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AIDS Clinical Trials Group
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Want to learn about the latest #HIV  research being conducted by ACTG researchers? Watch this video featuring investigators from one of our Boston site's discussing what they are currently working on in the lab!
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In this week's World Wednesday post we look at our International Vice Chair Dr. Ian Sanne's work fighting #Ebola  in Africa. In addition to being an investigator with the ACTG, Dr. Sanne runs Right to Care in South Africa. Right to Care is looking for applicants willing to work in Sierra Leone for three months to treat people with Ebola. Dr. Sanne says this would be meaningful experience, especially if the disease ever comes to South Africa.
Healthcare workers are being recruited in South Africa for a mission to Sierra Leone to help with the Ebola outbreak, non-profit organisation Right to Care said.
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Have you ever wondered what inspired your physician to pursue a career caring for people living with #HIV  and researching new treatments? Watch this video of our Network Chair Dr. Dan Kuritzkes along with Drs. Jonathan Li, Tim Henrich and Athe Tsibris sharing what attracted them to the field.
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#Pharmacists monitor #HIV patients' adherence to meds & check for drug interactions http://ow.ly/FNug9
The role of pharmacists in HIV care across ambulatory care settings is expanding.
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Dr. Igho Ofotokun grew up in Nigeria. He says watching women living with #HIV  come to the local clinic seeking treatment so that they could continue caring for their children inspired him to become a doctor and specialize in women's health. Read more about him in our December newsletter!

https://actgnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ACTGUpdateDec2014NewsletterFINAL2.pdf
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Good example of GP.
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In this week's World Wednesday post, our Dr. Aida Asmelash from our Botswana sites conducted a study investigating why African women taking anti-HIV medications can suppress #HIV , but still not see a CD4 cell recovery. She learned that older age and co-infections are factors that influence immune restoration. Read more in our December newsletter.

https://actgnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ACTGUpdateDec2014NewsletterFINAL2.pdf
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Our international investigators are leading studies researching better anti- #HIV  medications and tuberculosis treatment. They are also exploring if text message reminders will improve medication adherence. Read more about these exciting studies in our December newsletter!

https://actgnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ACTGUpdateDec2014NewsletterFINAL2.pdf
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Chronic non-communicable illnesses like diabetes and heart disease kill people living with #HIV , not the virus itself, researchers say. They suggest regular screening for chronic diseases and management of risk factors to prevent negative health outcomes. 
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BUTCH MATTHEWS's profile photoCentral Clinical School, Monash University's profile photo
 
Cell-Associated HIV Mucosal Transmission: The Neglected Pathway
in News Releases
December 18th, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 18, 2014
Contact: Gina DiGravio, 617-638-8480, ginad@bu.edu
(Boston)—Dr. Deborah Anderson from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and her colleagues are challenging dogma about the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Most research has focused on infection by free viral particles, while this group proposes that HIV is also transmitted by infected cells. While inside cells, HIV is protected from antibodies and other antiviral factors, and cell-to-cell virus transmission occurs very efficiently through intercellular synapses. The Journal of Infectious Diseases (JID) has devoted their December supplement to this important and understudied topic.
The 10 articles, four from researchers at BUSM, present the case for cell-associated HIV transmission as an important element contributing to the HIV epidemic.  Anderson chides fellow researchers for not using cell-associated HIV in their transmission models: “The failure of several recent vaccine and microbicide clinical trials to prevent HIV transmission may be due in part to this oversight.”
Approximately 75 million people in the world have been infected with HIV-1 since the epidemic started over 30 years ago, mostly through sexual contact and maternal-to-child transmission.  A series of vaccine and microbicide clinical trials to prevent HIV transmission have been unsuccessful, and scientists are returning to the drawing board to devise new approaches. The JID supplement advocates for new strategies that target HIV-infected cells in mucosal secretions.
The publication presents evidence that HIV-infected cells populate genital secretions from HIV-infected men and women as well as breast milk, and genetic evidence suggesting that cell-associated HIV transmission occurs in people. Various models for studying cell-associated HIV transmission and molecular targets for intervention are also presented. Finally, the efficacy of current HIV prevention strategies against cell-associated HIV transmission and opportunities for further development are described.
The collaborative team of BUSM researchers includes Drs. Deborah Anderson, Joseph Politch and Jai Marathe from the Departments of OB/GYN and Medicine, Manish Sagar from the Department of Medicine and Rahm Gummuluru from the Department of Microbiology. Collaborators include Drs. Roger LeGrand and Natalie DeJucq-Rainsford from France, Julie Overbaugh from the University of Washington, Tom Moench and Richard Cone from Johns Hopkins University, Kevin Whaley from Mapp Biopharmaceutical and Kenneth Mayer from Harvard Medical School. It is their hope that these articles will help to inform and invigorate the HIV prevention field and contribute to the development of more effective vaccine, treatment, and microbicide strategies for HIV prevention.
Funding was provided by the US National Institutes of Health (grant U19 AI096398) and the
Fond de Dotation Pierre Berge, Sidation, France.
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Dr. Diane Havlir leads our University of San Francisco HIV/AIDS Clinical Research Site. She is also one of the co-founders of the city's Getting to Zero Coalition. The group aims to make San Francisco the first jurisdiction with zero new #HIV  infections, zero stigma and zero deaths!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mehroz-baig/how-san-francisco-is-getting-to-zero-on-hiv_b_6290636.html?utm_hp_ref=san-francisco&ir=San+Francisco
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All thanks to dr lawcy, I am wendy Linus from uk, England, I am here to share a good testimony of my self on how a good, great and real spell caster helped me. I appreciate everyone for taken their precious time to read my testimony, 3 months ago I was diagnosed of hiv, this means that 3months ago I was hiv positive when I told one of my good friend about this, she sympathized with me and then she said that she was going to help me out, she introduced me to one great spell caster and she said that this spell caster has remedy to all illness, I was really surprised on this and confused as well, then I told the spell caster to help me and he prepared some herbs for me and send it across to me and he told me the way I was going to be taken the medicine which I did, and in the next 2 weeks I went to the hospital and they said that I am now hiv negative, I am very happy about this, when I contacted dr lawcy again to tell him the good result , I asked him how he was able to help me, and he said that he was gifted with it that he can cure illness like.
1 cancer
2 hiv
3 low sperm count.
4 barrenness
5 herpes
6 hpv
7 gonorrheal
8 sti (sexually transmitted infection).
9 std (sexually transmitted disease).
10 stroke
this are few that I can mention right now, this man is a very great, good and powerful dr, all thanks to him for given me a second chance, if you are out there passing through any problem, you can contact him today on his email on drlawcyspellhome@gmail.com, and I know that he will help you also. once again help me to thank dr lawcy for given me a second chance.
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MRI technique identifies #HIV associated cognitive decline before symptoms occur http://ow.ly/FNtP0
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Wendy Linus's profile photoCentral Clinical School, Monash University's profile photo
 
