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Scott Simko
Attended Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Lives in Virginia
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Ok I decided to give Android a try so I gifted myself a Nexus 7 (wi-fi only version) for Christmas.  I've been an Apple guy for the past 6 years or so but I wanted to give Android a try I liked the idea of being able to customize the device. So I figured an Android tablet is probably the best place to start, if I don't like it I still have my iPhone.

My initial impression is the device is very responsive, quick and has a very nice display. The Google Play store is very nice and there are a ton of apps, so far SwiftKey has been the biggest standout.

However, this is a mobile devices and is meant to be taken on the road, did I mention I travel a lot. I spend about 14 days in hotels each month, sometimes more in multiple time zones. Much to my surprise the clock doesn't update to local time, remember those old flip phones? Even those clocks updated. Another glaring problem is the device looses connection with hotel servers (the ones that require you to go to a sign in page and input a pass code or purchase the service). I get it the hotels kick you after a short downtime and require you to log back on which should be no big deal but the browser won't go back to the sign in page. I read on a forum that you can use the Dolphin browser in desktop mode to get the sign in page but it doesn't work for me.

My question is how can two basic features not work on a somewhat mature operating system? Part of the reason I switch to Apple awhile back was someone told me "it just works" and I agree. I'm starting to wonder if the same hold true in this case. If there are any Android gurus out there that can help please chime in. 
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+Scott Simko not meant to be snarky. Ios suits some people better
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It may not be the reason for the Cardinal loss but it can explain the lack of offense. #cheatingischeating 
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Scott Simko

General Discussion  - 
 
I'm headed to Portland, OR in a couple days and will be staying downtown.  I need craft brewery recommendations that I can walk to from downtown, a couple miles is no big deal.  Any recommendations are welcome.
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Sounds like you're starting things off right. 
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Scott Simko

Discussion  - 
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Scott Simko

Brewporn  - 
 
3 1/2 weeks and the hops are doing well
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Cool idea with the buckets!
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I was writing a blog post about three recent changes to Google's UX that made me feel that Google has changed how they think about design, specifically toward simplifying the UX for current users at the expense of the new user learning curve, when I decided maybe I was being arrogant, seeing as how I didn't do the user research Google did, so instead I'm going to talk about them here in hopes that in this Google-rich population I might learn rather than preach.

First up is the 'new tab' chicklet in the Chrome tab bar. Somewhere around Chrome 16 the '+' disappeared from it, leaving a little ghost of a button that, to my mind, wouldn't be recognized for what it was by a user who hadn't already formed their mental model on earlier versions of Chrome.

IE 8 and 9 do it this way, with a small ghosted (but full-connected) tab, while Firefox explicitly retains the '+'. Do users who are coming from a less-than-modern browser understand that the chicklet is a baby tab waiting to be given form?

Second is the Gmail conversation view. Gmail isn't my baby anymore, and I don't pipe up about design decisions that are different than how I would have designed it, because Gmail's design team's goal isn't to do what I would do. However, the new conversation view is unfortunate. One of the main goals of the 'card stack' design was to give a visual metaphor of a 'new-stuff-first' list, even when it's actually in chronological order. The 'stacking' of read cards tested extremely well and people understood not only where one reply stopped and the next began, but how to expand cards to re-read earlier parts of the conversation.

The new design flattens conversations completely, turning them into just a list of boxes, some of which are grey (which means closed) and some of which are white. The reply box at the end is no longer tightly coupled to the actual email you're replying to, which is a problem if the most recent reply was to a subset of the original recipients.

For the experienced user this doesn't represent much of a problem. Their mental model of conversations and collapsion was formed in the more explicit UI, and they understand the underlying meaning even when the cues are removed. My guess is that the user who never sees anything but the new UI gets a very different picture. All the problems we had when testing a flat 'expand contract' UI should crop back up if the new UI is tested on folks who have never used Gmail before.

I understand the design goal of a cleaner, sparser UI where any gradient or visual complexity should be cut but I can't help but feel that, as with the Chrome 'new tab' chicklet, a little bit of baby got thrown out with the bathwater.

Lastly, the new Gmail and Google+ 'clicking on the logo does nothing' behavior seems just absurd. Nothing this significant could have actually gotten pushed out without a huge internal conversation about it, with one side saying it's stupid and the other side thinking about how they just didn't understand the bigger picture and would get used to it.

Speaking as a practitioner who's been on both sides of that field and been right and wrong on both, this design decision is definitely one of those ones where the best of design intentions is flat out wrong. As long as there is a property logo on your page, clicking on that logo should take you to the top level of that property, and if you're already on the top level and it's a dynamic site, clicking on it again should perform the same action as clicking a refresh button on the same page.

