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Doug Essinger-Hileman
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Doug Essinger-Hileman

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+Rob Bonewitz: I thought of you as I listened to the narration at the beginning of this video.

It is an interesting view into the process of making enameled cast iron cookware. But if I were the forklift driver towards the beginning, I would be insulted! The narrator describes the driver as having "not a care in the world."

Certainly, there are forklift drivers who drive in that manner (and you've encountered at least one!). But most drivers are skilled and careful, and from the video it seems this driver is one of them.

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I think that in this case the comment was meant to say he didn't appear nervous, or did appear to be in complete control of the situation. It's hard to know what she meant having never done the job. If she had done the job I believe her comments would not have been quite so obtuse.

Back to your point, I would be insulted too.
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Doug Essinger-Hileman

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I know there's a good chance +Rob Bonewitz will find this artwork very interesting, and there's likely others so:
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I had the same question, +Rob Bonewitz!
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Doug Essinger-Hileman
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Wild-Yeast Fermented Breads  - 
 
All home sourdough bakers can become part of a scientific inquiry:

Many bakers treat their sourdough starters like a family heirloom. Some starters date back decades, even centuries. Now researchers want to analyze your starters to unlock their flavor secrets.
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Yes! A friend brought this to my attention a couple days ago. 
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By the end of today, the four pickles intended for Thanksgiving Day will be fermenting away in the respective containers. The recipe for the garlic dills is our basic one: garlic, dill weed and seed, peppercorns, mustard and coriander seed, and a bit of hot pepper. The recipes for the other three were found in an article on TheKitchn food site:

http://www.thekitchn.com/nick-ballas-brined-pickle-platter-168780

All the produce was bought at the local farmers market. The carrots were small and (mostly) left whole. The watermelon radish was rather larger, so was cut in half before slicing. These were started midweek. The green cherry tomatoes are the last on our plants; I'll pick them today and start them later, along with the garlic dills.
I had a wonderful meal at the restaurant Bar Tartine in San Francisco a while back. One of the many highlights was the first thing on the table: a delightful array of brine-pickled vegetables served up in jars gathered on a rough wooden tray. Read on for three recipes from this repertoire and a few hints on how to create a pickle platter at home.
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+Doug Essinger-Hileman​ the problem has been mold and scum. And the vegetables turn into mushy slime. Perhaps it's the airborne yeasts or bacteria in my neck of the woods. Or maybe it was too hot. I have had success with the canning version, but natural fermentationed pickles elude me. Help!! 
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Interesting article providing insight into one of the medical problems that can occur when baking (particularly with a wood-fired oven).

Recovering from ‘baker’s lung,’ the Phoenix chef Chris Bianco recasts his business.
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+Daniel Strachan hazmat masks? 
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Following on +joe sotham's lead, another technical question:

As part of the appetizers my wife and I are making, I am baking a Westphalian Black Bread. The bread, a dense rye, is put into baking pans which are sealed with foil, then put into a cold oven turned to 350F for 40 minutes. At that point, the temp is lowered to 220F and the loaf bakes for another 24 hours.

I am presuming that during the first part of the bake, the crumb is set and baked, and during the long second part of the bake, the sugars are slowly caramelized (this is stated explicitly in the recipe).

The problem: sometime overnight, we had a very short power outage (guessing from the clocks which didn't reset, of about a minute). While most of our clocks reset, the oven did not turn back on. My best guess is that the oven was on for about 12 hours and then was off for about 3.

I have turned the oven back on to 220F -- and my intention is to leave the bread in the oven for another 12.

Can anyone shed light on whether I have chosen a good course on this or not?
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+Doug Essinger-Hileman are you sure that's not a recipe for a truncheon? Those Westphalians must be hardy folk.
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This just about sums up where I'm at right now. This is the best cover of this song I've ever heard. And while I like the original, this better captures my mood right now.

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It is the single best remake I have ever heard.
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I know this is a small joy, but still it is a joy. Today the mail brought 3 pairs of socks -- 100% cotton socks, mid-calf, very nicely made, soft and comfortable. My feet are enjoying them right now.


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Small joys are the best! 
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Has anyone had any experience with a cordless electric lawnmower?

We have a small yard (front yard is perhaps 12x12; side yard is 3x25 and back yard is perhaps 5x5), and I've read that the cordless electric mower is perfect for these small yards. And the local Home Depot has a refurbished Ryobi on offer for $150 (half price).

It seems to me to be a good deal, but . . . your thoughts?
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+Rob Bonewitz: this Ryobi system is 40V; the batteries are 5 aH. Ryobi already has over a dozen tools in this system, including several lawn mowers, a couple leaf blowers, some string trimmers, a generator and some chainsaws. As Ryobi's batteries have been reliable in the past, I think those in this system will be reliable. 
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This is the first time I have ever encountered a published article on this delicacy.

I was attracted to this article because I've eaten them -- once. In my first year of grad school, in Denver, I had saved enough money to go on a date, and I choose a restaurant in the foothills which was designed after one of the forts on the Oregon Trail.

Having grown up along the east coast, I missed fresh seafood (which wasn't easy to find in the midwest in the late 70s). When I saw oysters, I instinctively ordered them. After I had eaten two of them, the waiter said to me, in front of my date, "You know you're eating bulls' balls, right?!"

I didn't recoil in horror, nor throw up. And I would have continued eating (they had a nice flavor but a squishy texture) except my date was grossed out by the thought of me continuing to eat them.

For those who have never encountered the Rocky Mountain Oyster, here ya' go:

They're known by many names: lamb fries, bull fries, huevos de toro. There's a rich tapestry of Western lore built around this food, which is, well, fried testicles. Our reporter bites into this tale.
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Tucson has the exclusive Mountain Oyster Club extablishment. It was started a long time ago by ranchers and politicians and they still serve mountain oysters but as unbreaded appetizers. Never been there or tried them...the more vegetarian-ish I become, the less I want to try them!
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Has anyone used the Baron Fig notebooks with their fountain pens? Does the paper play nicely with your pens?
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Autumn has begun to unfold in southeastern Pennsylvania. Keemun tea has already been in the cups several mornings. And hot apple cider toddies were the nightcap last night.
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