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Sean Krauss
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We moved Smarty and Nellie into separate (but adjacent) cages, because Smarty started bullying Nellie. Smarty was upset with the separation, and went on a food & water strike for a day and a half: a very dangerous proposition for a little pig. So we gave them some shared floor time and this happened. Suddenly Smarty wants to stand vigil over her declining friend.
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We moved Smarty and Nellie into separate (but adjacent) cages, because Smarty started bullying Nellie. Smarty was upset with the separation, and went on a food & water strike for a day and a half: a very dangerous proposition for a little pig. So we gave them some shared floor time and this happened. Suddenly Smarty wants to stand vigil over her declining friend.
Photo

Post has attachment
We moved Smarty and Nellie into separate (but adjacent) cages, because Smarty started bullying Nellie. Smarty was upset with the separation, and went on a food & water strike for a day and a half: a very dangerous proposition for a little pig. So we gave them some shared floor time and this happened. Suddenly Smarty wants to stand vigil over her declining friend.
Photo

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Hi, fellow pig appreciators! I come to you for advice. Long post for context: I appreciate anyone who's willing to read and weigh in.

[TL;DR: How does a piggie tell you that it's time to say goodbye?]

This is Nellie, the center of my heart for the past three years. The vet approximated Nellie's age at 2 when we adopted her, so she's PROBABLY a little over 5. Nellie lost a LOT of weight between January and April, and her behavior was such that our vet felt Nellie wasn't enjoying life (the main concern was that she lay down when stroked).

The vet had issued a similar concern in January, when Nellie (at a healthy weight) had a seizure during a mani-pedi (yes, I bring her in for her nail clippings!). The vet kept her for the day for observation, and noticed that she ate normally, but would lie down, even kind of on her side. She does this at home as well, among other normal activities, and she's done it for at least a year. So, this is established as abnormal pig behavior, but maybe normal Nellie behavior.

Anyhow, in April, the vet did some reading up on piggie hyperthyroidism, but advised against a blood draw to confirm. (To be fair, the blood draw would almost certainly not confirm anything, but would, at best, show "consistency" with hyperthyroidism.) Nellie has a pronounced bulge on her neck, which has grown significantly over the past few months, also consistent with hyperthyroidism. Unrelated but slightly relevant: Nellie has had a cystic ovary ever since we've had her: it grows and shrinks in size, and if it ever bursts (most likely through human handling), Nellie will die.

Here's the quandary. In April, the vet recommended that we euthanize Nellie, right then and there. She thinks her behavior warrants that choice, though her color (lip and foot) seems normal. My wife and I had discussed this possibility ahead of time, and agreed that we weren't there with our Nell. Instead, we opted to treat the hyperthyroid with methimazole despite the lack of condition confirmation: the vet felt we had nothing to lose in doing so.

Nellie seemed to respond positively to the medicine for a couple weeks: Immediately after the vet, she seemed more lethargic than normal for a few days, then seemed to grow less bony and somewhat more energetic and interested in her environment. We have to administer the medicine twice daily, and Nellie resists it, but my wife and I have a two-person system of alternating affection and no-nonsense medicine delivery which allows us to administer a dose in about 10 minutes (believe me: this is a huge improvement from day 1!).

But now every perceived abnormality carries grave weight. If she complains when we pick her up, we worry. If she lies down when we let her rest on a towel between squirts of methimazole, we worry. If she poos smaller than normal, differently than normal, or not at all, we worry. All of those cases have happened at one time or another, but then other medicine administrations go fine, with good pig-human interaction, exploration, and normal poos.

This morning, between doses, she seemed to have a fit of tiny convulsions which, to anthropomorphize, I'd call hiccups. They subsided. Back in the cage, she eats, runs around, jumps on and off the second level of her habitat, lies down in an igloo, and talks with her cagemate (who will be CRUSHED at her loss).

So, the vet recommended we put her down. We've had some really good days with Nell, and some worrisome days with her. We feel lucky for each day we have with her, and for the first week after the vet, I consistently came home from work convinced I would find that she'd passed in the day. I've swung really hard back and forth between giving her a comfortable goodbye or letting her live out her days and finally pass in a comfortable environment.

