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James Williamson
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Outdoorsy cove based in Norfolk U.K. Nature. Landscape. Wildlife. History. #BrecksHeritageSafari
Outdoorsy cove based in Norfolk U.K. Nature. Landscape. Wildlife. History. #BrecksHeritageSafari

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Are you looking for a day out with a difference? Would you like to explore the countryside of Norfolk and Suffolk, discovering how the landscape was formed? If the answer is yes to either of these questions the Breckland Landscape and Heritage Tours are just what you are looking for.

Your tour will explore the ruined castles, churches, warren lodges and ancient heaths that make this region of Norfolk and Suffolk unique.

Starting and finishing at Elveden village, you’ll travel with your guide in a fully licensed Land Rover Defender and follow a route through the core of Breckland's rich and diverse heritage.

From WW1 tank testing to medieval rabbit farming, your day will unlock the landscape's most fascinating stories.

Each tour lasts 6-7 hours.
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Are you looking for a day out with a difference? Would you like to explore the countryside of Norfolk and Suffolk, discovering how the landscape was formed? If the answer is yes to either of these questions the Breckland Landscape and Heritage Tours are just what you are looking for.

Your tour will explore the ruined castles, churches, warren lodges and ancient heaths that make this region of Norfolk and Suffolk unique.

Starting and finishing at Elveden village, you’ll travel with your guide in a fully licensed Land Rover Defender and follow a route through the core of Breckland's rich and diverse heritage.

From WW1 tank testing to medieval rabbit farming, your day will unlock the landscape's most fascinating stories.

Each tour lasts 6-7 hours.
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A highlight of Norfolk's wildlife watching year is undoubtedly the arrival of tens-of-thousands of pink-footed geese. They arrive during late September and numbers gradually swell during October until over 100,000 of them are present during suitable winters. Having made the trip from Iceland and Greenland, where they breed, the grey geese are here for one reason only: to gorge themselves on the sugar beet stubble left over after the crop has been lifted during harvest.
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The Brecklands of Norfolk and Suffolk are a landscape like no other in the British Isles. Once much more open and desert-like, the introduction of a commercial forestry plantation at the beginning of the last century changed the area's character beyond former recognition -- many would say for the better. Remnants of yesteryear's open vistas can still be found, as well as the Scot's pine belts that immediately identify the landscape. 
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For Norfolk's birdwatchers and twitchers alike, the glimpse of a crossbill often gets chalked-up as a notable sighting, particularly during the summer months. However, wintertime is often the best season to get good views, particularly if weather conditions on the continent are very cold, driving these robust and colourful finches south towards western and southern Europe. Here they will mix with resident Breckland crossbills, some of which might be preparing to nest towards the end of January.   
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If they haven't left already, they'll be thinking about it -- northern Africa will be foremost in their minds. The stone curlew is a migratory bird, arriving in Norfolk during late March and increasing in numbers as April progresses. Once the summer's breeding is out of the way, pre-migratory flocks will gather on remote Breckland heaths: possibly the best chance a naturalist will get to observe these birds closely. But be quick, they won't be here much longer...
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They're the largest land-living native mammal to be found on British shores and October sees the red deer display a very different side of their character, far removed from the placid, cud-chewing beast of high summer. The stags are charged with testosterone and responsible for making a gutteral, primordial burling clamour that reverberates across the heaths and pine plantations of the Norfolk Brecklands during October. Winning females is the name of the game, with the stags controlling harems of 20 hinds or more during the 2 - 3 week duration of the rut.  
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The changing shapes and hues of a broad-leaved woodland are never more obvious than during the autumn. As the animals living amongst the branches and understorey turn their attention towards eating as much food as possible with the intention of fattening-up for winter, the leaves and sunlight passing through them change colour and form by the minute, making a stroll through this type of habitat a must-do at this time of year.
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We all gotta' eat, and that means farming on a very large scale nowadays. However, this doesn't mean that we can't produce enough food for ourselves and still live in harmony with our natural suroundings. Although Norfolk is an intensively farmed landscape, it still has much to offer in terms of aesthetic beauty and environmental importance. The next time you're whizzing about in the countryside, it's well worth pausing for a moment or two to take-in the big skies and open scenery.
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They're more numerous than one might think, sticking to their nocturnal routine like limpets on a ship's hull, but badgers are alive and kicking (and digging) in the most wooded parts of Norfolk, going about their nightly routines in surprisingly secretive ways considering their bulk and robustness. Even knowing where they dwell doesn't guarantee a sighting: it can take many weeks of quiet observation before they reveal their elusive lifestyle: http://www.norfolknaturesafari.co.uk/Badger.html
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