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Robert J. Pape Jr
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In Service to Others
In Service to Others

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Depression Is Not the End
Take the first step

By Robert J. Pape, Jr

Recently there has been quite a bit of news coverage on the medical condition known as depression, largely as the result of the suicide of an in-law of a so called “prominent” American family. To hear it from members of this family, the deceased in-law was a victim of depression and there was nothing that could be done to help her. Nothing could be further from the truth!

Depression is a treatable medical condition which comes about in children and adults as the result of a chemical imbalance in the brain. Many people suffer from this condition and unfortunately, many who do suffer fail to seek treatment. You see, there is still a stigma attached to this disease which stops people from seeking help. This stigma is largely the result of the lack of understanding of the disease by the general public and the perceived weakness of a person (especially a man) who seeks help for a mental health disease. As one who suffers from depression, I can honestly say it took me many years before I asked for help because of these same reasons. The important thing to remember is that help is available for this disease just like any other medical disease.

The Civil Rights Act Fifty Years Later
Published on July 24, 2014
Robert J. Pape, Jr.

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

So were the immortal words of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as he envisioned the dream of our nation. Dr. King’s words stirred passion and fear but also thought and vision. As we reflect on the civil rights movement since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, let us be encouraged by the positive strides our nation has made to end discrimination of all types among our citizens. These positive accomplishments bring our nation closer to the dream Dr. King spoke of. However, let us honestly realize that each of us still has much to do so that collectively, one day our nation will achieve the dream.

Each of us must strive to see the good in others and respect the contributions, of whatever nature or degree, each person can make to better our society. We need to respect the opinion of others and honestly and openly debate our personal differences, without demeaning the debate by invoking discrimination. We need not be afraid of someone because they are different. These objectives could not be stated without realizing the difficulty each of us face in trying to accomplish them in our personal lives. Dr. King never said achieving the dream would be easy.

At the base of human existence is the desire and need to help others and band together at time of tragedy. We have witnessed kindness and strength many times recently and throughout our history as we, as a nation, have endured tragedy through the products of Mother Nature’s fury, or the violence of forces wanting to destroy our nation, or the lone individual who commits a senseless violent act against the innocent. Each time we act with empathy and dignity, we move closer to achieving the dream. We are all capable of acting this way despite the absence of a tragic event. We can build on these actions and strive to accomplish more on an individual basis for our own good and the good of our nation. For as Dr. King also said, “We may have come over on different ships, but we are all in the same boat now.”

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VETERAN'S DAY 2015
Published on November 10, 2015
Robert J. Pape, Jr.
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Non Profit Development Professional
Tomorrow our nation takes time to honor all the men and women who answered the call to duty to serve our great nation in the defense of liberty and freedom. This service sent these brave men and women to far off shores and countries, all in the name of defending our freedoms and the way of life found only in the promise of America. This call to service is still answered today by the gallant men and women serving our nation in harm’s way in a very hostile and ever changing world.
Despite the horrendous circumstances our Veterans faced, not to mention the life threatening danger endured daily, our Veterans served our nation with pride and honor, something which this most grateful nation can never fully appreciate. Many of our Veterans still carry the scares of battle. They deserve our service and support without reservation. So tomorrow let's not forget the enduring struggle our Veterans faced in their loyal service to our nation.
Never pass up the opportunity to thank a Veteran, any day of the year, but especially tomorrow. May God continue to watch over and Bless our Veterans, and may God Bless America. Thank you

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VETERAN'S DAY 2015
Published on November 10, 2015
Robert J. Pape, Jr.

Tomorrow our nation takes time to honor all the men and women who answered the call to duty to serve our great nation in the defense of liberty and freedom. This service sent these brave men and women to far off shores and countries, all in the name of defending our freedoms and the way of life found only in the promise of America. This call to service is still answered today by the gallant men and women serving our nation in harm’s way in a very hostile and ever changing world.
Despite the horrendous circumstances our Veterans faced, not to mention the life threatening danger endured daily, our Veterans served our nation with pride and honor, something which this most grateful nation can never fully appreciate. Many of our Veterans still carry the scares of battle. They deserve our service and support without reservation. So tomorrow let's not forget the enduring struggle our Veterans faced in their loyal service to our nation.
Never pass up the opportunity to thank a Veteran, any day of the year, but especially tomorrow. May God continue to watch over and Bless our Veterans, and may God Bless America. Thank you

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VETERAN'S DAY 2015
Published on November 10, 2015
Robert J. Pape, Jr.

