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George Pitre
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My daughter turns 12 next month and is very into tabletop gaming, so I picked up a pile of fate dice, Fate of the Flying Temple, Save Game, and the Fate Core book for her for her birthday. Should be interesting.

Being back in the Bayoulands was fun even if short lived, but now back to prepping for the next semester
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RPG Musings:
While considering things for my own game I find myself thinking about the four actions of Fate Core. Do Overcome, Create an Advantage, Attack, and Defend best represent the options available to the characters? Are the ideas of Attack of Defend really necessary in all games? When you are defending, aren't you overcoming an attack? If you are attacking, aren't you often looking to overcome a threat or establish an advantage? I love the all encompassing nature of the design, and from a game mechanic stand point I understand what each of the four are supposed to be. What I find myself sticking on is the names of the actions themselves. I don't claim to have a fix in my mind for nomenclature used, nor do I think that if I did have a "fix" that it would not create the same complaint in another reader.

Bringing these musing back to the nascent "game" rumbling in my mind, it's easy to see that the four actions already don't mesh well the ideas rolling around. Individual actions do not feel appropriate for rolls that represent multiple events in a series. The alternative to definitive "actions" in my mind is a pallet of "results" that players can choose to use their dice and rolls to achieve. The severity of the results can be based on the escalating and deescalating stakes from round to round, but the broad categories of "results" would be a constant thing.
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RPG Musings: I am currently trying to decide between a discrete list of skills, a list of tags (like city of mist or the old MET larp rules), or something like Aspects where you define the tags yourself. Each has a specific benefit in my mind.

Discrete Skills allow the focus of the game to be very clear in the writing. If I have a skill called Murder (like the early drafts of Blades in the Dark) it says something very specific about my game that simply having a weapon skill does not. My problem with skill lists is that they create a certain sense of sameness that I do not always find appealing.

Tags from a list can do something very similar to the skill list while also providing opportunity to make your character feel distinct. If you have a tag that says you are dangerous, that feels different than having a skill rating in some combat skill. The drawback to this to me is that many players I have known have bumped up against these sorts of systems like a wall after years of playing games like D&D.

Allowing the players to define their own traits like Aspects or 13th ages backgrounds allows a little more ownership but can also dilute the focus of the game. It also has historically for my groups had similar problems with player integration, but even more so. A blank page is often the most intimidating thing it seems.

I know mostly where I am going in my design ideas, but thinking about this has led me to be curious as to what other's preferences might be.
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Skill list
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Player created traits
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Today's RPG musings:

So far I have outlined a system with color coded dice pools that can be spent or rolled. Conflicts of all sorts are made over the course of three rolls, with certain outcomes (such as killing) having unique costs and setup. This brings me to that setup and those stakes.

Each conflict begins with establish a level of threat or stakes. This lets you know the type of effects that can be brought against your character. Between rounds of rolls it is possible to change the level of the stakes (so the players have the option to escalate or deescalate any conflict). Lastly if the stakes are ever pushed up to the point a player finds unacceptable for their character they can buy their way out in a way similar to conceding in Fate. My current thought is that the cost would be based on the new Stakes level.

This system would mean that for a character to be killed the stakes must be escalated to the point that unlocks death as an end result, the opponent must accept these stakes, and the roll needs to be good enough to actually get that result.
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RPG musings of the day. As physical objects, dice can be both a random number generator and a resource to be spent. To further build on this idea and the number of dice pool poll I posted the other day, I've been thinking about a system where the bigger your dice pool becomes the smarter choice may be not to roll some of them.

In this idea dice represent a choice. They can be rolled for a chance of success or spent for a guaranteed result. The trade off that makes the choice meaningful is that it always costs multiple dice, while a rolled die may generate more than enough success (or none at all).
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Thinking about the cost of violence and how to represent it in my game. I want to discourage the stereotype of the "murder-hobo", while still allowing violence to be a possible solution. My current idea is to tie a cost into the reputation based social system, which actually touches all of the other systems to begin with. If a player chooses to partake in the actions there will always be ramifications to their dicepools.
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What is the maximum number of d6 to roll at one time?
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There is a limit?
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So in my continued RPG musings I have started to hammer out a system where players roll pools of color coded dice. The dice color is based on what contributed to the success of the action (natural talent, skill, or reputation) and informs what the character's can do with their success and failures.

What I am currently trying to do is find the right balance between strategy and role playing, and support that through the three act rolls I mentioned before.
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RPG musing of the day: Thinking about a system where conflict only lasts three rounds of rolling. Each round clearly represents the beginning, middle, and end of that conflict.
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