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Stephen Compall
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Playing with the higher-order implications of variance and higher kinds in #Scala.

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A common pitfall for the #Scala type member practitioner: Type#Projection.  It isn't that useful, that is.  Part 4 of the Type Parameters & Type Members series.

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What happens when I forget a #Scala refinement?  What happens when I misspell one?  Part 3 of the Type Parameters & Type Members series.

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"When are two methods alike?" Introducing <:ₘ and ≡ₘ, relations on method types.

The second in the #Scala "Type Parameters and Members" series, on typelevel.

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Start of a new series on #Scala type parameters and members. Let's start with: how are Scala's type members like type parameters?

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My #Scala type system talk, "Types out of patmat", from PNWScala 2014 in November.  Original description:

At first glance, the pattern matcher appears to be a mechanism merely for choosing among structural conditions of your data structures. However, scalac is much more powerful than that; many patterns have interesting type-level consequences on the other side of their associated rocketships (=>). This is a powerful tool for modeling in a functional style, as well as a source of interesting type-system bugs. We'll examine various type-level effects of patterns, how you can use them to write safer programs, and what pitfalls arise in scalac's current implementation.

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My talk on #Scala pattern matching's type-level effects, "Types out of patmat", was accepted for PNWScala in Portland, Nov 14–15. Hope to meet some typelevel people!
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