This isn't a Google convention that will be acclimated to if changed. It's an Internet convention that predates Google's existence by a good many years. It's like if Audi started shipping all 2012 vehicles with gearshifts on the driver's left, no matter which side of the road folks drive on in your country, because it creates a more consistant experience across Audi cars or supports a future Audi strategy.

Chrome's new-tab button losing the plus? Doesn't feel right to me, but data could easily prove me wrong.

Gmail's new flat conversation view? I'm pretty sure it's not as friendly for new users struggling with threaded conversations for the first time, but maybe I'm an old fogey.

Clicks on logos no longer taking you to the top page of that site and/or refreshing content? That's just batshit crazy.

And don't even get me started on the eldritch logic that dictates that clicking on the 'News' link from a search result page doesn't carry over the search term, while clicking on 'Images', 'Maps', or 'YouTube' does.

(Update: So much for trying to make the post lower-key by writing it here instead of my blog)
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Scott Simko

Nexus (HOLOYOLO)  - 
 
Ok I decided to give Android a try so I gifted myself a Nexus 7 (wi-fi only version) for Christmas.  I've been an Apple guy for the past 6 years or so but I wanted to give Android a try, I liked the idea of being able to customize the device. So I figured an Android tablet is probably the best place to start, if I don't like it I still have my iPhone.

My initial impression is the device is very responsive, quick and has a very nice display. The Google Play store is very nice and there are a ton of apps, so far SwiftKey has been the biggest standout.

However, this is a mobile devices and is meant to be taken on the road, did I mention I travel a lot. I spend about 14 days in hotels each month, sometimes more in multiple time zones. Much to my surprise the clock doesn't update to local time, remember those old flip phones? Even those clocks updated. Another glaring problem is the device looses connection with hotel servers (the ones that require you to go to a sign in page and input a pass code or purchase the service). I get it the hotels kick you after a short downtime and require you to log back on which should be no big deal but the browser won't go back to the sign in page. I read on a forum that you can use the Dolphin browser in desktop mode to get the sign in page but it doesn't work for me.

My question is how can two basic features not work on a somewhat mature operating system? Part of the reason I switch to Apple awhile back was someone told me "it just works" and I agree. I'm starting to wonder if the same hold true in this case. If there are any Android gurus out there that can help please chime in. 
3
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I have the clock problem on both my N7(2012) and N10. Seems like they never show the correct time when connected to WiFi. I have yet to see a proper fix. 
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Scott Simko

General Discussion  - 
 
I received my "Official Taste Tester" box from Adroit Theory Brewing Company company today. The beer is great, I really enjoyed the  Cannibalism (a milk stout made with no water) and I'm intrigued by their club membership idea (similar to a wine club). I'd be remiss if I didn't mention that my hat is off to their marketing department. http://adroit-theory.com/
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Doesn't +Michelle C love these guys? 
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English: Hipmunk's mascot (Photo credit: Wikipedia) George Orwell said journalism is “printing what someone else does not want printed: everything else is public relations.” Bully for you, Eric Arthu...
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One of the things I like about where we live is at night we have very little ambient light to interfere with looking at the stars. I was saying to my wife about an hour ago while we were on the deck "I wish someone made an app where you could hold your phone up and it would tell you what you are looking at". Guess what? It's been made, how cool is that. Now if they can make one that tells me the winning lottery numbers.
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I want this! It may be my motivation to finally get a smart phone
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The Happiness Advantage
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That was awesome. Worth every second.
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People
Have him in circles
2,468 people
Lily Martinez's profile photo
John Haldson's profile photo
Floris Fokkinga's profile photo
Brent Ozar's profile photo
golang john's profile photo
Rip Ryness's profile photo
frost maan's profile photo
Julius Schorzman's profile photo
Andreas Lundgren's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Pilot, as well as a few other things
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Virginia
Previously
Fulton NY - Daytona Beach FL - Columbus GA - St. Louis MO - Fresno CA - Alexandria VA - Hagerstown MD - Naperville IL - Cross Junction VA
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Father, Pilot, Homebrewer, Tech Enthusiast, Learning Python in my spare time
Education
  • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
    Aeronautical Science, 1988 - 1992
Basic Information
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Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Closes early before published time
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Terrible service, no enough employees, screwed up order, food pager didn't work and expensive need I say more. Save your money and avoid this place it represents the franchise poorly. If you do go the onion rings are good.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
2 reviews
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