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Danny Ramirez
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Visual Artist. A.K.A. dadapoet
Visual Artist. A.K.A. dadapoet

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Completed Hard Hat...Lawson Group Architects-Sarasota, Fl 2018(c)
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3/15/18
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3/15/18
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We are Wynwood...Concrete Hard Hats.....
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“We Are Wynwood” Building for the Future....2018(c)
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3/15/18
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"We Are Wynwood” Cultivation & Urbanity 2018
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In 2003 a group of art dealers, artists and curators Mark Coetzee, Nina Arias and Nick Cindric set to create the “Wynwood Art District”. Mark Coetzee initiated the idea based on a similar project, Art Night, which he started in his hometown, Cape Town, South Africa. Founding members at the first meeting in Rocket Projects media room were Brook Dorsch of Dorsch Gallery, Weston Charles, Cooper and Elizabeth Withstandley of Locust Projects, Mark Coetzee of the Rubell Collection, Nina Arias and Nick Cindric of Rocket Projects, Bernice Steinbaum of Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, and Marina Kessler of Marina Kessler Gallery. The association created the Second Saturdays Gallery Walk, designed the Manhole cover logo along with the light banners that hang on street corners, and publishes annual brochures with a map and a list of the association's members.
Inspired by the now iconic “Wynwood-Art District Manhole Cover” of 2003, I would begin a new series of work for 2018 entitled “We Are Wynwood”. I wanted to embody our local diverse Wynwood community, which has transitioned from a primarily Puerto Rican society into today’s commercial art mega market.
The series launched by taking the iconic manhole cover; re-imagining the concept using the different national flags. It was these communities from the late 60’s and/or the early 70’s who would lay Wynwood’s foundation.
Without the sustainability and longevity formed by these families, Wynwood today would not be “Wynwood”. By honoring those who where here once, but are no longer here now (including the artist), we can remember Wynwood’s roots.
As Wynwood’s financial market continues to grow, many artists have since moved North to the Little Haiti areas. These areas are now set-up to duplicate Wynwood in the future, thus the trend will continue in these areas as well. “Little Haiti” as named for decades by all local residents alike, has been recently renamed too “The Lemon District”. Originally this area was designated “The Lemon District” by the City of Miami; over time it unofficially became “Little Haiti”. Sometimes identifying these markers for its rich history establishes identity. Why not permanently designate this area officially as “Little Haiti”?
Nonetheless, with transition come change and then an influx of Latin American and European families into the region. Wynwood is now a melting pot for artists, for all nationalities and for old and new residents alike. During my time here in Wynwood I have also observed the diversity in economical lifestyles. You have a wealthier base group now integrated into a working class-type artistic community. One can walk into the Target at Midtown and easily see this interaction, including many homeless still living in and around the midtown areas. Its interesting to me how many individuals whom would normally live in areas such as Doral, Coral Gables, Miami Lakes, Miami Beach, now find refuge here in Wynwood. These families have accepted Wynwood into their hearts and financially this is beneficial
for all Wynwood business’s
There seems to be a complex mix of “Cultivation and Urbanity” here in Wynwood which makes living here so unique.
Add the construction worker into this unique situation. It’s hard not to notice a group of men wearing yellow “hard hats” crossing North Miami Ave every each morning. They have also become part of everyday life here at Wynwood.
As new condos continue to expand (both vertically and horizontally), the construction worker has also joined this cultural clash.
Many of these men and/or children of permanent Wynwood residents are taking part in Wynwoods’s expansion. Ultimately these men are shaping and physically changing Wynwood’s landscape one brick at a time.
During lunchtime, these men help sustain the economy by eating in the different local restaurants and at the local culinary food trucks. These guys are from all nationalities and of all “walks of life”. They are part of Wynwood’s current state of affair. They are Wynwood. This is Wynwood’s Art District.

We are all Wynwood.
“We Are Wynwood”
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