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Wordy English
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Belles-lettres: vocabulary, writing style, literature, languages, linguistics… matters.
Belles-lettres: vocabulary, writing style, literature, languages, linguistics… matters.

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etymology of calculus

1660s, from Latin calculus “reckoning, account,” originally “pebble used as a reckoning counter,” diminutive of calx (genitive calcis) “limestone” (see chalk (n.)). Modern mathematical sense is a shortening of differential calculus.

Also used from 1732 to mean kidney stones, etc., then generally for “concretion occurring accidentally in the animal body,” such as dental plaque. Related: Calculous (adj.).

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=calculus
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《冰雪奇缘》 上海话版 Shanghainese version http://wordyenglish.com/chinese/Frozen__Let_It_Go__Shanghai_version.html
《冰雪奇缘》文言版 in Chinese 🎶 http://wordyenglish.com/chinese/disney_frozen_in_chinese.html
《Frozen》, ♪《Let it Go》 English version 🎶 http://xahmusic.org/music/Disney_Frozen__let_it_go.html
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subscribe, for barely daily dosage of the English, and writing literature linguistics, stuff.
Disorder of a Man of Letters — Xah's Belles-lettres
http://wordyenglish.com/lit/blog.html
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programer = pettifogger, mousing to'n'fro, daily.

1560s, from petty; the second element possibly from obsolete Dutch focker, from Flemish focken “to cheat,” or from cognate Middle English fugger, from Fugger the renowned family of merchants and financiers of 15c.-16c. Augsburg. In German, Flemish and Dutch, the name became a word for “monopolist, rich man, usurer.”

    A ‘petty Fugger’ would mean one who on a small scale practices the dishonourable devices for gain popularly attributed to great financiers; it seems possible that the phrase ‘petty fogger of the law,’ applied in this sense to some notorious person, may have caught the popular fancy. [OED first edition, in a rare burst of pure speculation]

However, OED also calls attention to pettifactor “legal agent who undertakes small cases” (1580s), which, though attested slightly later, might be the source of this. Related: Pettifoggery.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=pettifogger
《etymology of pettifogger》 http://wordyenglish.com/lit/blog.html
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etymology of “sultry”: 1590s, “oppressively hot, close and moist”.
The word sultry, describes this song.
http://xahmusic.org/music/borderline_sharon_apple.html #english
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