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Anjin Anhut
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Anjin Anhut

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Hey peeps,

If you enjoy my work and find what you read helpful, please consider support my ongoing efforts by becoming a patron.

Patreon is a way to support your favorite web creators with a small donation on a regular basis. Any amount is greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Anjin
Patreon is empowering a new generation of creators. Support and engage with artists and creators as they live out their passions!
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Anjin Anhut

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Hey PBS crew...

I as an abstractionist advocate I have these debates quite often, with developers or my game design students or friends and I think the question  – asking for a binary game-yes or game-no conclusion – is unnecessarily dividing people.

I found that a useful question in conversations is "does this thing have game in it?" Games are an amalgam of different media forms – by nature they must feature a way of communication with the player, that has already been explored in other media. Be it art, writing, music, animation, sequential storytelling and so on...
... maybe an exception would be a game that completely runs on tactile feedback without any audio or visual presentation.

Games are usually a media mix.


BUT there are communicative means and properties that originated in the creation of games and these are worthy of formalist definitions. ...play activities, challenges, fail states ect. ...these elements make games. They are game native.

However there is no healthy way – i think – to define a threshold of how many of these game native means need to be in a game to have this game be worthy of its label. Because this threshold ONLY serves as a barrier against abstractionists.

So here is the deal:

Abstractionist get a barrier free medium in which they can decide how much game native elements they put in their game – so they can come up with a package that best serves their creative vision.

Formalists get to clearly define what games consists of by breaking up games into properties /means and cataloguing these game native elements. There is important value in formalistic exploration of games and what games consist of. Game DNA if you will. 

But for this we have to understand games (and other media) as a pool of communicative means to use, explore, share, expand and not a set of means that need to be complete or GTFO.

Abstractionists v formalists is a nice terminology btw. Very helpful.

Cheers.
Anjin
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Anjin Anhut

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I just started a new retro collecting obsession... ...read more.
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Anjin Anhut

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One fundamental aspect in your analysis is missing. The progress oriented nature of a game, as driven by mechanics that only change the game state significantly when progress is registered.

Structure, order, strategy or any sort of group dynamic is not required to complete games. You can beat almost any game by simply entering infinite RANDOM commands. Because game states usually do not revert to a previous state, but only advance to the next. Only progress adds up.

Do to the nature of most video games, randomness will evtl. create progress, because there is nothing that creates significant regress. As long as a game is in motion, it will meet the next progress requirement, but falling back again is mechanically impossible. No humanity necessary.
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This episode is dealing with a lot of questions from the two Teslas episode, where there is a "fictional" version of Tesla in public conscience which due to the fact that the name and other properties are non-fictional gets rounded up to a real existence.

And diving into solipsism or issues of hallucinations, brainwashing etc., there are no guarantees that anyone of us is actually able to discern fictional from non-fictional properties/entities in our experiences and memories. Not really.

It's just that a group of people agrees on putting one set of properties/entities into the fiction category or not. Like huge groups of people do with Jesus and Mohammed, where there is such a conflict of categorization, that people start wars over it.

When it boils down to it, no matter how real something is, its existence – for us – is always a concept in our minds/memories, including all the variations of this concept based on who is thinking of it. So what makes an entity categorized as fictional less than the concepts we have of entities/properties we categorize as real?

Everything EXISTS as fiction. ...even reality.
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I recently started gathering links and permissions to share the work of my students on my blog.

Check out the first batch of my student's portfolios online. Cheers.
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Anjin Anhut

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Hey Idea Channel gang...

Yes, we literally live totally in a culture of hyperbole.

But I dont think it should worry us regarding decay of language. There are always people who worry that language devolves, but that actually never happens. They worry that young people ruin language, that the internet ruins language, that twitter ruins writing, that immigrants ruin language, that ebonics is a ruination of the english language... but all devolving is in fact only ever evolving.

Language always suits the needs of the people who use it... be it trying to fit in 140 characters or be it youth-culture slang to separate yourself from how your parents talk.

And when we develop the need to express actual awe, we will develop the language means to do so.

To misquote Jeff Goldblum: Language will find a way.
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Anjin Anhut

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Hey Mike...

2 things:

Thing 1:
Your ad hominem explanation is incomplete, as it allows for the common misuse of naming that fallacy. I have to frequently deal with people in conversation who cry "ad hominem" when they get something negative said against their person, even if that negativity is a direct reaction of their argument.

If you say "this guy is not cool, so his arguments are also not cool" you do an ad hominem, right. But if one says "your arguments are really not cool, why do have to be such a not cool guy" – that's a different thing.

Personal attacks and insults are never pretty but sometimes a valid reaction of being hurt or provoked. Me being so angry at someone for what they say so that I question their character is not an indicator for my arguments being weak or based on a logical fallacy. But especially in conversations about racism and sexism – these people use "Ad Hominem" as a free pass or instant-win-card once the slightest hint of contempt for their bigoted action is displayed, even though it has no bearing on the validity of WHY we dislike them.

I think this should have been clarified, because it's a common mistake in the identification of ad hominems.

Thing 2:
In your video you advocate fro a "right way" to win an argument. I think that is a problematic way to approach any argument, since winning as a goal makes you vulnerable to confirmation bias and vulnerable to use rhetorical traps.

A debate should be a learning experience not a contest. Fighting for your views should be about the fact that you believe in them and think more people should share them, not about winning anything. Finding out your point is not as valid as you have thought should never be a fail state.

...at least not outside of professional politics.

Thanks.
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Anjin Anhut

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Okay, so a couple of months ago I was a total newbie when it comes to working with Unity. Never did anything in it… I worked with a lot of people wielding the engine, but never did it myself. And then I got together with Martin Nerurkar and he gave me a one-on-one 3.5 hour crash course.

Now I know how to build scenes, how implement objects, collisions, characters, cameras, GUIs, animation, how to draw terrain, how to script, add effects and sound… and even more. The cool thing: We did this via google hangouts,…

…and recorded everything, so you can work along with me and get a grip on how to use Unity.
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Anjin Anhut

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Also interesting to explore is the question of post-humanist ideas like digitized minds. Is a person who sheds his/her body and downloads his/her mind on a hardrive no longer existing? If you answer yes, is a copy of that hard drive data  still an existing person? If you still answer yes, is a mind on a hard drive composed by creators but with the exact same properties also an existing person, when there is no physical difference to the downloaded former body-having person?
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Anjin Anhut

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3 Things:

1.
The kind of selfie discussed in the video are , yes, visual status updates. However, there are ways in which you can make selfies as art, even if we ignore the "everything is art if you made it with the intend to make art"-thing. Especially when you create a series of selfies, complex concepts and longer stories can be told.

2. The status update quality of selfies is similar to emoticons. Emoticons always have been part of social media speech acts and the argument can be made, that the selfie is just a more versatile incarnation of emoticons, I think.

3. Suggestion: Let's call a person making selfies a selfiegrapher.

Cheers.
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Anjin Anhut

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You deserve good things. MAKE THEM HAPPEN!
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Have him in circles
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Dea Schreiberling (DerSchreiberling)'s profile photo
Tammo Suess's profile photo
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