We have lost pigs through both euthanasia and natural at-home loss. The euthanasia was a surprisingly harrowing and not-at-all peaceful transition, one we vowed to avoid when possible with future pets. However, the very LAST thing we want for Nellie is for her to spend her days in agony. We simply can't tell how she's feeling, since her behavior has never really been pig-normal.

Folks, what signs do you look for to know that it's time? It's been two and a half weeks since the vet issued her recommendation. I recognize there's no single, simple answer, but the weight of this decision is breaking my heart, and I hope that hearing other pig owners' advice and experience will lend clarity. I have no illusions that we'll be celebrating Christmases with Nell, but where there's life, there's hope, right?
Photo

Post has attachment
Hi, fellow pig appreciators! I come to you for advice. Long post for context: I appreciate anyone who's willing to read and weigh in.

[TL;DR: How does a piggie tell you that it's time to say goodbye?]

This is Nellie, the center of my heart for the past three years. The vet approximated Nellie's age at 2 when we adopted her, so she's PROBABLY a little over 5. Nellie lost a LOT of weight between January and April, and her behavior was such that our vet felt Nellie wasn't enjoying life (the main concern was that she lay down when stroked).

The vet had issued a similar concern in January, when Nellie (at a healthy weight) had a seizure during a mani-pedi (yes, I bring her in for her nail clippings!). The vet kept her for the day for observation, and noticed that she ate normally, but would lie down, even kind of on her side. She does this at home as well, among other normal activities, and she's done it for at least a year. So, this is established as abnormal pig behavior, but maybe normal Nellie behavior.

Anyhow, in April, the vet did some reading up on piggie hyperthyroidism, but advised against a blood draw to confirm. (To be fair, the blood draw would almost certainly not confirm anything, but would, at best, show "consistency" with hyperthyroidism.) Nellie has a pronounced bulge on her neck, which has grown significantly over the past few months, also consistent with hyperthyroidism. Unrelated but slightly relevant: Nellie has had a cystic ovary ever since we've had her: it grows and shrinks in size, and if it ever bursts (most likely through human handling), Nellie will die.

Here's the quandary. In April, the vet recommended that we euthanize Nellie, right then and there. She thinks her behavior warrants that choice, though her color (lip and foot) seems normal. My wife and I had discussed this possibility ahead of time, and agreed that we weren't there with our Nell. Instead, we opted to treat the hyperthyroid with methimazole despite the lack of condition confirmation: the vet felt we had nothing to lose in doing so.

Nellie seemed to respond positively to the medicine for a couple weeks: Immediately after the vet, she seemed more lethargic than normal for a few days, then seemed to grow less bony and somewhat more energetic and interested in her environment. We have to administer the medicine twice daily, and Nellie resists it, but my wife and I have a two-person system of alternating affection and no-nonsense medicine delivery which allows us to administer a dose in about 10 minutes (believe me: this is a huge improvement from day 1!).

But now every perceived abnormality carries grave weight. If she complains when we pick her up, we worry. If she lies down when we let her rest on a towel between squirts of methimazole, we worry. If she poos smaller than normal, differently than normal, or not at all, we worry. All of those cases have happened at one time or another, but then other medicine administrations go fine, with good pig-human interaction, exploration, and normal poos.

This morning, between doses, she seemed to have a fit of tiny convulsions which, to anthropomorphize, I'd call hiccups. They subsided. Back in the cage, she eats, runs around, jumps on and off the second level of her habitat, lies down in an igloo, and talks with her cagemate (who will be CRUSHED at her loss).

So, the vet recommended we put her down. We've had some really good days with Nell, and some worrisome days with her. We feel lucky for each day we have with her, and for the first week after the vet, I consistently came home from work convinced I would find that she'd passed in the day. I've swung really hard back and forth between giving her a comfortable goodbye or letting her live out her days and finally pass in a comfortable environment.

We have lost pigs through both euthanasia and natural at-home loss. The euthanasia was a surprisingly harrowing and not-at-all peaceful transition, one we vowed to avoid when possible with future pets. However, the very LAST thing we want for Nellie is for her to spend her days in agony. We simply can't tell how she's feeling, since her behavior has never really been pig-normal.

