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Qiaochu Yuan
Worked at Machine Intelligence Research Institute
Attends University of California, Berkeley
Lives in Berkeley, CA
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Very nice visualization of prime factorizations. 
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iirc, this is included in http://incrediblenumbersapp.com/, which is a nice app for kids
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Here's a dumb riddle. We all know that a meromorphic function on a Riemann surface is a function to CP^1. We also all know that meromorphic functions on a Riemann surface form a field, and in particular a ring. So... why isn't CP^1 a ring object in the category of Riemann surfaces?

(It took me an embarrassingly long time to figure this out.)
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Is it because the point is not a Riemann surface?
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Ah, technology. It's a blessing and a curse. To help get more people to read your posts is pure pleasure on my side! In that reign, I tried some categorification-without-looking-at-literature myself, to come up with an alternative to burritos. And these notes want out, if I'd only dare to post them. Maybe more programmers people would like categorification if they knew more...

There. It's promised, nothing can go wrong now. And maybe it even works and someone shows up here for better, or for more.
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Among all of the standard algebraic structures that a student typically encounters in an introduction to abstract algebra (groups, rings, fields, modules), commutative rings are somehow special: th...
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Previously we learned how to count the number of finite index subgroups of a finitely generated group $latex G$. But for various purposes we might instead want to count conjugacy classes of finite ...
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Qiaochu Yuan

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It's common to think of monads as generalized algebraic theories; the most familiar examples, such as the monads on $latex \text{Set}$ encoding groups, rings, and so forth, have this flavor. Howeve...
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Once upon a time I imagine people were very happy to think of Lie algebras as "infinitesimal groups," but presumably when infinitesimals fell out of favor this interpretation did too. In this post ...
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You can write code to "implement" a Lie algebra by writing polymorphic code for the group and replacing the base field of reals with the reals extended by infintesimals: http://blog.sigfpe.com/2008/04/infinitesimal-rotations-and-lie.html

The variable I call 'e' gives the comultiplication.
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Previously we claimed that if you want to check whether a category $latex C$ "behaves like a category of spaces," you can try checking whether it's distributive. The goal of today's post is to just...
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Let $latex 2$ be a set with two elements. The category of Boolean functions is the category whose objects are the finite powers $latex 2^k, k \in \mathbb{Z}_{\ge 0}$ of $latex 2$ and whose morphism...
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I have a dumb question about physics. Let's consider the one-dimensional heat equation du/dt = d^2 u / dx^2 with boundary conditions u(0, t) = u(L, t) = 0. An example of a solution is u = e^{-t^2/2} sin (pi x / L).

Now, if I think of this solution as being supported on the interval [0, L], then energy is clearly not conserved. But the Wikipedia article claims that the physical derivation of the heat equation assumes conservation of energy. So what gives? Are the boundary conditions somehow sucking all of the energy away? 
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+Arkadas O : thanks again! That was very helpful. 
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What's going on with Wordpress's LaTeX? I can't see anything when I try to write new posts. 
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I'm not having this problem, but my last post was on November, 16.
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Have them in circles
2,313 people
Frank Arthur's profile photo
Dan Carter's profile photo
KeunHo LEE's profile photo
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Albertas Dvirnas's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Graduate Student
Employment
  • Machine Intelligence Research Institute
    Visiting Fellow, 2013 - 2013
  • PROMYS
    Counselor, 2012 - 2012
  • Stack Overflow, Inc.
    Intern, 2011 - 2011
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Berkeley, CA
Previously
Boston, MA - New York, NY - Bellevue, WA - Nanjing, China - Singapore - Vancouver, WA - Cambridge, UK
Story
Introduction
I'm a third-year graduate student in mathematics at UC Berkeley. 
Bragging rights
USA Mathematical Olympiad Honorable Mention (2006), Siemens-Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition Semifinalist (2007), Intel Science Talent Search Finalist (2008), William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition Honorable Mention (2009), NSF Fellow (2012)
Education
  • University of California, Berkeley
    Mathematics, 2012 - present
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Mathematics, 2008 - 2012
  • University of Cambridge
    Mathematics, 2010 - 2011