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Ordnance Survey Ireland
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This Crazy-Detailed London Map Took 10 Years to Draw. The map is unapologetically inaccurate, representing less geography than the memories, moods, and impressions Fuller had as he roamed London.

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And all because the lady loves... Milk Tray!

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Trash-mapping expedition sheds light on 'Great Pacific Garbage Patch'.

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Have you seen the first known map of Ireland from 140AD? Historians believe it is likely that that the Tralee-born monk and navigator St. Brendan (circa 484 - 577) would have known of, and possibly used, Ptolemy's maps and navigational aids.

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7 Gorgeous Sea Maps from the Age of Exploration. Gerard van Keulen's De Nieuwe Groot Lichtende Zee Fakkel is arguably the most extensive collection of its era. Pictured here is the Northern Atlantic Ocean, with Iceland, Greenland, Ireland, and the northern coast of Labrador visible.

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How a deliberate cartographic mistake became a town. This an dother fascinating insights from the author of "The Fault in Our Stars" - John Green.

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An Imaginary City, 50 Years in the Mapping. According to Gretzinger’s fastidious census records, about 17 million imaginary people live in the area encompassed by the map. But the population isn’t growing as quickly as it used to, partly because of the “voids” gradually covering more and more of the colorful expanse as Gretzinger obeys his cards.

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New mapping agreement to benefit United Kingdom and Ireland location data users
A new three party agreement between Ordnance Survey (GB), Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSi) and Land and Property Services (LPS) Northern Ireland is set to improve access and availability of mapping services for customers and government users operating across the UK and Ireland.
The agreement will enable each of the national mapping organisations, for the first time, to act as a single point of access for customers choosing to view digital mapping from any of the three organisations via their web service platforms.
On 28 May senior figures from the three organisations met in Belfast to officially sign the TriOS agreement. The agreement was signed by Mick Cory (Director of Mapping LPS), Colin Bray (CEO, Ordnance Survey Ireland) and Neil Ackroyd (Acting CEO, Ordnance Survey).
The new agreement is expected to benefit business and government users of location data. From large utility and commercial companies to key government departments and media organisations operating across the United Kingdom and Ireland.
Neil Ackroyd, Acting CEO Ordnance Survey, said: “This new agreement will significantly benefit customers who use, and rely on, mapping data from any of the three regions. Web services provided by the organisations can now be developed to act as a one-stop shop, delivering efficiencies and effective working for both business and government users.”
Mick Cory, Director of Mapping LPS said: “Businesses and government increasingly operate across borders. This is a solution that meets an emerging demand for Ordnance Survey information across these islands. It has the potential to meet future uses and demands, including open data and new services.
Colin Bray, CEO, Ordnance Survey Ireland said: “I welcome this exciting new development with our fellow national mapping agencies. OSi has successfully worked with many organisations in the past and this new service will allow customers from all locations to reap the benefits of OSi’s MapGenie Web service and new data model, PRIME2, from a single access point. We look forward to working on this collaborative project.”
It is expected that the new service will be opened from late 2015.
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UW-Madison spinoff is big-time producer of specialty maps. "We are seeing a rejuvenation of certain types of printed maps, especially specialized maps," says Knipfer. "Consumers are starting to learn that you can't rely on GPS to always be alive, active.

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Maps pinpoint where cars pollute the most. Conor Gately, a PhD candidate in Boston University’s Graduate School of Arts & Sciences hopes that DARTE’s precision and ease of use will help cities locate CO2 “hotspots,” like certain roads or intersections, and target those hotspots through new policies, like altering traffic patterns, designing new streets, or targeting mass transit expansions.
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