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Benoit Flippen
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Office beer refresh complete. Minus the box of goodies for the downstairs bar. Paulaner Märtzen on tap, and a good mix of Belgian trippel, porter, pumpkin ale, IPA, stout, cider, Flemish sour, etc. for variety. Yes there's also Corona, Michelob and O'Dool's because we respect people with parataste as well (ok, the Corona was for cinqo de mayo and only half got drunk. The Mick Ultra and O'Dools have been there for... A couple years?).
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Cracking up over the "... a couple years?" part. I guess no one is that desperate. lol
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This is some of the worst science reporting of ever. But I find the reported results compelling and therefore endorse them.
 
"Researchers found that those who opted for drinks like coffee and tonic water were more likely to exhibit signs of Machiavellianism, sadism and narcissism."

COFFEE?

IMA CUT U.
Gin and tonic is a lot like Marmite - many of us can’t stand the bitter taste, while others swear by its refreshingly boozy properties. Now psychologists are saying that a particular liking for bitter-tasting food and drinks, like a G&T, means you could have psychopathic tendencies. Researchers found that those who opted for drinks like coffee and tonic water were more likely to exhibit signs of Machiavellianism, sadism and narcissism.
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Fantastic article. Also, the bits about reworking memories and pre-composure are especially interesting as possible aids to the overstimulated and fear-bound. And might help explain why meditation in general can help calm the mind in a more long-term role.
 
08|26|2016
Alex Honnold has his own verb. “To honnold”—usually written as “honnolding”—is to stand in some high, precarious place…By J.B. MacKinnon
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That was a great read. 
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I need these in my life stat.
 
It’s breakfast! It’s brunch! It’s a snack! It’s a glorious mess. And in case you’re wondering, the waffles are pretty amazing just on their own.
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Benoit Flippen
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➙ Photography (Shave of the Day etc.)  - 
 
Look! I made a thing!

Only a year and a half after starting this project (though much of it was annoyed down time after breaking the first set of scales I tried to make, as some may remember), I have completed my first razor restoration, such as it is.

This is my old Orchid, which used to have a deep, almost black patina to the blade, and flimsy black scales which finally cracked from age.

Now the blade is shiny, and I made new scales from "cranberry" resin, with shimmery bits in.

I would have preferred nickel pins, but the nickel collars were just a tad too small to fit on the rod-stock. So, brass it is. There are also a few, em, imperfections in the scales, where I chipped part out while drilling the pin hole, but all in all, I couldn't be more pleased with my first successful attempt.
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No, I completely mis-spoke. It's not resin. It's acrylic/polyester composite blocks (I was thinking "polyester resin" in my mind when I said it, not thinking of resin as its actual own molded product).

So, it comes in blocks, which I ripped down into quarter inch slabs with a bandsaw, and then used a coping saw (by hand :)) to cut the rough shape out, followed by precise shaping with a hand file.
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Lol! Go Brussels!
 
Tu est très cul, Bruxelles.

Brussels, the giant penis’ mystery
https://streetartnews.net/2016/09/brussels-the-giant-penis-mystery-nsfw.html
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This is awesome, as is the next video in the series where she plays two trumpets at a time, and then three. Then a trumpet and banjo at the same time.
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What. I've tried to play two brass instruments at once before and kinda made it happen. Ish, as in they both made noise by way of something close to resembling a workable embouchure on both. But this... this is mind blowing.
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Via +Chris Curtis​.
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Apparently, Michael Jackson was not mentally ill. He was a patron of the arts, trying to recreate Egon Schiele's work in the flesh. Seriously, go do an image search for Schiele. About a third of them are more extreme versions of the one below.
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There are few symbols in the drink world more powerful, more recognizable or more American than the Martini glass. An angular monument to Deco design, its characteristic V-shaped bowl and fine stem have long represented that most iconic of drinks, so much so that there is arguably no other image that better communicates the very notion of the cocktail.

There is also no glass more despised by today’s bartenders.
...
“Just as architecture moved in the direction of brutalism, so the Martini became excessively dry, flavorless vodka replaced gin, and the ritual of mixing was abandoned in favor of the Martini on the rocks,” writes Edmunds. “In both cases, the esthetic impulse of modernism was carried to a self-defeating extreme.”

What had once been, in effect, an emblem of the middle-class cocktail party was by the ‘60s being outwardly shunned as disagreeably dry, too spirituous and representative—both literally and metaphorically—of American corporate values as epitomized by the advertising culture of Madison Avenue.

“The purity, transparency, and lack of messiness of the perfect American cocktail now seemed to mirror a sterile lack of messiness in life and work,” explains Rudin, “won at the expense of emotional involvement and the realities of life.”

Following its nearly two decade-long decline, the Martini would fall out of vogue entirely by the early ‘70s. In 1973, Esquire derided it as “a bitter, medicinal-tasting beverage” that represented “everything from phony bourgeois values and social snobbery to jaded alcoholism and latent masochism.”
There are few symbols in the drink world more powerful, more recognizable or more American than the Martini glass. An angular monument to Deco design, its
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