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Dennis Dickerson, Jr
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I used tables in Word for my job aids….not as fancy, but definitely gets the job done!
Job Aid for Citations
Job Aid for Citations
docs.google.com

Am I the only one struggling trying to figure out how to use Mendeley? I cannot get anything to download. Does anyone prefer EndNote to Mendely?

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Sorry, group! The last link was invalid. Here is my first draft. I have changed it since then, but it's the same idea.

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Hey, everybody! This is my Research Interest Profile about what is lacking in the curriculum design of Tennessee public schools.

Good morning, class! My name is Dennis Dickerson, Jr. I am one of two Latin teachers at Christian Brothers High School here in Memphis. This is my second class in the IDT doctoral program. I look forward to continuing my growth in this class and beyond. I'm glad to see so many familiar faces from 7052 and am eager to meet new people in this course.

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Technology is a great tool for learning new languages! Spanish apps have really helped me communicate with my Cuba brother-in-law.

I think my job is safe because Latin is not spoken!
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This brings two things to mind for me:

1. Latin is one of the only languages that is rarely taught at a young age when it is proven that pre-middle school is a prime time for language acquisition.

2. My nephew has a Cuban father and I've always wondered how it is he can understand both parents equally well, but not be able to speak Spanish.

I also thought it was interesting how correcting a child really does nothing to help him/her learn the language more quickly!
Why It’s Easier for Children to Become Bilingual
http://goo.gl/d7bfvw

"The reason adults do not 'absorb' language by exposure alone is because of something that psycholinguists refer to as the 'critical period' of language development. Although it varies from person to person, adolescence is a good approximate cutoff, in that from as young as ten, and as late as the mid-teens, we lose our ability to acquire language without instruction the way children do. This is related to plasticity of the brain as it develops. Remarkably, although the spectrum of the critical period ends around adolescence, monolingual children generally complete the majority of the acquisition process by the age of three! There is always more vocabulary to acquire throughout childhood and life, but syntax (the order in which our words appear automatically when we speak, and in which they must do so in order to make sense to others) and other basic elements of linguistic grammar like phonology (sound patterns) and morphology (word components) are produced with ease before the end of preschool and toilet training! This is especially fast when you consider how complex and intricate human languages are. When children are exposed to a second language at four or five, they may still acquire it fluently if they get enough exposure to it, because that critical period of language development is still open."

"Adults have a very different experience. Most adults can learn a second language, but it requires great effort, work, time, energy, and memorization. Plus, some elements, like vocabulary or native-like pronunciation, may never be fully achieved by adult language-learners (adult acquisition is more like learning, so linguists may use that verb more to describe second language acquisition). For example, many English speakers learning Spanish have trouble rolling the double r, and Hindi has a d sound with a puff of air that many English speakers cannot even hear, let alone pronounce. You may speak another language at a rudimentary level, but never encounter thousands of low-frequency words like appendix or anesthesia, and hopefully, you’ll never have an urgent need to know those words while traveling."
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