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Mind Design Club
We focus on alternative health, reiki, energy work, and carry amazing products to detox.
We focus on alternative health, reiki, energy work, and carry amazing products to detox.
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Just in decorative throw pillows (BUY IT NOW!): http://www.minddesign.club/product/pillows/
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9/30/16
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Herb Of The Day: ALOE. If the old stories are true, one of Cleopatra's beauty secret was aloe. The ancient Egyptians recognized the healing properties of this herb and also used it as one of the ingredients in embalming fluid. The plant was introduced into Europe in the tenth century, where over time it became an important ingredient in many herbal medicines. Aloe arrived in the West Indies in the 16th century and is still widely grown there. The fleshy herb is today a component of modern cosmetics and health care products ranging from hand and face creams to shampoo. In cool climates, aloe is often grown in conservatories or as a houseplant. Potted aloe plants are a common sight in many kitchen, where the leaves are within easy reach to apply to minor burns. Freshly snipped aloe leaves are the ultimate homegrown first aid. 

Usage: They have a soothing effect on minor cuts and burns, dry or chapped skin, sunburn, and insect bites.
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Herb Of The Day: ALFALFA. Or Lucerne as it is often called in European countries, is a member of the pea family and crop for animals. The name alfalfa derives from the Arabic name for the plant, al-fac-facah, which the Spanish changed to "alfalfa." Most people associate alfalfa with animal fodder, but the leaves have been eaten raw or cooked as vegetable for centuries in many cultures. They are rich in protein, calcium and other minerals, vitamins A, those of the B group, C, D, E, and K. In thee United States, alfalfa sprouts have become a popular food in salads. As a medicinal plant, alfalfa is less well known. Preparation of dried alfalfa are incorporated into herbal supplements that are said to act on the circulatory and urinary system to control bleeding, reduce water retention, and lower cholesterol and glucose levels in the bloodstream. Alfalfa may also influence hormones.

Usage: For women menstruating, drinking Alfalfa tea may help with water retention and hormonal inbalances.
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