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Apollo13 Project
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Improving Prisoner Re-entry through Policy, Research, and Dialogue
Improving Prisoner Re-entry through Policy, Research, and Dialogue

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Interesting street art by Sam3.
Source: streetartutopia
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Most Creative & Beloved Street Art Photos - Source: streetartutopia.com (12 photos)
96 Photos - View album
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Emotional intelligence and recidivism

While discussion of feelings may remind you of warm and fuzzy sing-alongs by the campfire, the issue of emotional intelligence is not to be trivialized

Interesting thoughts from a corrections perspective.
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We face a massive prison crisis in the United States, and some thinking outside the box is necessary. Earlier in American history, incarceration was rare or non-existent. Shouldn't we figure out what they were doing right?

Dostoevsky believed the degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons. Prisons today resemble declining civilizations in that prisoners spend an inordinate amount of time planning, avoiding and participating in violence directed against each other and very little time working productively. Our prisons in many respects might signal national decline. The era of American ascendancy from about 1650 to 1800 saw zero mass incarceration and very little incarceration at all as the ultimate punishment for crime. Back then, communities were more vigilant. Punishments included more judicial corporal punishment, banishment, hard labor, indentured servitude, death and public shaming. We humans like to flatter ourselves that society progresses, but that’s not always the case. In terms of effectiveness, misery, expense and social costs, few can seriously contend our modern system of punishment is demonstrably superior to the methods used earlier in American history. Today, the United States incarcerates over five (5) times as many prisoners as it did in 1975, when the “nothing works” to rehabilitate consensus appeared. Some things actually do “work,” but with this many prisoners and an economic slow-down, governments cannot afford them. We own a major crisis.


http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/318645
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Tinkering with definitions of 'recidivism' is one way to lower recidivism rates?!

The Progressive Conservatives said Wednesday the NDP has quietly changed its definition of recidivism to artificially lower the rate at which Manitoba criminals reoffend.
But Attorney General Andrew Swan said the wording was changed to more closely reflect how Ottawa measures the reoffence rate._
"It's really intended to answer the question people ask: 'What percentage of people are going to get in trouble again,' " Swan said. "The youth numbers are still high. The adult numbers, they look rational, in a word."
The difference hinges on two words: "charged" and "convicted." Under the old system, offenders who were charged with a criminal offence two years after release from a provincial jail counted toward the recidivism rate. Under the new system, the rate is calculated by how many offenders are convicted of a crime two years after release.
Tory justice critic Kelvin Goertzen said that means the recidivism rate will be considerably lower than in the past as it can take months if not years for a criminal case to get to court and see a conviction.
"It's magically reduced our reoffence rate by 30 per cent overnight," he said.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/province-tinkers-with-definition-of-recidivism-138108618.html
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