Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Charles Pratt
616 followers
616 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
"The mobile strategy game Clash of Clans is a game of bad AI."
300 Word Reviews
300 Word Reviews
threehundredwordreviews.tumblr.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Commandos is one of my favorite games, and a great example of a really neglected genre: the squad-based action puzzler.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Submitted without comment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Hey all, finally posted our interview with Mike Treanor on Another Castle. We talk about a lot of subjects that are dear to my heart, such as practice and meaning. Thanks to Mike and everyone for the patience!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Hi all!

So a little while back my friend Noah and I resuscitated our podcast of long form interviews with folks in the NY game scene and beyond.

We just posted a new episode with Sande Chen, a writer and game designer that's worked on a couple of big projects, such as The Witcher, and has played a big part in solidifying the NY community.

If you like it you should also check out our other interviews with folks like Simon Ferrari, Richard Lemarchand, +Mark Essen, Steve Gaynor, and Adam Saltsman!

As always, feedback is appreciated!
Add a comment...

Lawyer friends (meaning +Kirk Battle and +Brian Creeden) assemble!

I'm fascinated by the debt compromise, in which both parties have to put forth members of a committee to reach an agreement on the budget, but if they don't then the money comes directly out of two programs that both parties value.

I know that we often have laws that have a punishment if they aren't followed, but how often do we have laws that go in and out of effect depending on circumstances? What scale are they usually at?

The reason I ask is because my sense if that we often have laws that must be obeyed, that are static prescriptions, but we don't often have laws (or at least they're not very visible) that present options.

Is there a sense of a difference between these two types of laws in legal theory, or is it the sort of Hobbesian idea that even a law that will kill you if you don't follow it still presents an option?
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
So, it's stuff like this that makes me take something of a skeptical stance to Bogost's recent work.

We don't do things with games. Games are what we do with things.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I think the problem I have with Ian's piece is that he talks about games as if they're 'things'. In other words, they're all made of the same material that we can form and shape how we want, but the material doesn't change. However, if you don't think of games as things, but as ways of doing things, then it makes perfect sense that certain things don't count as games, or maybe more accurately that any 'thing' counts as a game.

That's, I believe, what Ian and those he's supposedly disagreeing with both get wrong. Heavy Rain is just a prop. There are ways it can be used which I would argue are not games (perhaps even the behavior is was designed for), but there are definitely ways to use it where it resembles a game or puzzle. For instance, my own attempts at a low interaction run.

Whether or not single player will disappear seems beside the point. I think they're legitimate games, as legitimate as playing golf by yourself or running a mile to beat your best time, and I don't think they're going anywhere.

The real question is whether we think of "video games" as practices and social institutions but with particular objects that have traditions of use, or if we think of "video games" as a genre of interactive technology.

In the latter case Ian has a great point that I can't disagree with, and in the former he's not wrong, but he is off topic.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded