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Mario Falcetti
Works at technical office- mechanical industry
Attended Polytechnic University of Milan
Lives in Castiglione Olona (provincia di Varese
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Mario Falcetti

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Anna Rimovska's profile photoAroa Olavarría's profile photoTaisiya Danylchuk's profile photoPaola Briancesco's profile photo
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Nice ! Happy Sunday :))
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Mario Falcetti

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Manuela Mager's profile photoMario Falcetti's profile photoFoto Mania Italia's profile photo
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+Mario Falcetti  Ho selezionato la tua foto che condivido con piacere su +Foto Mania Italia! Vi troverai una selezione delle migliori foto dell'Italia e dei fotografi italiani. Complimenti e cordiali saluti (Miky C.)
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Mario Falcetti

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LABYRINTHS IN THE GOTHIC CATHEDRALS and THE 'CHEMIN DE JERUSALEM'
During the Middle Ages the labyrinths received particularly interest and were often realized in the Gothic Cathedrals.
The most famous of today's existing labyrinths is at Chartres Cathedral, in France. This labyrinth was meant to be walked but is reported to be infrequently used today. In the past it could be walked as a pilgrimage and/or for repentance.
As a pilgrimage it was a questing, searching journey with the hope of becoming closer to God. Sometimes this labyrinth would serve as a substitute for an actual pilgrimage to Jerusalem and as a result came to be called the "Chemin de Jerusalem" or "Road of Jerusalem".
At Chartres, at the center of the labyrinth is a rosette design which has a rich symbolic value including that of enlightenment; the four arms of the cross are readily visible.
[from: http://www.lessons4living.com/chartres_labyrinth.htm ; see also: http://www.villemagne.net/site_fr/jerusalem-labyrinthes.php]
In France, there is another interesting labyrinth in Amiens Cathedral [see: http://www.luc.edu/medieval/labyrinths/amiens.shtml ]
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Alexander Bud's profile photoAnna Rimovska's profile photo
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beautiful
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Mario Falcetti

Landscape  - 
 
Italy: Brunate (Como): from the trail to Bocchetta di Molina
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Vladimír Vocelka's profile photojayant pathak's profile photo
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👀
➖⚜➖⚜➖⚜➖⚜➖
🌳🌺🌺🌳
🇬🇴 🇴🇩
😁☕😁☕
🇲 🇴 🇷 🇳 🇮 🇳 🇬
ஜ▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬ஜ

Very beautiful photo. My best wishes
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/OVn1rlrQLprGDXtDY2hK7R0o8wXzRf8V1g5G0k8_gcKP1DAIUYNttxLTJWMrd65MkMzD3y8PrM0
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Mario Falcetti

❏ Thursday Contest - #WeeklyTheme  - 
 
Thursday Contest: BICICLETTE - BICYCLES
At Copenaghen

#weeklytheme
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Vladimír Vocelka's profile photoMario Falcetti's profile photo
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thanks +Vladimír Vocelka happy Saturday
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Mario Falcetti

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ALASKA AIRLINES FLIES FIRST COMMERCIAL FLIGHT WITH NEW BIOFUEL MADE FROM FOREST RESIDUAL
On November 14, 2016, Alaska Airlines made the world’s first commercial flight using a new sustainable alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals from the Pacific Northwest – the limbs, stumps and branches that are left over after a timber harvest or forest thinning of managed forests on private land.
The flight departed from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., powered by a 20% blend of the new, sustainable biofuel sourced directly from the Pacific Northwest.
The fuel for the flight was produced by the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA): 32 member organizations from the academia, aviation, private industry, and the government, that came together under a USDA grant to demonstrate the viability of producing alternative jet fuel from forest residuals. Gevo, Inc., a NARA partner, successfully adapted its patented technologies to convert cellulosic sugars derived from wood waste into renewable isobutanol, which was then further converted into Gevo’s Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) fuel: believed to be the world’s first alternative jet fuel produced from wood, the fuel meets international ASTM standards, allowing it to be used safely for commercial flights.
Using forest residuals for biofuel feedstock does not compete with food production; air pollution is cut by reducing slash pile burning; removal of residuals prepares the forest floor for replanting; and the new industry of woody biomass collection and conversion helps create jobs in rural economies. Also, forest residuals are abundant and can be sustainably supplied from private lands.
Sustainable alternative jet fuels reduce greenhouse gas emission by 50-80% over the lifecycle of the fuel- from growth of the feedstock, transportation to a processing facility and production. This flight will emit approximately 70% less CO2 than conventional petroleum jet. [from: https://blog.alaskaair.com/alaska-airlines/news/nara-flight/ ]
A Seattle-to-D.C. flight used an alternative fuel made with wood scraps.
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Alexander Bud's profile photoAnna Rimovska's profile photoMario Falcetti's profile photo
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happy Friday +Anna Rimovska 
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Italy: Val d'Intelvi (Pigra; Como): Grigne mountains, from Boffalora
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Vladimír Vocelka's profile photoMario Falcetti's profile photo
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thanks +Vladimír Vocelka happy weekend
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Mario Falcetti

Tuesday - Red/Orange  - 
 
Rhododendron / Azalea
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Igor Schevchenko's profile photoMario Falcetti's profile photo
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thanks +Igor Schevchenko happy Wednesday
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