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Steppin' Up Physical Therapy
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Recipe Wednesday - Three-Bean Chili With Chunky Tomatoes: Spice up your evening with this yummy recipe! Click here for the recipe! http://dlvr.it/Qnb3fx
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Elbow injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament don't require surgery: The number of surgeries for these injuries is increasing significantly at all levels of play The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a band of tissue that connects the inside of the upper arm bone to the inside of the forearm at the elbow. It helps to support and stabilize the arm during movements like throwing a ball, but is commonly injured in sports that require lots of overhead motions, particularly baseball. In fact, UCL injuries are often considered the most prevalent overuse injury in baseball, meaning it results from too much time throwing without enough rest. The number of UCL injuries in baseball has been steadily increasing in recent years, and along with it, so has the rate of surgeries to address them. This is true on all levels of play, as the incidence of UCL reconstruction (surgery for UCL injuries) is increasing in the major leagues and down to the level of 15-19-year-olds. However, it's important to point out that the majority of injuries to the UCL do not actually require surgery. Research has shown that 84% of professional baseball players with partial UCL tears have been able to successfully return to play after completing non-surgical treatment like physical therapy, yet many players continue to have surgery. For this reason, a review was published to explain why non-surgical treatment should be used for most UCL injuries and what can be done to ensure a safe return to baseball. Players should be carefully examined to confirm the UCL injury After a baseball player is injured, an athletic trainer, physical therapist or some other medical professional must examine him to diagnose the problem. Common symptoms of a UCL injury include swelling, tenderness, loss of throwing speed or control, and pain in the middle of the elbow that is particularly strong while throwing. UCL tears usually develop gradually over time and are noticed by a gradual decline in the ability to throw, although some players experience them suddenly during play with a "popping" sensation. If a UCL injury is suspected, an imaging test like an X-ray, MRI or ultrasound is often needed to confirm it. Non-surgical rehabilitation usually broken down into three phases Most experts recommend that non-surgical care should be used at first to treat most UCL injuries. Non-surgical rehabilitation of these injuries is usually guided by a course of physical therapy and broken down into three phases. The goals of phase 1 are to reduce pain and restore pain-free elbow and shoulder motion through a variety of strengthening exercises. Once the patient can perform certain movements with no pain and minimal tenderness, they may progress to phase 2, in which the goals are to normalize strength and to start performing sport-specific activities. In this phase, the intensity of the strengthening exercises should be increased and patients should begin preparing for throwing again with medicine ball exercises. Finally, phase 3 is the return-to-sport phase, which can begin once the patient has a satisfactory exam, usually after about six weeks. The central part of phase 3 is a return-to-sport interval-throwing program (ITP), in which players are instructed on how to throw and pitch properly in order to avoid future injuries, which may last several weeks. This should also be accompanied with the physical therapist identifying any other factors that may increase the risk for injury-such as pitching too many fastballs, pitching through pain and not taking enough time off each year-and offering advice on how to address them. If all of these components are followed, most patients with UCL injuries can expect to recover safely and return to baseball at a similar level as before the injury. Baseball players with these injuries are therefore encouraged to visit a physical therapist for an evaluation and treatment recommendations before considering surgery. -As reported in the September '17 issue of The Physician and Sportsmedicine http://dlvr.it/QnT2N1
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What are the most common injuries in field hockey? #SeeApt1st: What are the most common injuries in field hockey? How can you prevent them? #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/Qn4n0V
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Motivational Monday: -Earl Nightingdale http://dlvr.it/QmdrV1
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Physical Therapy Month - #SeeAPT1st: America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills. Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary: As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction; Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids; People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose. To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem. Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management. A safe way to manage and treat pain Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapist's individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery. Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when... The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy. Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions. Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient." APTA's #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit http://MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you. http://dlvr.it/QmFPMl
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Recipe Wednesday - Whole-Wheat Bow Tie Pasta With Puttanesca Sauce: Capers, anchovies, and olives! Oh my! Click here for this great recipe! http://dlvr.it/Qm7Rk7
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How to avoid devastating injuries with these 3 resources: How to avoid devastating injuries with these 3 resources Here is our latest monthly video. http://dlvr.it/Qm1Q6R
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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month http://dlvr.it/QlvbT0
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6 Common Cycling Injuries.: 6 Common Cycling Injuries. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/Qldfpb
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Did You Know This About Your Knee?: Did You Know This About Your Knee? Here is our latest monthly video. http://dlvr.it/QlP01Z
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