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Spider ID
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Provide friendly, helpful, online spider identification services free to the public.
Provide friendly, helpful, online spider identification services free to the public.

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Google Plus does not have a huge following, and we neglected posting this announcement here on launch day. Three weeks ago, we launched a new and rebranded spider experience at Spider ID (no longer Spiders.us). Enjoy the new community, and please let us know if you have any questions, comments or suggestions to improve the experience.
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The "Goldenrod Crab Spider" is an ambush hunter, lying patiently in wait on flowers for an insect to come within striking range. Adult females may be overall yellow or white, with the ability to change back and forth. This species can conquer surprisingly large prey like bees and butterflies.
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The “Arrowshaped Micrathena” is a unique little orbweaver found in the eastern U.S. west to Nebraska and Texas. The shape and coloration of the female make it easily identifiable. The orb web of this species is usually built in low bushes in open deciduous woodlands and along forest edges.
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This species of Hacklemesh Weaver is native to Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil but has been introduced to North America via commerce and trade. It is now well-established in the southeastern USA, as well as southern California. Being closely associated with humans, it may occasionally stray indoors.
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The "Gray Wall Jumper" is native to the Old World tropics, but has ridden cargo to many other tropical and subtropical places around the globe. Look for these jumping spiders almost exclusively on the exterior walls of buildings here in the U.S. They are active hunters during the day and spend the night hidden away in crevices.
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Female "Southern Black Widow" spiders are black with a red hourglass on the belly, easily visible as the spider hangs upside down in its web at night. By day, they hide. Immature females have pale stripes and spots, gradually losing those markings as they age. These are shy spiders, and if you avoid placing your hands where you can’t see, bites are unlikely.
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The “Texas Recluse Spider” is a relative of the famed Brown Recluse, but is found only in the southern third of Texas and adjacent Mexico. This spider normally lives under stones, in abandoned rodent burrows, and other natural refuges. The eye arrangement is an important diagnostic feature for this genus.
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The “Brown Widow” is probably native to Africa, but now found almost globally in subtropical regions. Its affinity for man-made structures has allowed it to spread via commerce. It can be common in yards and gardens, often in more exposed situations than other widow species. The spiky egg sacs are fairly diagnostic.
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The "Southern House Spider" is often associated with human habitations, spreading its web from cracks and crevices on the exterior of homes, barns, and other structures. Males are frequently mistaken for recluse spiders (genus Loxosceles).
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This ornately-marked spider immobilizes its prey by spitting a mixture of silk, glue, and venom onto it. Watch for this slow-moving species leisurely walking the walls and ceilings at night. They are easily recognized by their dome-shaped carapace and thin, banded legs.
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