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Anuj Ahooja
115,964 followers -
Inspired by things that don't exist yet.
Inspired by things that don't exist yet.

115,964 followers
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It's pride week and this year it feels more important than ever to stand up for those persecuted for something as simple loving someone. Luckily this is also a year where Americans can make a decision to keep moving in the right direction. As a straight non-American it's incredibly tough for me to make an impact but I'd like you to think hard about the current political situation before making your decision.

It is beyond infuriating to think that there is a major party in the first world who would rather regulate marriage among adults rather than regulate who owns a tool of destruction. A party that will regulate which bathroom one can go to but not regulate a financial industry that destroyed the economy. A group of people who are willing to take away one's rights for being the person they want to be rather than give the right of healthcare to millions who don’t have access to it. A team of people who will tell you that there are studies against LGBT parents but will ignore studies of climate change and disallow studies for gun control.

This year please do what it takes to vote for love and progress. You may not be happy with the candidate and you may not agree on everything, but it's far better than the alternative.

#pride #loveislove
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You’d expect me to say this but Google’s transformation into Alphabet is a brilliant move that enables +Larry Page, +Sergey Brin and their company to escape the bonds of their past — They’re just a search company. Why are they working on self-driving cars and magical contact lenses and high-flying balloons? — and go where no one has thought they would go before.

To Wall Street and countless bleating analysts — not to mention its competitors and plenty of government regulators — Google was a search company, though long ago it became so much more. I don’t just mean that it also made a great browser, the best maps, killer email, an open phone operating system and some of the best phones, and a new operating system (and the damned fine computer I’m writing on right now) — and that it acquired the biggest video company and the best traffic data company. I don’t just mean that Google has for a long time really been the powerhouse advertising company.

No, Google long ago became a personal services company, the post-mass-market company that treats every user as a customer it knows individually. That is the heart of Google. When they say they “focus on the user and all else will follow,” they mean it.

But Google was also a technology company, working on projects that didn’t fit with that mission.

So this move lets Page and Brin move up to the strategic stratosphere where they are most comfortable. It lets them recognize the tremendous job +Sundar Pichai has been doing running the company that is now “just” Google. It lets them invest in new experiments and new lines of business — cars, medical technology, automated homes, and energy so far, and then WTF they can imagine and whatever problems they yearn to solve. It lets them tell Wall Street not to freak at a blip in the ad market — though, of course, the vast majority of the parent company’s revenue will still come from Google’s advertising business.

A journalist asked me a few minutes ago whether there was any risk to the change. I couldn’t think of any then. I suppose one risk is that this will only freak out especially European media and regulatory technopanickers, who will now go on a rampage warning that — SEE! — Google does want to rule the world. But what the hell. They were going to do that anyway.

A few weeks ago at Google I/O, I had the privilege of meeting Page. To introduce myself, I said that I wrote a book called What Would Google Do?. “Oh, I remember,” he said with impish grin and then he asked: “What would Google do? I want to know.”

See, I don’t think even Larry Page knows what Google — er, Alphabet — will do. He is now setting himself up for discoveries, surprises, exploration, experimentation, and a magnificently uncertain future. Who wants a certain future? That’d be so damned boring. So horribly conventional.

Disclosure: I own Google — er, Alphabet — stock. And I now lust after Alphabet swag.
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This is going to be amazing.

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Macklemore & Ryan Lewis at Amazon's 20th Birthday Party.
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Get rich or use the 30-day return window to your advantage.

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Those humble beginnings.

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Seattle attempted to clean off this wall twice, only to find it filled with people's saliva-packed gum both times. Now it's a gunky selfie-attracting tourist spot with a minty smell. Funny how some things stick around.
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Gasworks looks stunning from Lake Union.
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Had some delicious Beecher's spicy mac & cheese yesterday at Pike Place. Need to go back to have some more!
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Glad to see Wal-Mart is celebrating Amazon's anniversary as well.
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