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Dr. Patrick Treacy
324 followers -
Cosmetic Doctor, Humanitarian, Physician, Author
Cosmetic Doctor, Humanitarian, Physician, Author

324 followers
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Dr. Patrick's posts

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Exposed: How schoolgirls are being preyed on by lip filler cowboys who charge them as little as £59 for a jab which can scar them for life 

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The deaths last year of three of the biggest names in music inspired producer Billy Farrell and McKeon, whose usual backing group are three-time winners of the Wedding Band of the Year award, to arrange a tribute song combining Prince’s Purple Rain, Cohen’s Hallelujah and Bowie’s Life on Mars, sung by McKeon with Sandii Hyland and the Earthangel Gospel Choir.

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The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, a National University of Ireland, is the professional association and educational institution responsible for the medical speciality of surgery throughout the island of Ireland.

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This is the story of a boy from a small Irish village who became an adventurer, a humanitarian and a doctor to the stars. Part travelogue, part thriller, part celebrity tell-all, you’ve never read anything quite like it. Patrick Treacy grew up in rural Northern Ireland during the Troubles. Determined to become a doctor, he raised the money for medical school by smuggling cars from Germany to Turkey.
Working in a hospital in Dublin in 1987, a needle he had used to draw blood from a patient with HIV jabbed him in the leg. He took blood test after blood test, wondering whether he was going to die.
Overwhelmed, he moved to New Zealand, away from everyone who knew what he was going through: his girlfriend, his friends and his colleagues. Thus he began a peripatetic existence, working as a doctor around the world. In Saddam Hussein’s Baghdad, Treacy was arrested and imprisoned, spending days wondering whether he was going to be hanged as a spy. In Australia, he worked for the Royal Flying Doctor Service. On returning to Dublin, Treacy set up the Ailesbury Clinic, where he worked on the cutting-edge of the new field of cosmetic dermatology, championing treatments including the use of Botox. This brought stars to his doorstep, including the King of Pop himself, Michael Jackson. Central to this memoir is Treacy’s personal journey: his efforts to escape the Troubles, cope with the fear that he might have contracted HIV (until he found out that he had not), get over his lost love and defend Michael Jackson’s legacy.

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Dr. Patrick Treacy is Chairman of the Irish Association of Cosmetic Doctors and Irish Regional Representative of the British Association of Cosmetic Doctors. Honorary Board Member of the World Medical Trichologist Association. Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Royal Society of Arts. (London). Honorary Ambassador to the Michael Jackson Legacy Foundation and the Haiti Leadership Foundation, which opened orphanages in both Haiti and Liberia the past year. He holds Honours Degrees in Molecular Biology and Medicine. He was the recipient of the Norman Rae Gold medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin. He has also received many national and international academic awards including the MyFaceMyBody Awards in London both in 2012 and 2013 for innovations in Aesthetic Medicine and Hair Transplant. He also won the prestigious AMEC Award in Paris both in 2014 and 2016 for research relating to cancer patients and complications due to dermal fillers. His clinic won 'Best Aesthetic Clinic in Ireland 2016' and he was runner up in 'Best Aesthetic Doctor of the Year UK & Ireland 2016'.

He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles in medical and scientific journals and published many peer-reviewed papers within these disciplines, including a sentinel study on the rising incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma for the Mayo Clinic, Rochester in 1990. He pioneered facial implant techniques for HIV related facial lipodystrophy and early radiosurgery venous thermocoagulation. He won innovation awards for the use of 633nm phototherapy in facial rejuvenation and the use of platelets in hair transplantation. He is an advanced aesthetic trainer and has trained over 800 doctors and nurses from around the world.

He is a renowned international guest speaker and features regularly on national television and radio programmes. He has featured on the Today Show, Ireland AM, CNN, Dr. Drew, RTE, TV3, Sky News, BBC and Newsweek.

Dr. Patrick Treacy is Chairman of the Irish Association of Cosmetic Doctors and Irish Regional Representative of the British Association of Cosmetic Doctors. Honorary Board Member of the World Medical Trichologist Association. Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Royal Society of Arts. (London). Honorary Ambassador to the Michael Jackson Legacy Foundation and the Haiti Leadership Foundation, which opened orphanages in both Haiti and Liberia the past year. He holds Honours Degrees in Molecular Biology and Medicine. He was the recipient of the Norman Rae Gold medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin. He has also received many national and international academic awards including the MyFaceMyBody Awards in London both in 2012 and 2013 for innovations in Aesthetic Medicine and Hair Transplant. He also won the prestigious AMEC Award in Paris both in 2014 and 2016 for research relating to cancer patients and complications due to dermal fillers. His clinic won 'Best Aesthetic Clinic in Ireland 2016' and he was runner up in 'Best Aesthetic Doctor of the Year UK & Ireland 2016'.

He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles in medical and scientific journals and published many peer-reviewed papers within these disciplines, including a sentinel study on the rising incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma for the Mayo Clinic, Rochester in 1990. He pioneered facial implant techniques for HIV related facial lipodystrophy and early radiosurgery venous thermocoagulation. He won innovation awards for the use of 633nm phototherapy in facial rejuvenation and the use of platelets in hair transplantation. He is an advanced aesthetic trainer and has trained over 800 doctors and nurses from around the world.

He is a renowned international guest speaker and features regularly on national television and radio programmes. He has featured on the Today Show, Ireland AM, CNN, Dr. Drew, RTE, TV3, Sky News, BBC and Newsweek.

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Dr. Patrick Treacy is Chairman of the Irish Association of Cosmetic Doctors and Irish Regional Representative of the British Association of Cosmetic Doctors. Honorary Board Member of the World Medical Trichologist Association. Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Royal Society of Arts. (London). Honorary Ambassador to the Michael Jackson Legacy Foundation and the Haiti Leadership Foundation, which opened orphanages in both Haiti and Liberia the past year. He holds Honours Degrees in Molecular Biology and Medicine. He was the recipient of the Norman Rae Gold medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin. He has also received many national and international academic awards including the MyFaceMyBody Awards in London both in 2012 and 2013 for innovations in Aesthetic Medicine and Hair Transplant. He also won the prestigious AMEC Award in Paris both in 2014 and 2016 for research relating to cancer patients and complications due to dermal fillers. His clinic won 'Best Aesthetic Clinic in Ireland 2016' and he was runner up in 'Best Aesthetic Doctor of the Year UK & Ireland 2016'.

He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles in medical and scientific journals and published many peer-reviewed papers within these disciplines, including a sentinel study on the rising incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma for the Mayo Clinic, Rochester in 1990. He pioneered facial implant techniques for HIV related facial lipodystrophy and early radiosurgery venous thermocoagulation. He won innovation awards for the use of 633nm phototherapy in facial rejuvenation and the use of platelets in hair transplantation. He is an advanced aesthetic trainer and has trained over 800 doctors and nurses from around the world.

He is a renowned international guest speaker and features regularly on national television and radio programmes. He has featured on the Today Show, Ireland AM, CNN, Dr. Drew, RTE, TV3, Sky News, BBC and Newsweek.

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Lecture given by Dr.Patrick Treacy to Young Social Innovators in Ireland during Oct 2016 to get them to question what they are told by adults. The background to the lecture is due to the fact Pelle Lindqvist, MD, of the Karolinska Institut in Sweden published evidence based data, which showed that women who seek out the sun were generally at lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and pulmonary diseases, than those who avoided sun exposure. They also lived on average 2.4 years longer. Of more interest was the fact that non-smokers who stayed out of the sun had a life expectancy similar to smokers who soaked up the most rays.
Ireland is a country with minimal sun yet despite this undisputed evidence many Irish people wear high SPF sunscreen on a daily basis and their children are born Vit D deficient. There is a return of rickets in Dublin hospitals for the first time since the 1940s.
The sun was loved by all for the past 40million years, most especially during most of the twentieth century and the lecturer questions whether the recent restrictions imposed for the past 4 decades by the WHO and many dermatologists are much too restrictive and requires immediate updating

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Wound healing, especially impending skin necrosis and resultant scarring is a subject of great interest to surgical and dermatological medicine. While much of the physiology of wound healing is understood, gaps still exist in our understanding of the phenomenon, especially epithelial formation to prevent dermal scarring, hence the author of this publication has attempted to modify the wound milieu by using more novel means at his disposal. To advance our knowledge of the epidemiology of wound healing and the burden of scars, future studies are needed to implement more novel methodologies such as the benefit of using PRP and 633nm light sources.
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