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Typography & letterpress from slowprint.com
 
Current work at +Slow Print Letterpress Studio 
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FYI!
 
Copyright Infringement By Legal123.com

If you're and artist or photographer, this is information that you should be very clear on.  As an artist, I'm very protective of my work and go to great lengths on my website to state that my work is copyright protected.  

Check out the article and video on the Legal123 website link below.  It's spot on! - Jill Saur

http://legal123.com.au/how-to-guide/copyright-infringement-myths-vs-facts-infographic/

Here’s a transcript of the Copyright Infringement video …
There are a lot of Copyright myths, misinformation and misunderstandings out there at the moment – particularly when it comes to Copyright Infringement on the Internet. So to help website owners, we designed this simple Infographic to explain what you need to know about Copyright, how not to breach Copyright and how to protect yourself from any Copyright Infringement.

Copyright belongs to the person who created a ‘work’. A ‘work’ can be a photograph, image, words, song, tagline, music, article, software code or anything you create yourself, from scratch. Any such material, or ‘work’, has automatic protection for the creator without the need for registration.

First Myth: Once a ‘work’ is posted online it loses Copyright protection. The fact is, Copyright exists in the ‘work’ from the moment it is created and does not lose its protection, even if it’s not registered, no matter where it is posted or how it is used. You cannot use or post anyone else’s photographs, images, words, songs, taglines, music, articles etc. without their express permission.

Second Myth: You can copy someone’s ‘work’ online, provided you link back to them. This is not correct. Even if you credit them, this is not, in many cases, enough or acceptable – you need to check with the owner of the ‘work’ first. There is no implied permission, so you cannot assume they are OK with it. Now some websites DO state that you can use certain material, provided you link back to them and give them credit. But you should check first, unless permission is specifically granted for the ‘work’ or item you want to repost or use.

Third Myth: If you alter or change the ‘work’ or only use a part or portion of it, you are not breaching Copyright. This is false, at least in most cases. All use, whether in part or in a derivative form is still covered by Copyright law and protections. There are, however, a few exceptions which are called “fair use”. These include use for educational purposes, critiques and other limited uses. But generally all use, whether in part or in a derivative form is breaching Copyright if you haven’t received permission.

Fourth Myth: If there is no Copyright symbol the ‘work’ is free to be used. Again, this is incorrect. There is no requirement to display a Copyright symbol or even to register any ‘work’ to have Copyright protection. It’s protected from the moment it is created and the owner does not lose this protection just because they haven’t displayed the Copyright symbol. Although there is no requirement to register Copyright, if it is an important ‘work’ or being used worldwide, you may wish to consider registration for added protection.

Fifth Myth: You can use another person’s ‘work’ so long as you don’t make any financial gain or profit from it. This is definitely wrong and false. You are breaching Copyright whether you make money or not! You cannot use the argument that you are giving the Copyright owner free advertising or that you came up with the ‘lucrative’ idea and you will share it with the Copyright owner – any and all profits you make would be taken into account by a court if you were sued. And irrespective of whether you make any money, you are still breaching Copyright. The defining issue is not financial gain but the actual breach. Find your own images and content to use and ideas to make money from.

In summary, do not use anyone else’s idea, work, images or anything that is not your own without getting permission – unless you can point to specific authorisation to use someone else’s ‘work’. Otherwise, you may find yourself with a Copyright Infringement Notice from the owner, or worse – in court.

We’re always here to help you at Legal123. And we’ve designed an easy to use Copyright Infringement Notice if you find someone has infringed your Copyright. Check us out at Legal123.com.au.

 

We hope you found this Infographic on Copyright Infringement and protection in Australia helpful. Here at Legal123 we have written an easy-to-use Copyright Infringement Notice, including options to request compensation, offer licensing and what to do if you don’t receive a response.

http://legal123.com.au/how-to-guide/copyright-infringement-myths-vs-facts-infographic/

Thanks to +Dustin W. Stout for sharing this info graphic on his page.  I've been teaching these same principles to my students for years, but it was nice to be directed to such a great source!
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If you love letterpress or typography or books or paper or all of these, you should own this book!
Highly recommended!

There are many glowing reviews of this gorgeous, marvelous book already. It is surely destined to be a foundational work for both teachers and practitioners in the ongoing history of fine printing, fine typography, experimental printing, book arts, and artist's books. 
The authors are deeply committed to both form and function of type, to concept and execution of the printed piece. This is no fluff piece pulled off by a wanna-be design writer on vacation in the Virgin Islands. This book will leave you with printer's ink on your forehead.

