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Antonio Moore
Works at V1s1on One
Attended University of California, Los Angeles
Lived in Los Angeles
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Antonio Moore

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http://thegrio.com/2015/03/01/incarcerated-black-america-past-present-and-future/ Incarcerated black America: Past, present and future by Antonio Moore MSNBC #TheGrio
For forty years, the United States has hidden the consequence of its dark racial history at the center of the War on Drugs. That historical consequence has now hardened into a box of mass incarceration that has trapped black America. This proverbial box is so full it is now bursting at the seams, and seeping out are the screams of men like Eric Garner and countless others that simply cannot breathe under its pressure. A past riddled with repetitive efforts to create a class-based system divided by color has been recast through a lens of criminalization. The lasting effects of longstanding racially biased policies hidden away in boxes of steel, locked behind prison bars across this nation, are the lives that prove this point.
The faces in large part are black, but just as important are the legacies behind these lives. These prisoners of this war are marked not just because of their dark skin color but also because held within their American familial lineage is a cycle of bondage that has come in several different forms. From an era of inhumane chattel slavery that lasted into the early 20th century to an extensive period that followed during which many African-American men existed in a slave-like status as prison labor during a period of convict leasing, the use of criminality to reform bondage in a more acceptable frame was finally perfected through the War on Drugs.
Opinion - For forty years the United States has hidden the consequence of its dark racial history at the center of the War on Drugs...
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The Black Male Incarceration Problem Is Real and It's Catastrophic by Antonio Moore #huffingtonpost   To give a lens for viewing this data India is a country of 1.2 Billion people, the country in total only has around 380,000 prisoners. In fact, there are more African American men incarcerated in the U.S. than the total prison populations in India, Argentina, Canada, Lebanon, Japan, Germany, Finland, Israel and England combined.

Yet the real issue is the number of people in prison should never be similar to the number educated. For most in our country this in fact holds true, but for black men the two numbers are in fact close and that is the inescapable problem. The supposed myth on its face may in fact be incorrect. There may be more black men in college than in prison, but the truth still stands that there are a socially catastrophic number of black men behind bars in the United States. Let me give a bit of context for this discussion. Referencing the same article above
"The Census estimates that approximately 18,508,926 people in the U.S. population are black males, of all ages...The Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Prisoner Statistics Program reports that in that same year, 526,000 were in state or federal prisons, and, as of mid-year 2013, 219,660 were in local jails, making for a total of about 745,000 behind bars"
There may be more black men in college than in prison, but the truth still stands that there are a socially catastrophic number of black men behind bars in the United States....
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Antonio Moore

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonio-moore/donald-sterling-racist-nba_b_5220104.html -- Sterling's comments seem to show a thought process that epitomizes the great American contradiction. A man who on one hand has made millions through broadcasting the talents of black basketball players may not want his personal associates to publicly broadcast off-court social exchanges with those same Negroes. Yet, these words are the result not just of a man bent by racism, but also a country that post Jim Crow has done too little to resolve its historical ills. The mark of a nation that has hidden its issues behind basketballs, million-dollar contracts for few and a post-racial identity that the road of progress has not achieved. We live in a place where a man who makes his millions on the backs of black Americans like Chris Paul, Blake Griffin and others can at the same time hold a belief system that looks down upon them. But to understand the value they have added to his coffers you have to understand a bit of NBA history. Sterling bought the Clippers in 1981 for 12.5 million dollars, the team's value now sits north of a half billion dollars. A league that made it's bones the last 30 years projecting the physical talents of blacks to televisions across America, now sits at an impasse forced to handle a racial public relations nightmare.
Donald Sterling's alleged words about African Americans are poignant to a culture of denial. These comments seem to show a thought process that epitomizes the great American contradiction....
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Antonio Moore

