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Space Weather and Radio Propagation
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Space Weather and Radio Signal Propagation - NW7US / SunSpotWatch.com
Space Weather and Radio Signal Propagation - NW7US / SunSpotWatch.com

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Space Weather and Radio Propagation's posts

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We need patrons for SunSpotWatch.com - working on two projects http://nw7us.us/patron #hamr #SolarStorm
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Read it now: the official International Shortwave Broadcast Guide with my article, "Crash Course of Shortwave Propagation and Space Weather" - This book is now on Amazon.

Here is my short link to the Amazon Kindle page:

http://g.nw7us.us/isbgw2016

#SpaceWX #SpaceWeather #Propagation #ionosphere #science #hamradio #hamr #ARRL

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A Nuclear Fusion Light Show -- The Sun in 4k-UHD!

The Sun is a main-sequence star, and thus generates its energy by nuclear fusion of hydrogen nuclei into helium. In its core, the Sun fuses 620 million metric tons of hydrogen each second.

The sun is always changing and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory is always watching. Launched on February 11, 2010, SDO keeps a 24-hour eye on the entire disk of the sun, with a prime view of the graceful dance of solar material coursing through the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

SDO captures images of the sun in 10 different wavelengths, each of which helps highlight a different temperature of solar material. Different temperatures can, in turn, show specific structures on the sun such as solar flares, which are gigantic explosions of light and x-rays, or coronal loops, which are stream of solar material travelling up and down looping magnetic field lines.

Scientists study these images to better understand the complex electromagnetic system causing the constant movement on the sun, which can ultimately have an effect closer to Earth, too. Flares and another type of solar explosion called coronal mass ejections can sometimes disrupt technology in space. Moreover, studying our closest star is one way of learning about other stars in the galaxy. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. built, operates, and manages the SDO spacecraft for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C.

It is widely believed that the Sun's magnetic field is generated by electrical currents acting as a magnetic dynamo inside the Sun. These electrical currents are generated by the flow of hot, ionized gases in the Sun's convection zone.

We know a lot about the Sun's magnetic dynamo. It has a 22 year cycle. During the first half of the cycle, the Sun's magnetic north pole is in the northern hemisphere while the magnetic south pole is in the southern hemisphere. Right around the peak of the sunspot cycle (solar maximum), the magnetic poles flip or exchange places so that magnetic north is now located in the southern hemisphere. This flip occurs about every 11 years at solar maximum.

The 22 year magnetic cycle greatly influences the most prominent manifestation of the dynamo, sunspots and active regions, which migrate towards the solar equator from high latitudes over the course of the solar 11 year "sunspot cycle". Sunspots and Active Regions are manifestation of the magnetic field generated in the Sun's interior poking through the visible region of the atmosphere. Active regions are responsible for the production of intense and violent energy burst, called flares, and events where very large amounts of hot gas, trapped by the magnetic field of the active region, are released from the Sun's atmosphere and into space, called coronal mass ejections (CMEs).

Watch the movie, now! Here's the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sq4PlyNkm2Y

Credit: The SDO Team, Genna Duberstein and Scott Wiessinger, Producers

1st music:
The Big Decision by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/

Then:

Light Awash by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100175
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

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This cool video (in ultra-high definition 3840x2160 - 4k on YouTube) shows the Sun during the entire year, 2015. The video captures the Sun in the 171-angstrom wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Our naked, unaided eyes cannot see this, but this movie uses false-colorization (yellow/gold) so that we can watch in high definition.

The movie covers a time period of January 2, 2015 to January 28, 2016 at a cadence of one frame every hour, or 24 frames per day. This timelapse is repeated with narration by solar scientist Nicholeen Viall and contains close-ups and annotations. The 171-angstrom light highlights material around 600,000 Kelvin and shows features in the upper transition region and quiet corona of the sun.

The sun is always changing and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory is always watching. Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, SDO keeps a 24-hour eye on the entire disk of the sun, with a prime view of the graceful dance of solar material coursing through the sun's atmosphere, the corona. SDO's sixth year in orbit was no exception. This video shows that entire sixth year--from Jan. 1, 2015 to Jan. 28, 2016 as one time-lapse sequence. Each frame represents 1 hour.

SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) captures a shot of the sun every 12 seconds in 10 different wavelengths. The images shown here are based on a wavelength of 171 angstroms, which is in the extreme ultraviolet range and shows solar material at around 600,000 Kelvin (about 1 million degrees F.) In this wavelength it is easy to see the sun's 25-day rotation.

During the course of the video, the sun subtly increases and decreases in apparent size. This is because the distance between the SDO spacecraft and the sun varies over time. The image is, however, remarkably consistent and stable despite the fact that SDO orbits Earth at 6,876 mph and the Earth orbits the sun at 67,062 miles per hour.

Scientists study these images to better understand the complex electromagnetic system causing the constant movement on the sun, which can ultimately have an effect closer to Earth, too: Flares and another type of solar explosion called coronal mass ejections can sometimes disrupt technology in space. Moreover, studying our closest star is one way of learning about other stars in the galaxy. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. built, operates, and manages the SDO spacecraft for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C.

Please up-vote the video on Reddit, too:
https://www.reddit.com/r/EverythingScience/comments/4arpxn/oneyears_worth_an_intimate_view_of_our_sun_uhd/?ref=share&ref_source=link

Thanks for sharing, voting, and watching!


Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgP0e1VHBxc

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UPDATE: Geomagnetic conditions settling down to normal (quiet) conditions, today.

The Current Space Weather Observation at 2015 Dec 21 15:30 UTC: 10.7-cm Radio Flux 117 / Ap 66, Kp 3, Sunspot Count 33 (as of 12/20/2015)

Solar Wind 501 km/s Bz: 4.2 nT (northward orientation - this is why the geomagnetic conditions are improving).

Space weather for the past 24 hours has been moderate. Geomagnetic storms reaching the G2 level occurred. Radio blackouts reaching the R1 level occurred.

No space weather storms are predicted for the next 24 hours.

Flares: (0000 UTC) 6h hi M2.8(0052Z 12/21) 24h hi M2.8(0052Z 12/21)

Global HF Propagation Cndx 1500Z 21 Dec, 2015: Hi Lat=Fair: Mid Lat=Normal: Low Lat=Normal

FYI: Year-end Ham Radio and Space Weather Education Course Sale! Now is the perfect time to get this course for yourself, or to gift it. This sale is a great bargain!

Get the space weather and radio propagation self-study course, today. Visit http://nw7us.us/swc for the latest sale and for more information!

http://g.nw7us.us/1kLOrZP

#spaceweather #sunspots #solar #flares #aurora #hamr #ARRL #spacewx #solarstorm

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Click: http://nw7us.us/swc

Interested in space weather? Learn this science & apply it to ham radio and shortwave... or just learn something awesome about the Sun, the Sun-Earth connection, and more!


#spaceweather #learn #science #hamradio #swl #ARRL #solarstorm #astronomy #hamr #education #sun #solar #flare #plasma #SDO #SOHO #NASA


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I'm NW7US, and I write about radio propagation and space weather, every month.  My latest column about space weather and radio is now published in the November 2015 edition of "The Spectrum Monitor" -- and my column is there for your reading.  Did you get your copy?  Here's the link:  http://www.thespectrummonitor.com/
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Amateur radio HF-related propagation self-study course, presented by the contributing editor for CQ Magazine's propagation column:
http://sunspotwatch.com/swc/

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I'm +NW7US,  and I have been writing the radio propagation and space weather column in CQ Amateur Radio Magazine since 2002, and was also the columnist for the same topic in Popular Communications Magazine and CQ VHF Quarterly.  I also write, currently, for The Spectrum Monitor, covering these topics.

I'm often asked if there's a good technical resource that teaches about space weather and how that influences the ionospheric propagation of radio wave.  And, how do you analyze and forecast space weather and radio wave propagation?  Should I do my "Honey-do" list, or head up to the mountaintop to work DX, this weekend?

Here's an option: Learn all about space weather with the space weather and ionospheric radio wave propagation course. Explore:

http://sunspotwatch.com/swc/

Thank you for taking a look.  The proceeds go toward keeping http://SunSpotWatch.com and http://HFRadio.org alive for everyone's benefit.
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