Tomorrow our nation takes time to honor all the men and women who answered the call to duty to serve our great nation in the defense of liberty and freedom. This service sent these brave men and women to far off shores and countries, all in the name of defending our freedoms and the way of life found only in the promise of America. This call to service is still answered today by the gallant men and women serving our nation in harm’s way in a very hostile and ever changing world.
Despite the horrendous circumstances our Veterans faced, not to mention the life threatening danger endured daily, our Veterans served our nation with pride and honor, something which this most grateful nation can never fully appreciate. Many of our Veterans still carry the scares of battle. They deserve our service and support without reservation. So tomorrow let's not forget the enduring struggle our Veterans faced in their loyal service to our nation.
Never pass up the opportunity to thank a Veteran, any day of the year, but especially tomorrow. May God continue to watch over and Bless our Veterans, and may God Bless America. Thank you

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That Tuesday
Published on September 10, 2015

Reflections on 9/11, fourteen years after the day America was changed forever.
By Robert J. Pape, Jr.

We all remember where we were 14 years ago on that Tuesday, when life as we had known it was changed forever. Images of that Tuesday will forever be in our mind, tucked away in a place where we will always find time to visit and remember each Sept. 11, for the rest of our lives, and on those occasions when we are quietly alone with our thoughts and personal reflections of life.
On that Tuesday we saw the worst and the best humanity had to offer. On that Tuesday the best of humanity triumphed over the evil spewed by the worst of humanity. Stories of heroism, valor, compassion and flat out bravery were visible, numerous and inspiring. The common man, woman and child, and airline passenger became beacons for hope, resolve and unrelenting spirit in the face of horrible danger. New York City’s and Port Authority’s Bravest, Finest, EMS, Strongest and Boldest lived up to and beyond these monikers, making them more than mere words of description.
On that Tuesday and the days and weeks that followed, we pulled together as one nation in grief and in strength, bonded together by committed resolve to defeat our enemy, remember the sacrifice of the lost and in their eternal memory, rebuild that which was so violently taken away from us. In our strength and resolve as one nation, we became a force to be reckoned with. Our steadfast leadership defended our Nation against our enemy.
On that Tuesday our flag, battered, torn and dirty remained raised and the sight of it lifted our spirits although our hearts were heavy. After that Tuesday we recognized what was really important to us and how very precious and fleeting those things truly are.
In the years that have passed since that Tuesday, we still remember that day, but perhaps we chose to keep it more tucked away in our memories since the earlier anniversaries of that Tuesday. This is only natural since we owe it to those lost to move on with our lives and our way of life. Life to most of us has returned to a normal routine. May that Tuesday always remind us of those things that are truly important in our lives and how precious they are.
The spirit that bound us as one nation after that Tuesday has over the years following, become mired in politics and economics, which is a consequence of our democratic society. On the fourteenth anniversary of that Tuesday, we should remember that spirit that bound us as one nation to meet the challenges ahead, and perhaps use that same spirit to meet the challenges that face our nation today. Together as one nation, we have and will continue to accomplish great things for all of our citizens.
On the fourteenth anniversary of that Tuesday, take time to reflect on what we have been through these last fourteen years and what we have accomplished from the horror of that day. America’s best days are ahead of it. Our nation’s resolve, although not always as evident as it was immediately after that Tuesday, remains at the ready to meet all challenges to our way of life and to make life better for all of our citizens.
We owe it to the victims of that Tuesday to never forget them. Our nation will always remember.
God Bless America.

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Director of Major Gifts for the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, an agency of the Vatican located in New York City.
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