All thanks to dr lawcy, I am wendy Linus from uk, England, I am here to share a good testimony of my self on how a good, great and real spell caster helped me. I appreciate everyone for taken their precious time to read my testimony, 3 months ago I was diagnosed of hiv, this means that 3months ago I was hiv positive when I told one of my good friend about this, she sympathized with me and then she said that she was going to help me out, she introduced me to one great spell caster and she said that this spell caster has remedy to all illness, I was really surprised on this and confused as well, then I told the spell caster to help me and he prepared some herbs for me and send it across to me and he told me the way I was going to be taken the medicine which I did, and in the next 2 weeks I went to the hospital and they said that I am now hiv negative, I am very happy about this, when I contacted dr lawcy again to tell him the good result , I asked him how he was able to help me, and he said that he was gifted with it that he can cure illness like.
1 cancer
2 hiv
3 low sperm count.
4 barrenness
5 herpes
6 hpv
7 gonorrheal
8 sti (sexually transmitted infection).
9 std (sexually transmitted disease).
10 stroke
this are few that I can mention right now, this man is a very great, good and powerful dr, all thanks to him for given me a second chance, if you are out there passing through any problem, you can contact him today on his email on drlawcyspellhome@gmail.com, and I know that he will help you also. once again help me to thank dr lawcy for given me a second chance.
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Dr. Johnstone Kumwenda from our research site in Blantyre, Malawi, is conducting our first study into malaria and HIV. He will test the protease inhibitor class of #HIV  medications to see if this is a safer and more effective means of curing malaria in people living with HIV. Read more about his study and where it is enrolling in our December newsletter.

https://actgnetwork.org/sites/default/files/ACTGUpdateDec2014NewsletterFINAL2.pdf
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Central Clinical School, Monash University's profile photo
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When a lifelong friend's husband was diagnosed with #HIV , Vicki Bailey was inspired to attend nursing school and specialize in caring for people living with HIV. She's been a research nurse at our Vanderbilt site in Nashville for 14 years. Read more about her work at the link below.
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People
Have them in circles
507 people
Golden Legion's profile photo
Mahdi Hatamipour's profile photo
M.E. Director's profile photo
OtriMed's profile photo
bob robert's profile photo
Rae Lewis-Thornton's profile photo
Jason Gregory's profile photo
Alternatives to Mainstream Health's profile photo
Anjali kudiarasi's profile photo
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To develop and conduct HIV research and clinical trials
Introduction

Established in 1987 to broaden the scope of the AIDS research effort of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), under the National Institutes of Health's (NIH), the ACTG has developed into the largest HIV/AIDS research network in the world with sites across the USA and Sub-Saharan Africa, and select sites in Asia and the Caribbean and Latin America. Since 1989, community advocates have consistently been involved with HIV clinical research.


We enjoy hearing your feedback and welcome relevant, insightful comments and discussions. Please be respectful and stay on topic. We reserve the right to delete profane, harassing, abusive, off-topic, spam, comments or posts that solicit medical advice, user content that is derogatory or offensive to ACTG personnel, and to block repeat offenders.