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Marisa Boraas-Connors
Works at Colorado State University
Attends Colorado State University
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Marisa Boraas-Connors

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Yes! I want to go back :)
 
Legoland is Full of Secrets—If You Know Where to Look
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Marisa Boraas-Connors

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Have fun Curiosity!
 
"Fire at will."

Autonomous laser-beaming...on Mars!:
After nearly four years on the Red Planet, the Curiosity rover has received an upgrade from NASA allowing it to use its ChemCam laser without human intervention
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Got to hit me
Hit me
Hit me with those laser beams!

Marisa Boraas-Connors

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Human impacts on river ecosystems are not a new phenomenon.
 
Salmon largely disappeared from the Netherlands due to the construction of water mills, ecologists from Radboud University conclude (Scientific Reports, 20 July). The construction of water mills caused the destruction of the gravel beds in streams, making them unsuitable for salmon to spawn. Whereas it was previously thought that water contamination was the most likely explanation, archival research demonstrates that salmon stocks had already dwi...
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Fun chemistry!
 
Burning Iron in Liquid Oxygen

Dropping a piece of burning iron wool into liquid oxygen produces a violent chemical reaction. Almost all of the iron is consumed in the exothermic reaction with oxygen to produce a mixture of iron oxides. The small pieces of iron particulates glow brightly as the reaction proceeds.

The reaction is a little contradictory since liquid oxygen is extremely cold (-186°C) and the burning metal is extremely hot. One would expect the metal to cool upon coming into contact with the liquid yet in reality it actually heats up as the reaction begins.

Source: https://youtu.be/6NNt0Pup6jU

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Iron #Oxygen #LiquidOxygen #Liquid #Burning #Chemistry #Physics #Periodic
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And I thought analyzing bitumen was a geologists game!
 
"Scientists have used mass spectrometry to analyze bitumen samples from an ancient Greek amphora found on the Taman peninsula. Judging by the level of oxygen in the sample, they managed to accurately identify it's age: 2,500 years. Authors of the study believe that using this method in archaeology will lead to even more interesting discoveries. For instance, we may obtain valuable information about the goods traffic and trade routes in the ancient world".
Scientists have used mass spectrometry to analyze bitumen samples from an ancient Greek amphora found on the Taman peninsula. Judging by the level of oxygen in the sample, they managed to accurately identify it's age: 2,500 years. Authors of the study believe that using this method in archaeology will lead to even more interesting discoveries. For instance, we may obtain valuable information about the goods traffic and trade routes in the ancient...
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Interesting implications for possible life outside this planet.
 
New Life Found That Lives Off Electricity
Scientists have figured out how microbes can suck energy from rocks. Such life-forms might be more widespread than anyone anticipated.
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Marisa Boraas-Connors

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Oooh! I've always wondered why this hasn't been created yet.
 
International team of scientists launches fossil database | #Geology #GeologyPage #FossilDatabase

Have you ever wondered exactly when a certain group of plants or animals first evolved? This week a groundbreaking new resource for scientists will go live, and it is designed to help answer just those kinds of questions. The Fossil Calibration Database, a free, open-access resource that stores carefully vetted fossil data, is the result of years of work from a worldwide team led by Dr. Daniel Ksepka, Curator of Science at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, ......

Read more : http://www.geologypage.com/2015/02/international-team-of-scientists.html
Fossil calibrations for select groups: Here is a look at the way the new fossil calibration database will help to tell evolutionary time. Credit: The Bruce Museum, Greenwich, CT Have you ever wondered exactly when a certain g...
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Marisa Boraas-Connors

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I really enjoy reading about Chris Hadfield.
 
And here's something just pleasing: +Chris Hadfield talking about various bits of daily life in space, from sleeping and going to the bathroom to the games one plays. There are still wonderful things in this world. (And out of it)

Via +Paul Hosking.
Chris Hadfield recently talked to Cracked about a few of the things he learned during two space shuttle missions and five months aboard the International Space Station.
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I'm already getting excited for this mission. I'm really curious about the oxygen from CO2 experiment!
 
This is a nifty infographic about five new things the 2020 Mars rover ("Hindsight") will do. Or, rather, four new things: the infographic claims that Hindsight will carry the first microphone sent to Mars, but that's not true. The (ill-fated) Mars Polar Lander mission carried a microphone, designed and built by +The Planetary Society​​ -- they've been trying to send a microphone to Mars for years now. (Indeed, since MPL launched in 1999, they've been trying to send one for decades.)

But the other four things are still cool. :-)

(Edit: And, as my friend +Keri Bean​ reminds me, there was also a microphone on Phoenix. But other than the microphone sent on Mars Polar Lander and the microphone sent on Phoenix, the one sent on Hindsight will totally be the first one. :-)
NASA's Mars 2020 rover mission relies on past proven technologies and advances new ones.
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Geology for the win!
 
The ground below our feet is an important component of earth’s complex system. The subsurface is teeming with life, it is home to large aquifers that provide drinking water, and it contains valuable mineral deposits that fuel economies. It may also present new opportunities to mitigate climate change. The subsurface is often overlooked, but it’s a focus of much research at PNNL. Learn more in PNNL Director Steven Ashby’s monthly column at http://goo.gl/Ydu97y.
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Ha! I can see that

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Ooh nifty! Cobalt disulfide to the rescue!
 
"Scientists discovered a pyrite-type compound, similar to fool’s gold, that is competitive with platinum for splitting water to produce hydrogen".
Scientists discovered a pyrite-type compound, similar to fool’s gold, that is competitive with platinum for splitting water to produce hydrogen.
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Appropriate for day 4/5 at a conference. :)
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Collections Marisa is following
Education
  • Colorado State University
    Geology Masters, 2014 - present
  • Colorado Mesa University
    Geology/Chemistry, 2010 - 2014
  • Colorado State University
    Anthropology, 1999 - 2001
Story
Tagline
Geology Nerd.
Introduction
I am into everything science, which I why I chose to study Geology. I get to utilize physics, biology and chemistry  in one great package...oh, and still get outside.

Outside of school I love cooking, gardening, Legos, confusing my cats, and all things geeky.

Bragging rights
I can run two mass spectrometers at once. Like a boss.
Work
Occupation
A full-time student, a part-time GTA and part time researcher.
Skills
So many.
Employment
  • Colorado State University
    GTA, 2014 - present
  • Colorado Mesa University
    Tutor/TA, 2011 - 2014
  • Colorado Mesa Univeristy-Geology Department
    Research Assistant, 2012 - 2014
  • Rocky Mountain Bagel Works
    Manager, 2005 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Futurama