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Alex Parker
118 followers -
WYSIWYG.
WYSIWYG.

118 followers
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To follow my "Spinning Moons" post, I created a few spinning maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background: 

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Do you like GIFs? Do you like the many fancy moons in our solar system?

If so, you might enjoy this selection of spinning moon GIFs I put rendered:

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Ice Hunters! Our paper detailing the discovery and characterization of the L5 Neptune Trojan 2011 HM102 is now published in The Astronomical Journal.

If you would like a copy of the final version, let me know!

http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-3881/145/4/96/

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Which planet is the most popular? I used Google n-gram data to find out.

http://planetsabove.blogspot.com/2013/02/planetary-popularity.html

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How do you visualize a century of asteroid encounters? I illustrated them all in the "Flyby Clock." Post at the "Daily Minor Planet."

http://minorplanetcenter.net/blog/flyby-clock/

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"Accidental Geoengineering" - an infographic I put together to illustrate human Carbon Dioxide production on an astronomical scale.

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A new New Horizons Kuiper Belt Object Search discovery, 2011 JX31, submitted to the MPC. This one also assisted by citizen scientists - see the list of those that assisted in the announcement MPEC: http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/mpec/K12/K12X59.html

This object flies by New Horizons in mid-2020 at a range of about 60 million kilometers. You can see it as one of the silver points passing New Horizons in 2020 in the Kuiper Bely fly-through animation: http://vimeo.com/45883622

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The discovery paper of 2011 HM102, our new L5 Neptune Trojan, is now on the arXiv. Includes an appendix listing the contributing contributing citizen scientists from Ice Hunters / Ice Investigators.

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For all the Ice Hunters / Ice Investigators who helped, here's our first announced discovery from the 2011 / 2012 New Horizons search effort: 2011 HM102, an L5 Neptune Trojan. Its the highest inclination Neptune Trojan known, and it is brighter than any other known L5 Trojan object in the solar system (Patroclus is the brightest L5 Jupiter Trojan, and it is slightly fainter than 2011 HM102).

77 Ice Hunters / Ice Investigators helped recover 2011 HM102. Given its estimated diameter of 90-180 km, and assuming it is roughly spherical, the surface area of 2011 HM102 per Citizen Scientist is at least that of the Hawaiian island of Lānaʻi.

See the video details on Vimeo for animation details.

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An animation I've put together to represent the entire sample of over 2k Kepler planet candidates.
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