I've known Cathie Ruggie Saunders and +Martha Chiplis  for nearly 25 years give or take, since I first set up a Letterpress Typography Lab at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the mid 1980s.
I was asked by the Dean at the time to look into acquiring letterpress equipment. I'd been printing in my small shop in Evanston since 1980.
Kate Wolff (later Wolff-Weingart) had recently been appointed as Chair of the Visual Communication Department at SAIC, and drawing on her studies in Basel with Wolfgang Weingart, had urged the school to invest in real type for the design students. Of course, at that time, it was a very hard pull, since the Macintosh was newly planted on the Design curriculum (in fact I also set up the first Mac design lab at SAIC!). Still, we persevered, and after a visit to the school by Weingart himself, I was given a budget and asked to assemble a letterpress design lab to complement the new Mac lab.

Cathy Ruggie Saunders had been a close friend of my (late) sister Kate Friedman when they worked together at the Evanston Art Center. 
When Kate Wolff asked me about an instructor for the Letterpress Printing course, I recommended that she talk to Cathy.
Martha Chiplis was one of her students within the first years of the original Letterpress Lab. (Of course SAIC had had a Printings Arts department until the 1960s, but with the rise of Art-ism, all such practical materials were banished to the Siberia of trade schools and all the type and presses dispersed)

That mid-80s lab was lost, given away to other institutions, and then found again, as department heads changed numerous times, and the Art-ist cabals in the Faculty Senate drew their long knives. Cathy and I proposed about a Book Arts program as early as 1990, but it was thrown out, along with all the equipment, and with me, during a periodic upheaval in the SAIC political scene. It would be almost 20 years until the vibrant rebirth of letterpress, which we foresaw, would finally bring this "Type Shop" to fruition. Thank goodness that SAIC had the good sense to bring Cathy and Martha back!

This story doesn't make it into Cathy and Martha's book, but I'm honored to have my little "flywheel" business card design featured on page 13 ;-)

Again — If you love letterpress, you should own this book!
Please do like their Facebook page, and perhaps mention this post ;-)

+Peter Fraterdeus +Slow Print Letterpress Studio 
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letterpress typography

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Excellent! Thanks +Jeni Ong !
 
How Does This Tree Survive?

Richard Feynman's beautiful explanation:  http://goo.gl/fm1M8u

source:  +reddit 
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/My clouds, sorrowing in the dark, forget that they themselves have hidden the Sun/

/Let my love, like sunlight, surround you, yet give you illumined freedom/

Work in progress. I've got an exhibit coming up in June/July of my Atmospheres photos. I started thinking about doing some calligraphic paintings to complement the photos. Here are early stages of the first stand alone piece of this nature. 
It combines sumi-e with brush writing, ruling pen scripts, and turkey quill. Sumi and gold ink.
It's not complete yet. Still visualizing. 

Words from Tagore's Fireflies 

#tagore   #calligraphy  
///
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Thanks!
 
I always love to watch a Linotype in action, oldie but a goodie #letterpress #fireflypress #typetuesday  
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Here's the InDesign layout for my new calling card...
The information architecture is semi-classical, the hierarchy of importance delineated by style and placement of the elements.
Widely spaced small sans-serif capitals contrast with and form a platform for the open, crisp elegance of the Didot titling. Contact info defines the top-right corner of the frame, dynamically balancing the weight of the title and captions at the left.

The type has been adapted for letterpress: the Didot headline has a 0.1pt stroke added to keep the hairline serifs from curling in the photopolymer plate. I'll also increase the exposure on the plate a bit.

Margins, both left & right, are optical, rather than mechanical. That is, each individual line has been deliberately shifted right or left to produce a visually even vertical. All too often margins are left uncorrected, with unfortunate results. (note that here the margins appear slightly off, due to aliasing in the screen type)

The sans serif is my Quanta™ family, including Black-Caption and Bold-Caption, with additional 'finesse' in the points.
That is: the commas, dots, slash, plus,@, parentheses and periods are all set about two points larger than the surrounding copy. The dot over the 'i' in semiotx is also enlarged (it's a stand-alone period, dragged over the i). On press, the points will often drop out. There are specific optical issues with caption sizes, as well. Quanta has caption specific characteristics, but at these sizes, in letterpress, we want to exaggerate the points even further...

Golden rectangle, 85 x 52.5mm (3.35 x 2.07inch)

#typography   #finesse   #letterpress  

+IdeasWords (Ideas, Words, Idea Swords)
fraterdeus.com — letterpress master classes, etc
semiotx.com — communication strategy & typography
alphabets.com — fonts, sort of...
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We would love to have your input here! Please send me a private note, and I will add you to our "Friends of Letterpress" Circle!
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Written and curated by Peter Fraterdeus, founder and master printer at http://slowprint.com
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