Folks, what signs do you look for to know that it's time? It's been two and a half weeks since the vet issued her recommendation. I recognize there's no single, simple answer, but the weight of this decision is breaking my heart, and I hope that hearing other pig owners' advice and experience will lend clarity. I have no illusions that we'll be celebrating Christmases with Nell, but where there's life, there's hope, right?
Photo

Post has attachment
Hi, fellow pig appreciators! I come to you for advice. Long post for context: I appreciate anyone who's willing to read and weigh in.

[TL;DR: How does a piggie tell you that it's time to say goodbye?]

This is Nellie, the center of my heart for the past three years. The vet approximated Nellie's age at 2 when we adopted her, so she's PROBABLY a little over 5. Nellie lost a LOT of weight between January and April, and her behavior was such that our vet felt Nellie wasn't enjoying life (the main concern was that she lay down when stroked).

The vet had issued a similar concern in January, when Nellie (at a healthy weight) had a seizure during a mani-pedi (yes, I bring her in for her nail clippings!). The vet kept her for the day for observation, and noticed that she ate normally, but would lie down, even kind of on her side. She does this at home as well, among other normal activities, and she's done it for at least a year. So, this is established as abnormal pig behavior, but maybe normal Nellie behavior.

Anyhow, in April, the vet did some reading up on piggie hyperthyroidism, but advised against a blood draw to confirm. (To be fair, the blood draw would almost certainly not confirm anything, but would, at best, show "consistency" with hyperthyroidism.) Nellie has a pronounced bulge on her neck, which has grown significantly over the past few months, also consistent with hyperthyroidism. Unrelated but slightly relevant: Nellie has had a cystic ovary ever since we've had her: it grows and shrinks in size, and if it ever bursts (most likely through human handling), Nellie will die.

Here's the quandary. In April, the vet recommended that we euthanize Nellie, right then and there. She thinks her behavior warrants that choice, though her color (lip and foot) seems normal. My wife and I had discussed this possibility ahead of time, and agreed that we weren't there with our Nell. Instead, we opted to treat the hyperthyroid with methimazole despite the lack of condition confirmation: the vet felt we had nothing to lose in doing so.

Nellie seemed to respond positively to the medicine for a couple weeks: Immediately after the vet, she seemed more lethargic than normal for a few days, then seemed to grow less bony and somewhat more energetic and interested in her environment. We have to administer the medicine twice daily, and Nellie resists it, but my wife and I have a two-person system of alternating affection and no-nonsense medicine delivery which allows us to administer a dose in about 10 minutes (believe me: this is a huge improvement from day 1!).

But now every perceived abnormality carries grave weight. If she complains when we pick her up, we worry. If she lies down when we let her rest on a towel between squirts of methimazole, we worry. If she poos smaller than normal, differently than normal, or not at all, we worry. All of those cases have happened at one time or another, but then other medicine administrations go fine, with good pig-human interaction, exploration, and normal poos.

This morning, between doses, she seemed to have a fit of tiny convulsions which, to anthropomorphize, I'd call hiccups. They subsided. Back in the cage, she eats, runs around, jumps on and off the second level of her habitat, lies down in an igloo, and talks with her cagemate (who will be CRUSHED at her loss).

So, the vet recommended we put her down. We've had some really good days with Nell, and some worrisome days with her. We feel lucky for each day we have with her, and for the first week after the vet, I consistently came home from work convinced I would find that she'd passed in the day. I've swung really hard back and forth between giving her a comfortable goodbye or letting her live out her days and finally pass in a comfortable environment.

We have lost pigs through both euthanasia and natural at-home loss. The euthanasia was a surprisingly harrowing and not-at-all peaceful transition, one we vowed to avoid when possible with future pets. However, the very LAST thing we want for Nellie is for her to spend her days in agony. We simply can't tell how she's feeling, since her behavior has never really been pig-normal.

Folks, what signs do you look for to know that it's time? It's been two and a half weeks since the vet issued her recommendation. I recognize there's no single, simple answer, but the weight of this decision is breaking my heart, and I hope that hearing other pig owners' advice and experience will lend clarity. I have no illusions that we'll be celebrating Christmases with Nell, but where there's life, there's hope, right?
Photo

Post has attachment
Hi, fellow pig appreciators! I come to you for advice. Long post for context: I appreciate anyone who's willing to read and weigh in.

[TL;DR: How does a piggie tell you that it's time to say goodbye?]

This is Nellie, the center of my heart for the past three years. The vet approximated Nellie's age at 2 when we adopted her, so she's PROBABLY a little over 5. Nellie lost a LOT of weight between January and April, and her behavior was such that our vet felt Nellie wasn't enjoying life (the main concern was that she lay down when stroked).

The vet had issued a similar concern in January, when Nellie (at a healthy weight) had a seizure during a mani-pedi (yes, I bring her in for her nail clippings!). The vet kept her for the day for observation, and noticed that she ate normally, but would lie down, even kind of on her side. She does this at home as well, among other normal activities, and she's done it for at least a year. So, this is established as abnormal pig behavior, but maybe normal Nellie behavior.

Anyhow, in April, the vet did some reading up on piggie hyperthyroidism, but advised against a blood draw to confirm. (To be fair, the blood draw would almost certainly not confirm anything, but would, at best, show "consistency" with hyperthyroidism.) Nellie has a pronounced bulge on her neck, which has grown significantly over the past few months, also consistent with hyperthyroidism. Unrelated but slightly relevant: Nellie has had a cystic ovary ever since we've had her: it grows and shrinks in size, and if it ever bursts (most likely through human handling), Nellie will die.

Here's the quandary. In April, the vet recommended that we euthanize Nellie, right then and there. She thinks her behavior warrants that choice, though her color (lip and foot) seems normal. My wife and I had discussed this possibility ahead of time, and agreed that we weren't there with our Nell. Instead, we opted to treat the hyperthyroid with methimazole despite the lack of condition confirmation: the vet felt we had nothing to lose in doing so.

Nellie seemed to respond positively to the medicine for a couple weeks: Immediately after the vet, she seemed more lethargic than normal for a few days, then seemed to grow less bony and somewhat more energetic and interested in her environment. We have to administer the medicine twice daily, and Nellie resists it, but my wife and I have a two-person system of alternating affection and no-nonsense medicine delivery which allows us to administer a dose in about 10 minutes (believe me: this is a huge improvement from day 1!).

But now every perceived abnormality carries grave weight. If she complains when we pick her up, we worry. If she lies down when we let her rest on a towel between squirts of methimazole, we worry. If she poos smaller than normal, differently than normal, or not at all, we worry. All of those cases have happened at one time or another, but then other medicine administrations go fine, with good pig-human interaction, exploration, and normal poos.

This morning, between doses, she seemed to have a fit of tiny convulsions which, to anthropomorphize, I'd call hiccups. They subsided. Back in the cage, she eats, runs around, jumps on and off the second level of her habitat, lies down in an igloo, and talks with her cagemate (who will be CRUSHED at her loss).

So, the vet recommended we put her down. We've had some really good days with Nell, and some worrisome days with her. We feel lucky for each day we have with her, and for the first week after the vet, I consistently came home from work convinced I would find that she'd passed in the day. I've swung really hard back and forth between giving her a comfortable goodbye or letting her live out her days and finally pass in a comfortable environment.

We have lost pigs through both euthanasia and natural at-home loss. The euthanasia was a surprisingly harrowing and not-at-all peaceful transition, one we vowed to avoid when possible with future pets. However, the very LAST thing we want for Nellie is for her to spend her days in agony. We simply can't tell how she's feeling, since her behavior has never really been pig-normal.

Folks, what signs do you look for to know that it's time? It's been two and a half weeks since the vet issued her recommendation. I recognize there's no single, simple answer, but the weight of this decision is breaking my heart, and I hope that hearing other pig owners' advice and experience will lend clarity. I have no illusions that we'll be celebrating Christmases with Nell, but where there's life, there's hope, right?
Photo

Dreamed last night that I was running a Gumshoe convention game in which 4 out of 5 players decided their characters had no hands.

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Smarty wanted to be a tribble for Halloween, and Nellie didn't have any ideas, so she went along with it. Of course, that meant I had to dress up and pose with 'em.
Photo

Post has attachment
Smarty wanted to be a tribble for Halloween, and Nellie didn't have any ideas, so she went along with it. Of course, that meant I had to dress up and pose with 'em.
Photo
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