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Anita Law
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Anita Law

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Thank you +Eli Fennell for "educating" us! :))
Newsflash - The sky will not fall! All that will happen is that gay people will now be entitled to the same right to marry as straight people. That's it. That's all.
 
U.S. Gay Marriage FAQ

With gay marriage now legal in all 50-states of the United States, some people may have questions. Here are some answers:

1) Do I Have to Get Gay Married Now?

No. You do not. Ever. Unless you want to.

2) Won't This Lead to Polygamy?

Not likely. SCOTUS ruled that same-sex couples deserve the same Due Process and Equal Protection rights as opposite-sex couples, interracial couples, etc... Their ruling requires only that the right of two consenting adults to marry not be limited by race, gender, sexuality, creed, etc... Subsequently, were a state to legalize Polygamy, they could not discriminate between one straight man marrying two straight women, one bi man marrying one straight woman and one gay man, one lesbian marrying two others, etc... However, as long as no one can enjoy the benefits of Polygamy (i.e. as long as it is equally illegal for everyone), Polygamy needn't be legalized.

3) Won't This Lead to People Marrying Animals?

sigh

No. No it won't. Because animals aren't people, cannot consent, and do not have Constitutional protections like the right to marry. Does that answer your question, Mister Santorum?

4) How Will This Affect My Straight Marriage and Family?

It won't. Unless maybe you're in denial about being in the closet, and this gives you the courage to come out.

5) Won't It Violate My Religious Rights to Have to Treat Gays as Equals?

No, it really, really won't. But don't worry, I'm sure you'll find some way to still treat them as lesser beings if you try hard enough.
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Here is my FAQ:    With gay marriage legal in all 50 states, do I have to like the four dissenting justices?      NO.
Do I have to get gay married now?   NO,   but you must get married to someone or something.  
Won't this lead to polygamy?   Yes,  if you live in Utah.  Otherwise,  no.
Won't this lead to marrying animals?   Yes it will...but the animals won't know the difference.
How will this affect my straight marriage and family?   Most marriages are not that straight anyway - many are curved.  
Won't It Violate My Religious Rights to Have to Treat Gays as Equals?   The world is not here to please and delight you -  If our existence offends you, so be it.     
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Love this!
A delicate hand twisted rope engagement and wedding band set. Center stone is 6.5 mm "forever Brilliant" Moissanite.The rings are 2.5 mm thick. Center Stones:  6.5 mm (equiv. 1 carat) brilliant cut Charles & Colvard "Forever Brilliant" Moissanite (equiv. G-H color, VVS1 clarity)Metal: 14K solid white gold. (can be ordered in rose or yellow gold too) This setting accommodates a .75 to 1.25 carat round diamond or gemstone, which is not included in...
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Let's hope the Supreme Court does the right thing. Since Gore v. Bush, the Court has become a far less respected institution which seems much more interested in politics than upholding legal principles. 
If the Supreme Court overturns the Affordable Care Act, it will first have to suspend its own settled approach to interpreting statutes.
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Pretty cool!
#history
170 years of American history in one amazing GIF | A Serious GIF
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Helllooo how are you dear 
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Definitely worth the read!
Both +Yonatan Zunger's comments and the article attached.
Please comment on the original post - I think it will be more productive.
 
A note before proceeding: This post is going to talk about some serious issues, and the linked article, even more so. This is a good one on which to stop and think carefully before replying, especially if it makes you angry. If it does -- and honestly, it should -- stop and ask yourself why it makes you angry, and how this shapes your perspective, before you comment. Because the heart of this post is not to advocate any policy, or to criticize anyone, or even to state a position: it's about listening to the stories of other people, and thinking about them. I'm not asking you to feel guilty, or justify yourself, or anything else: just to listen.


One of the most interesting things I've heard said in the wake of Ferguson (and unfortunately, I can't find the source to quote properly) was in response to the statement that "93% of blacks are killed by other blacks, so why are you so angry about Michael Brown and never talking about your own problem?" The response was that this is exactly like a foreigner saying, "99% of Americans are killed by other Americans, so why are you so angry about 9/11 and never talking about your own problem?"

I think that this response is quite profound, and it speaks to the fact that not all death is equivalent. And these deaths are inequivalent in an important fashion: ordinary murder happens for any number of reasons, and in almost all cases only creates a risk to the person actually murdered. (The few cases where there is a broader risk -- e.g., mass murders by someone opening fire in the street -- in fact likewise attract our attention quite broadly) But the death of a member of a community at the hands of a member of another community, especially when that other community has a history of violence against one's own community, represents a profound danger to all and sundry. And most importantly, if that death is not promptly censured by the other community, it's likely to be taken as approval of the action -- and other members of the second community are likely to remember this, and act with more freedom and violence.

