseed.com.au/recent-news/ideaseeds-ms-office-shortcuts-powerpoint/
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
IDEASEED'S MS OFFICE SHORTCUTS: EXCEL

We know what it’s like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can’t remember what it is.

We’re here to help you so we’ve created a handy list of the most useful shortcuts.

Today, we’re covering MS Office Excel, but we also have a great list for MS Office Word here and one for Powerpoint coming up soon.
 
Download the pdf for it here: http://ideaseed.com.au/recent-news/ideaseeds-ms-office-shortcuts-excel/
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
BIG DATA 

Last week we talked about Infographics as a great alternative to presenting data. These are becoming more popular as we move away from the standard table and chart format – and praise the lord for that!

Another new buzzword in business reporting is big data.

What is big data?

Big data is the huge traffic of information available in our digital age. This comes from online sources such as social media, market data, traffic data, transaction records, music and video downloads.
Big data if used correctly will be very powerful for businesses big and small. It will enable businesses to be more agile, more efficient and more competitive.

Agile – stay connected to your clients and customers easier through social media.

Efficient – store and share your company knowledge on cloud servers to enable easy access any time, any place for a truly mobile, collaborative workforce.

Competitive – achieve greater visibility of your competitive landscape and where you can find a niche.

One of the problems we find with big data is information overload and how to make sense of it when presenting it. Data visualisation is key.

As with Infographics, data visualisation involves a graphic presentation of data. How it differs is the scale of data being used and having graphics update automatically with new data as it is available.

Ideaseed have done some great work for clients to incorporate big data and data visualisations into their presentations. This can be feeding live data to refresh charts automatically rather than a manual input. Saves time and headaches!

You can find some some examples of our work on our website http://ideaseed.com.au/portfolio/ 

Get in touch with us to learn more. http://ideaseed.com.au/contact-us/
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
I can help - no problem, here's some basics to include in your presentation.
 
The clock is ticking!  You've only been given a short time to get a presentation together - but what do you put in it? 
*BACK TO BASICS: WHAT DO YOU INCLUDE IN YOUR PRESENTATION? *So how much notice have you been given to make a stand out presentation? Did you get 5-mins notice? 5-days? or 5 weeks notice? Well it really doesn’t matter how much time you were given, the basics stand for each and every presentation. To make your presentation powerful you need 3-key elements
A simple design
Powerful images
A good story
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
Easy steps on creating more successful corporate presentations.
As compared to traditional forms of advertising, more and more companies are using corporate presentations to convey their message to their target audience. Corporate Presentation is a unique way of communicating and building the brand...
1
Add a comment...
Have her in circles
9 people
NSW Architects Registration Board's profile photo
AcademyPhotography's profile photo
Canon Australia's profile photo
Out & About in Australia (mostly)'s profile photo
Australia Post's profile photo
Ideaseed Australia's profile photo
MyBusiness's profile photo

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
HOW TO PRESENT LIKE STEVE JOBS

It’s been 3 years since Steve Jobs lost his battle against cancer, but the charismatic Apple co-founder is still lauded as the world’s greatest corporate storyteller. His keynote presentations have become the stuff of legends, and continue to attract thousands of views on YouTube.

Want to transform your presentation from boring to brilliant?
 
Here are 8 tips you can learn from Steve Jobs’ presentation style:
 
1. What’s your message?
Audiences left a Steve Jobs presentation knowing exactly why a product was built and how it solved their problems. Jobs did this by creating a message with a higher purpose. Instead of saying, “We have built an easier-to-use MP3 player, he captured the audience’s imagination with a powerful theme: with the iPod, Apple put “1000 songs in your pocket”.
 
2. Every story needs a tagline.
When Jobs presented the iPhone in 2007, he gave the audience a Twitter-friendly headline. “Apple reinvents the phone” became fodder for editors and bloggers across the world.
 
3. Draw a road map.
Introduce what you’ll be addressing in your presentation in such a way as to build anticipation. The iPhone launch began with Jobs announcing that he would be introducing 3 revolutionary new products, and then revealed that these 3 products were all rolled into one – the iPhone. Boom. Instant anticipation.
 
4. Stick to the Rule of Three.
Jobs broke every segment into 3 parts, and his product demos into 3 features. Narrow your message to its core and build your presentation around the 3 pivotal ways your product solves your customers’ problems.
 
5. Introduce the villain.
Jobs was brilliant at telling the audience what problems they were facing with current technology. In your presentation, create empathy by spelling out how your audience’s problems impact their lives in a negative way.
 
6. Reveal the conquering hero.
Now that you’ve established a problem to overcome, introduce the solution – your hero. While the hero needn’t have to slay the competitor, it must improve your audience’s lives in some way.
 
7. Keep it simple, stupid.
Convert your data and numbers into a tangible language. When Jobs launched the iPod, he didn’t introduce it with engineering specs. Instead, he pulled the device out of his pocket and told the audience that it holds “their entire music collection”.
 
8. Practice makes perfect.
It also makes your presentation look effortless. Prior to launching a new product, Jobs spent weeks rehearsing on stage. He knew every detail of every demo and every font on every slide. Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse. And then toss the script.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Unconventional business cards on every day objects will reinforce branding recognition. #branding #businesscards
View original post
1
Add a comment...
 
