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CCP Web Design
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CCP Web Design's posts

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https://vimeo.com/97634383
This guys is so funny!  Great use of time while stuck at airport!

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Why are Coders Angry - Excerpt from recent Paul Ford article on understanding code. 

"Languages have agendas. People glom onto them. Blunt talk is seen as a good quality in a developer, a sign of an “engineering mindset”—spit out every opinion as quickly as possible, the sooner to reach a technical consensus. Expect to be told you’re wrong; expect to tell other people they’re wrong. (Masculine anger, bluntly expressed, is part of the industry.)

Coding is a culture of blurters. This can yield fast decisions, but it penalizes people who need to quietly compose their thoughts, rewarding fast-twitch thinkers who harrumph efficiently. Programmer job interviews, which often include abstract and meaningless questions that must be answered immediately on a whiteboard, typify this culture. Regular meetings can become sniping matches about things that don’t matter. The shorthand term for that is “bikeshedding.” (Who cares what color the bike shed is painted? Well …)

Code culture is very, very broad, but the geographic and cultural core is the Silicon Valley engine of progress. The Valley mythologizes young geniuses with vast sums. To its credit, this culture works; to its shame, it doesn’t work for everyone.

At any moment some new thing could catch fire and disrupt the tribal ebb and flow. Instagram was written in Python and sold for $700 millionΔ, so Python had a moment of glory. The next mind-blowing app could show up, written in some new language—and start everyone taking that more seriously. Within 18 months your skills could be, if not quite valueless, suspect.

I was in a meeting once where someone said, “How long will it take to fix that?” One person, who’d been at the company for years, said, “Three months.” A new person, who’d just come from a world of rapidly provisioned cloud microservices, said, “Three minutes.” They were both correct. That’s how change enters into this world. Slowly at first, then on the front page of Hacker News.

Programmers carve out a sliver of cognitive territory for themselves and go to conferences, and yet they know their position is vulnerable. They get defensive when they hear someone suggest that Python is better than Ruby, because [insert 500-comment message thread here]. Is the next great wave swelling somewhere, and will it wash away Java when it comes? Will Go conquer Python? Do I need to learn JavaScript to remain profitable? Programmers are often angry because they’re often scared. We are, most of us, stumbling around with only a few candles to guide the way. We can’t always see the whole system, so we need to puzzle it out, bit by bit, in the dark.

Read the whole article here ... http://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-paul-ford-what-is-code/

If you updated your mobile web pages during "mobilgedeon" but Google has yet to re-index your pages use the Fetch & Submit in Google Webmaster Tools for a quick fix!

This excerpt from The Moral Buck List by David Brooks made me remember why I love Mother’s Day so much.  It’s not about me.  It’s about my beautiful gifts Alec and Abbie.

ENERGIZING LOVE Dorothy Day led a disorganized life when she was young: drinking, carousing, a suicide attempt or two, following her desires, unable to find direction. But the birth of her daughter changed her. She wrote of that birth, “If I had written the greatest book, composed the greatest symphony, painted the most beautiful painting or carved the most exquisite figure I could not have felt the more exalted creator than I did when they placed my child in my arms.”

That kind of love decenters the self. It reminds you that your true riches are in another. Most of all, this love electrifies. It puts you in a state of need and makes it delightful to serve what you love. Day’s love for her daughter spilled outward and upward. As she wrote, “No human creature could receive or contain so vast a flood of love and joy as I often felt after the birth of my child. With this came the need to worship, to adore.”

She made unshakable commitments in all directions. She became a Catholic, started a radical newspaper, opened settlement houses for the poor and lived among the poor, embracing shared poverty as a way to build community, to not only do good, but be good. This gift of love overcame, sometimes, the natural self-centeredness all of us feel.

Happy Mother’s Day

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For SEO's the answer is "the question".  Google continues to favor content that answers a users question.  Proof that they value that content is in their latest search experiment.  They recently started inserting "People also asked" section in organic search results.  This example is from Dan Barker.
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My favorite part of Thoreau's Life Without Principle  ...  "Pray, let us live without being drawn by dogs, Eskimo-fashion, tearing over hill and dale, and biting each other's ears."  Unearthed this fabulous essay the other night and am enjoying it once again. 

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For years I have been recommending Thumbtack.com for my clients in local market trades. Now it looks like Google will be providing a little competition on that playing field ... http://www.forbes.com/…/after-investing-in-a-local-service…/

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Sharing some beautiful new pics of our office this  morning!  Thanks to Google Photographer David Armory!
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