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Neptune Memorial Reef
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Memorialized cremation. Leave the planet a better place.
Memorialized cremation. Leave the planet a better place.

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So cute!
Get those cameras ready! The Nature Conservancy annual photo contest is going on now. Submit your photos today! http://nature.ly/MfUW76
Photo credit: © Franciso Laso, 2011 Finalist
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0 kn of wind by now on Molasses Reef. My kinda weather.... :-) !!!!
http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/data/Forecasts/FZUS52.KKEY.html
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Don't forget about Hands Across the Sand on August 4th!

What to do at Your Event on August 4:

STEP 1: Go to the beach at 11 AM in your time zone for one hour, rain or shine.

STEP 2: Join hands for 15 minutes at 12:00 PM in your time zone forming lines in the sand against oil drilling in your coastal waters. Yes to clean energy.

STEP 3: Leave only your footprints.

Click the link to find an event near you! 
http://handsacrossthesand.com/organize.php?state=Florida

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Have you seen in the the February 2011 edition of National Geographic?? Check it out here! 

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You know that announcement we told you would be coming? The word is out: An additional $80 million for Everglades restoration was announced today at our Disney Wilderness Preserve! Find out how this money will help farmers and ranchers conserve wetlands: http://nature.ly/ODy7VR
Northern Everglades photo © Carlton Ward Jr.
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Hmm... tastes like chicken
Caption this: http://to.pbs.org/OpvGGw

A tourist sits next to a sculpture of a shark in a shopping mall in Bangkok. 

(Photo by Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images)
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A very common fish that you'll see at Neptune Reef is the Bar Jack fish. 

Bar Jacks are a moderately large species, growing to a recorded maximum length of 69 cm, and a weight of 6.8 kg, but are commonly encountered at lengths of less than 40 cm.

Interestingly, a Bar Jack sometimes can have a foraging relationship with a Wrasse. For example, while foraging with a Wrasse, a Jack increases its prey detection levels, which is useful for a species that is more adept at pelagic hunting, allowing it to be more efficient at this less common mode of food gathering.

(Photo credit: Emily Sniffette)
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"Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air."

-- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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