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Josh Storey
114 followers -
Trying to be Mikey Walsh since 1986.
Trying to be Mikey Walsh since 1986.

114 followers
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There is nothing not to love about this:

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My new #NaNoWriMo  playlist:

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So, I'm doing NaNo, but I'm doing it my way.
1. I don't care much about hitting the 50k goal.  I care more about making sure I'm writing a substantial amount every damn day.
2. I don't care about getting a complete draft of a novel.  I care about making progress on my current work in progress.
3. I'm going to have fun with this.  It's not a chore, it's a lifestyle choice.

That said, I'll probably try posting "deleted scenes" like this one whenever I finish them.  This is just background.  Something I wrote to solidify the events in my head.  Check it out.

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Really insightful and thought-provoking article by Jeff Jarvis in the Guardian. (Hashtags added by me):

It has been said that #privacy is dead. Not so. It's #secrecy that is dying. Openness will kill it.

American and British spies undermined the secrecy and security of everyone using the internet with their efforts to foil #encryption . Then, Edward #Snowden foiled them by revealing what is perhaps – though we may never know – their greatest secret.

When I worried on Twitter that we could not trust encryption now, technologist Lauren Weinstein responded with assurances that it would be difficult to hide "backdoors" in commonly used #PGP encryption – because it is open-source.

Openness is the more powerful weapon. Openness is the principle that guides, for example, Guardian journalism. Openness is all that can restore trust in government and technology companies. And openness – in standards, governance, and ethics – must be the basis of technologists' efforts to take back the the net.

[...]

The agglomeration of data that makes us fear for our privacy is also what makes it possible for one doubting soul – one Manning or Snowden – to learn secrets. The speed of data that makes us fret over the the devaluation of facts is also what makes it possible for journalists' facts to spread before government can stop them. The essence of the Snowden story, then, isn't government's threat to privacy, so much as it is government's loss of secrecy.

Oh, it will take a great deal for government to learn that lesson. Its first response is to try to match a loss of secrecy with greater secrecy, with a war on the agents of openness: #whistleblowers and journalists and news organizations. President #Obama had the opportunity to meet Snowden's revelations – redacted responsibly by the Guardian – with embarrassment, apology, and a vow to make good on his promise of transparency. He failed.

But the agents of openness will continue to wage their war on secrecy.

[...]

This latest story demonstrates that the Guardian, now in partnership with the New York Times and ProPublica, as well as publications in Germany and Brazil that have pursued their own surveillance stories, will continue to report openly in spite of government acts of intimidation.

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You remind me of the babe... http://j.mp/12pHpPV
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On the one hand, it seems like a bunch of BS to skirt a FOIA request. On the other hand: government websites.
If this were in some dark Kubrick comedy, it'd be hilarious. But, since it actually appears to be the state of the world, I don't know if I should laugh, weep, or rage.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/nsa-says-it-cant-search-its-own-e-mails/

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Check out this video on YouTube:
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