I'm saying "community" and "other community" here, rather than "black" and "white," because this is true for more than one community. My own family history has been entirely shaped by this kind of violence, but the communities there were the Jews and the Christians; around the world, there are hundreds of other examples of this kind of dynamic as well. 

There is something important in common in every one of these cases. When you are a member of one of these communities, the threat of violence from a member of a different community is omnipresent and something that shapes every aspect of your life.

This is something that can be very hard to explain or understand if you haven't ever been on the receiving end of this. Being a member of a community which is considered a legitimate target for violence by another community shapes your entire life.

"What’d you do for your 16th birthday? Mine had me face down eating grass with a shotgun to my head."

In that context, I want to share this essay by +Ward A. The essay is angry; it's not an easy read. But it's worth reading because it's a snapshot of what it's like to grow up in a world shaped by this. I've chosen to share it not because its story is unusual, but because it isn't: if you talk to people who have grown up black in America, or in any other similar situation elsewhere, you hear this same story, over and over, with variations.

If you read my intro, or Ward's essay, you may be tempted to respond with "but that doesn't justify [X]!," or "So obviously, what they need to do is [Y]." That's not the point of this share. It's not meant to justify, it's not meant to advocate for any policy.

The reason I'm posting this is that, if you want to understand what life is like in the United States, and if you want to understand why Ferguson happened, you need to understand what the world looks like from this perspective. And if you want to learn what the world is like for other people, the single best thing you can do is to just listen to what they have to say, and acknowledge it, and file it in your mind. 

Nothing more is expected of you here: just to think.
I am the son of a black woman and a white man. Born in D.C. and raised on the border of Cleveland, Ohio. My town, Shaker…
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Anita Law

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It's hard to understand what goes on in the mind of a person who is dealing with long term depression.
Talent and success (at least objective success) are obviously not a deterrent to suicide. Four of these are brand new projects which #robinwilliams had just completed before his death but it was obviously not enough to keep him going.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-mn-robin-williams-last-days-20140813-story.html#page=1

RIP Mr. Williams. You have been one of my all time favorites and your genius will be sorely missed.

 
Here are all 101 of Robin Williams’ defining roles in one chart: http://ti.me/1yzUmTy
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Have her in circles
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Anita Law

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This is great.
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Go get-em!

#anonymous #isis #isil
Anonymous has just struck a massive blow against ISIS recruiting efforts. Hacktivists recently took control of dozens of Twitter and Facebook accounts that had been openly used by ISIS to expand their influence and recruit new members. The above video explains the attack was coordinated …
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What Absaloute Nonsense.

A few "Twits" who call themselves "Anonymous" hack some U.S. Proxy Army (ISIS) accounts and it's a Big Deal ?

Come off it. These guys are now Propaganda Agents and Hackers for the U.S. Government.

Give me some Hacks on G.C.H.Q, MI5, MI6, All British Covert Ops, Diplomatic cables from Britain. Then I'll take this seriously.

These Hacks came courtesy of the U.S. Government anyway.

This is dumb data from a few C.I.A. Operatives calling themselves ISIS.

Why are you telling me ?

WAKE UP !
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Very cool website for GIFs.
Vote for it with one simple click!

#GIF #GIFs #gif 
 
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This is a long read but should make some "super-capitalists" stop and think.  The article is written by a capitalist who knows that, contrary to some of the nonsense we have been fed, an economy is only as good as the ability of its middle class to prosper.
The twisted irony is, when you work more hours for less pay, you hurt not only yourself, you hurt the real economy by depressing wages, increasing unemployment and reducing demand and innovation. Ironically, when you earn less, and unemployment is high, it even hurts capitalists like me.
[President Obama] is hearing daily from corporate executives and lobbyists that raising your wages would be bad. For you. So he won’t, unless he hears from you—all of you—demanding the same fair overtime protections for today’s middle class that were once enjoyed by your parents.
Contact the White House. Do it for yourself. Or, at the very least, have the courtesy to do it for me. Because honestly, I’m beginning to run out of customers. 
Billionaire venture capitalist Nick Hanauer explains why today's middle class is feeling stuck, how that hurts the whole economy and what President Obama can do about it -- with a stroke of his executive pen.
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Great read.  Spot on.
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Yes!
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Very nice atmosphere and really good food! I had the roasted chicken, which was probably the best I've ever had. The salad was also great with a really tangy but light dressing. Noisy but fun. I would definitely recommend it for a group.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Good food. The salads are very nice. Outdoor seating is lovely.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Love the place - looks and feels like you ae in NYC. Food is very good.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
87 reviews
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Love this place. Cute, cozy, food is great. The pizzas are awesome. When I was there, we ordered some pizzas as appetizers. They were so good, we just ordered a few more with salad and called it a meal. Great wine to top it off!
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Great salads and Margarita pizza.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Really good food but expensive!
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago