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Yeray Seminario
3,264 followers -
Conservation Biologist and Ornithologist, Wildlife veterinarian
Conservation Biologist and Ornithologist, Wildlife veterinarian

3,264 followers
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Yeray's posts

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‪#‎challengeonnaturephotography‬ 7 nature photos and 7 nominations in 7 days This is Day 2 of my ‪#‎challengeonnaturephotograph‬. Thanks to Bill Eden and Chris Mills for their nomination!
These are Lysimnia Tigerwing, Mechanitis lysimnia macrinus, from Panama. Thanks to Jenn Sinasac for the ID!
I nominate Johanna Holldack Holldack for the #challengeonnaturephotography, a passionate photographer that enjoys all kinds of nature photography and has some really strong portraits too! Now it's up to Johanna to post a new image each day for 7 days, tag me in the post, and nominate a new person each day by tagging them.
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‪#‎challengeonnaturephotography‬ 7 nature photos and 7 nominations in 7 days This is Day 1 of my ‪#‎challengeonnaturephotograph‬. Thanks to Bill Eden for his nomination and kind words.

My first picture was taken in Morocco, a small flock of Trumpeter Finch drinking from a small puddle near Merzouga. I take the opportunity to tell that there's a Whitehawk - Birdwatching and Conservation Birding tour next March/April and there are still 3 spaces left!

I nominate Vivek Khanzode for the #challengeonnaturephotography, an accomplished photographer that specializes on bird photography. During the short time I've spent with him, I learned a lot just watching him dealing with the challenges of photographing neotropical birds.

Now it's up to Vivek to post a new image each day for 7 days, tag me in the post, and nominate a new person each day by tagging them.
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A few days ago I posted a picture of the Chinijo Archipelago from the top of the Famara cliffs. From the very same spot I took this other picture looking to Caleta de Famara and Soo.

Mario and I had to wait for days for the weather to improve, but once the Calima and the clouds cleared up, we had some incredible afternoon light.

We also had the chance to see several Eleonora's and Barbary Falcons from that site, one of my favorite places in Lanzarote, for sure.

#CanaryIslands #Photography

yerayseminario.com
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I was asked for some neotropical raptors' pics recently, and I found this one from Belize. This is a juvenile Black-and-White Hawk-Eagle that I found in the Mountain Pine Ridge. 

I had the chance to photograph this individual a few times over a couple of weeks, but never got a great flying picture. The light was normally very hard, and the black and white plumage made thinks even harder! 

Even though this is not a great picture, you can see the details on the upperwing coverts.The color on the beak and eye are incredibly vivid, and even more so on adults. It's definitely one of my favorite raptors in the world... if not the most!

yerayseminario.com

#Raptors   #Belize  
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I will be going back to the Canary Islands in a few days, scouting some new areas for future trips focusing on the endemic species and subspecies of birds.

I'm also looking forward to taking some more pictures and learning about landscape photography. Certainly, the Canary Islands offer fantastic opportunities to those who enjoy Nature Photography.

This picture was taken from the top of the Famara Cliffs, which offer great views of the Chinijo Archipelago: La Graciosa, Montaña Clara and Alegranza.

#CanaryIslands   #landscapephotography  
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A short break at the end of the day in the Aspromonte, Italy, after counting migrants near the Strait of Messina, Italy. The temperatures are rising and we are having excellent weather and increasing numbers of birds, including a few Pallid Harriers, Common Cranes and Black Storks.

#Italy   #Landscape  
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A picture from Panama. I waited until I could see the monkey in a nice position and framed by the branches. They don't stay still for a long time, there is normally very little light and they are normally way higher than where you are, so it's difficult to get a proper picture of these charismatic animals.

#wildlife   #Panama  
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Not the most attractive species to photograph, due to its abundance and... well, physical appearance and behavior, the Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), can make for some interesting portraits. Here I got very close to the subject with the vehicle and shot handholding the 300mm f/4 and extender. Because of the low light I went up to 1250 ISO, but the noise of the Canon 7D is not noticeable.

If you want to hear the amazing sounds of the Black Vulture nestlings, that could well be a Red Dragon in the Middle Earth, go to the Cornell Website here: http://ift.tt/1EuMh5s

www.yerayseminario.com

#Birding   #CostaRica  
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Considering how difficult birding can be in the rainforest, it's quite surprising how many mammals one gets to see while hiking in the jungle. Coatis, howler monkeys, sloths, tamanduas... all can be seen relatively easily on a trip to the Neotropics. Some other mammals are a little bit more difficult to see (all the cats, for instance) and it's always a treat when one of those sits in the open for a few seconds. 

This Northern Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii) was seen in Monteverde, Costa Rica, when he approached the hummingbird feeders to get its sugar fix.

Olingos belong to the Procyonidae family, which originally evolved in North and Central America, and colonized South America as part of the Great American Interchange, when the volcanic Isthmus of Panama rose up from the sea floor and bridged the formerly separated continents.

#mammals  of #CostaRica  
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I just arrived to Spain after spending almost three months in the tropics, mainly in Panama. These three months have been intense and very productive. Even though I was looking forward to be back in Tarifa, I miss Panama already, and I'm looking forward to my next trip to Central America and explore and discover more of the wonderful biodiversity of the region. 

In the picture, one of my favorites, a Broad-billed Motmot. It was wrongly believed that the motmot shaped its tail by plucking part of the feather to leave the racket. Apparently, these barbs are weakly attached and fall off due to abrasion and routine preening.

www.yerayseminario.com

#Birding   #Panama  
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