In need of some keyboard shortcuts? 
Download for free! 
 
Idea seed's MS Office Keyboard Shortcuts - Word 

We know what it’s like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can’t remember what it is.

We’re here to help you so we’ve created a handy list of the most useful shortcuts.

Today, we’re covering MS Office Word, but we have PowerPoint and Excel coming up.

Download the pdf for it here.
We know what it's like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can't remember what it is. We're here to help you so we've created a handy list
View original post
1
Add a comment...
 
 
Idea seed's MS Office Keyboard Shortcuts - Word 

We know what it’s like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can’t remember what it is.

We’re here to help you so we’ve created a handy list of the most useful shortcuts.

Today, we’re covering MS Office Word, but we have PowerPoint and Excel coming up.

Download the pdf for it here.
We know what it's like when you want a MS Office keyboard shortcut, but just can't remember what it is. We're here to help you so we've created a handy list
View original post
2
1
Georgie Cousens's profile photo
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
Designing your bid proposal – are there any traps to avoid?

4 traps to avoid when putting together a bid proposal

The bid and tender writing process is a complex and difficult one, in which you can easily lose sight of what’s most important to get across. The request for proposal (RFP) documents are often lengthy and it feels like they ask the same question in different ways over and over again. This makes it difficult for you to truly understand what the client is looking for. To top it all off, often the bid writing process comes with a tight time-schedule and lots of pressure. To help you wade through the mess, we’ve put together the most common mistakes that are made when producing a proposal:

Not answering the question asked: Probably the most important part of any bid or tender is to answer the questions. Seems obvious, but you’d be surprised by the number of people who miss this entirely. There’s usually a lot of content to be covered in a bid or tender application, but at the same time this content should be very concise and precise.  The readers – like you – are busy people who will only want to read the essential information. And if you start straying from answering the questions they’ve asked, you will automatically be rejected due to not complying with the requirements.

Forgetting you’re an expert: You’re the expert in your field. You work with whatever you do every day. You know your stuff! Chances are, though, that the reader of your tender is not an expert (otherwise you wouldn’t be needed). Which means you need to be selective with jargon and industry-specific language, unless you know for sure that it’s required. It does sound a bit harsh, but don’t overestimate the knowledge of your reader. If they don’t know what you’re talking about, they most likely won’t choose you as their service provider.

“Copy and Paste”: As mentioned before, you more often than not will find yourself under a lot of pressure with a tight deadline. Especially if you are writing multiple proposals at the same time. The temptation is to copy and paste certain sections and reuse them in each tender application. But beware. If you do this badly it’s easily spotted by trained eyes, like those members of the selection committee! The other danger when reusing content is the chances are significantly higher that errors will sneak in and you will stray from answering the correct questions. Of course a lot of the things mentioned in different applications will be very similar if not identical, such as your company information, so use those, but be wary of copying other material that may not answer a specific question.

Not being consistent about a “theme”: It is very important to not stray from your “theme”. Your focus may be that you offer the lowest cost of the service/product. Or maybe you offer the most value. Or your product is truly the most innovative. Whatever your main theme is – focus on it, don’t stray. Of course we want to be able to do all of the above, but unfortunately we can’t. So pick one thing that will lift you up from the crowd and get you ahead in the selection process.

If you’re completely ​overwhelmed​ by all the things that can go seriously wrong in the bid and tender writing process, get in touch with us. We’re here to help 24/7 and​ are well versed in how to ensure you’re submission is successful.
1
Add a comment...

Georgie Cousens

Shared publicly  - 
 
Presentation tips to inspire your audience.
1
Add a comment...
People
Work
Occupation
Creative Director & Owner, Ideaseed | Design specialists bringing your documents, pitches & presentations to life.
Skills
Creative Direction, Graphic Design, Graphics, Adobe Creative Suite, PowerPoint, Logo Design, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Office, Animation, InDesign
Employment
  • Ideaseed
    Owner, 2008 - present
    Ideaseed was founded in 2008 after many years working for major multinationals. I could see how much pressure people face under deadline and budget, and wanted to banish boring presentations and dry pitches and tenders forever. I also know first-hand how a well-designed and user-friendly MS Office template can make life simpler, so unlike other creative agencies, taking care of the basics has become our specialty. http://ideaseed.com.au/
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New South Wales, 2576, Australia
Contact Information
Home
Phone
+61 2 9432 7872
Email
Address
133 Alexander Street Crows Nest, Sydney
Work
Phone
+61 2 9432 7872
Email
Address
133 Alexander Street Crows Nest, Sydney
Story
Tagline
Creative Director & Owner, Ideaseed | Design specialists bringing your documents, pitches & presentations to life
Introduction
WHAT I DO..

At Ideaseed my mission is to make my clients look amazing, and our team is known for coming to the rescue at the eleventh hour - making the impossible possible.

Think it can’t be done? We love a challenge - we've turned an iPad app around in three days!

Likes: My family, my friends and yes even my clients!
Dislikes: Lets not talk creepy crawlies shall we.
Bragging rights
I am living the dream - honestly!
Education
  • Ogilvy & Mather's Red and Yellow School of Advertising, Copywriting and Design
    Advertising and Design
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Looking for
Networking
Links
Contributor to
Links