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http://www.billboard.com/biz/articles/news/branding/5847896/skee-los-i-wish-scores-espn-ad-alongside-kevin-hart-inside-hip
Antonio Moore.esq, Skee-Lo’s entertainment attorney, chalks up “I Wish”’s cultural resurgence to its “impact across a lot of race and cultural lines. It’s a happy version of hip hop,” he says. “Especially coming from the West Coast -- to have a guy admitting all his faults in the middle of the gangster rap trend really created a phenomenon. Unlike a lot of other hip-hop artists, he wasn’t saying ‘What I have,’ this is ‘What I don’t have. I’ma try to move forward and make the best of it.’”
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonio-moore/the-box-of-mass-incarcera_b_6164542.html John Legend Speaks to the Crack in the System Caused by Mass #Incarceration by Antonio Moore #huffingtonpost  
In his recent Oscar acceptance speech John Legend gave light to the impact of mass incarceration on America by stating "We live in the most incarcerated country in the world. There are more black men under correctional control today than were under slavery in 1850." By saying this while accepting an Oscar award for the film Selma, he connected mass incarceration to the Civil Rights movement in a single statement, finally allowing the issue of U.S. imprisonment to be seen for its true tragedy.
Through art Legend's words brought politics front and center to the Oscar stage in a way that has been missing from the American dialogue since the days of Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier and other activist. To give more context to the gravity of the problem he spoke to, I recently wrote the piece "The Black Male Incarceration Problem Is Real and It's Catastrophic" and stated "there are more African American men incarcerated in the U.S. than the total prison populations in India, Argentina, Canada, Lebanon, Japan, Germany, Finland, Israel and England combined." These 9 countries in total represent over 1.5 billion people, in contrast there are a mere 18.5 million black males in the United States.
Crack in the System's goal is simply to dig deeper, supply more facts, and provide the definitive story. We accomplished this by interviewing several individuals never seen on camera before speaking about the realities of their involvement with the r...
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My HuffPost piece went Viral this morning Bossip.com covered it on the cover of their site http://bossip.com/1013194/for-discussion-does-focus-on-black-celebrity-skew-our-real-financial-standing/
Does the focus on celebrity dull the impact of poverty? The Decadent Veil: Black America's Wealth Illusion Writer Antonio Moore has some thoughts on America's focus on wealthy Black celebrity, and ...
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Can Black Boys Cry? Tears Of Trayvon Martin And Jordan Davis: The Shadow Of Mass Incarceration
America as a nation has become a tale of two cities: one for young black men and one essentially for everyone else. While we can argue with this blanket statement, what cannot be refuted is that young black men are one of the most imprisoned groups i...
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonio-moore/slavery-displayed-on-screen_b_4138926.html
Slavery Displayed on Screen: a Discussion With the Creators of Roots about #12YearsaSlave & #Django Unchained
In light of the new Renaissance in African American film and television Wolper states he and his company are continuing their legacy, and developing African American stories around a few of the key social justice moments that deeply affected all of America.
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Antonio Moore

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http://allhiphop.com/2013/10/14/drakism-drake-and-our-emotional-breakdown/
Drakism: and our Emotional Breakdown by Antonio Moore.Esq
An artist simply known as "Drake" has stormed onto the rap scene with a message on the topic line of love that had been traditionally left out of popular hip hop culture. It isn't the typical (ultr...
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonio-moore/paula-deen-trayvon-martin_b_3507217.html
#PaulaDeen , #TrayvonMartin   Shadow of Racism and the Power of "the N-word" by Antonio Moore.Esq
Paula Deen, Trayvon Martin, the Shadow of Racism and the Power of "the N-word" - The Huffington Post
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Los Angeles Attorney, UCLA Alumni - Loyola Law Alumni
Introduction
Antonio Moore graduated from UCLA in 2002, and Loyola Law School in 2006. He is a former Los Angeles County Prosecutor. He is now a practicing Los Angeles based entertainment attorney with several celebrity clients. He is also an active member of the Urban League Young Professionals.     
Education
  • University of California, Los Angeles
    1997 - 2002
  • Loyola Law School
    2003 - 2006
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Gender
Male