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Wendall Coenraad
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Longer statuses. Let your inner narcissist go wild.
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Many of Earth’s natural wonders are distinctive enough to recognize from space, even when passing by at 5 miles a second. For instance, the quirky “face” of the Manicouagen crater really stands out. This impact crater in what is now Quebec, Canada is thought to be the result of an asteroid three miles in diameter smashing into the Earth about 215 million years ago. On the other hand, it’s easy to miss the Kara-Kul impact crater while traveling over adjacent mountain ranges in central Asia. Sometime between 5 and 25 million years ago, a meteorite left this 28-mile wide depression at 12,000 feet above sea level in the Pamir Mountains. +Philip Plait gave a TED Talk on how “An Asteroid Impact Can Ruin Your Whole Day” – entertaining and informative!
TEDxBOULDER - Phil Plait - An Asteroid Impact Can Ruin Your Whole Day. And Your Species
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Impact Craters on Earth Seen From Space (2 photos)
2 Photos - View album
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Interesting.
EU officially agrees that nobody reads terms of service agreements.

The European Commission is planning to stop Facebook's practice of harvesting your political opinions, sexuality, religious beliefs, location and so on and sharing that data with advertisers without explicit user permission.

The new rules will apply to other sites as well, but Facebook is currently serving as the poster-boy for abusive personal data-harvesting.

Here's what's interesting: The sign-up terms of service agreement authorize Facebook to do this, but nobody reads these things. Facebook's is 4,000 words long: http://www.facebook.com/terms.php

What the EU is saying, essentially, is that getting users to agree to a long-winded user contract does not let companies off the hook for informing users.

In other words, it's now assumed that nobody reads terms of service agreements (which is true).

What does this mean for the whole industry of software EULAs and online terms of service user agreements?
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The Soyuz spacecraft with Sergei, Mike + Satoshi undocked 26 minutes ago. This is what it looked like outside our windows and what it presently looks like out their windows as they take their last few laps around our planet before returning home
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An intense solar flare observation by yours truly on October 22, 2011. Especially watch the dark "blobs" falling downward into the flare from above. These are not dense blobs of cool matter - they're actually voids in plasma! Planet-sized bubbles of low density, moving through the 15 million-degree plasma. This warms the cockles of my heart.

Credit: NASA SDO
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The Soyuz TMA-22 rocket is seen on the launch pad during a snow storm the morning of the launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Monday, Nov. 14, 2011.
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How can a world without air have an ionosphere? Somehow the Moon has done it. Lunar researchers have been struggling with this mystery for years, and they may have finally found a solution.
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It's a beautiful day in Hue, Vietnam. The weather is wonderfully rainy and misty ... Oh how I love crappy weather. :)
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Historic Image of Inflation Test of 135 Ft Satellite In Weeksville, NC

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration 100-foot-diameter satellite, designed by the Space Vehicle Group of the NASA Langley Research Center and constructed by General Mills of Minneapolis, Minnesota, was shown during ground inflation tests in 1959. Suspended from the ceiling of a hangar the sphere, named "Echo." was inflated by use of a blower connected to the satellite by a hose. Forty thousand pounds of air was required to inflate the sphere on the ground, while in orbit it only required several pounds of gas to keep it inflated. Echo was a passive communications satellite which reflected radio and radar signals as a limited communications relay. It was also used, over a period of time and with accurate tracking, to plot the variations in air density at the top of the atmosphere by following the vagaries of its orbit. With a weight of 150 pounds, the satellite was inflated in space. It did not have a rigid skin and accordingly was used at high altitudes where it would be subjected to negligible aerodynamic drag force. To keep the sphere inflated in spite of meteorite punctures and skin permeability, a make-up gas system using evaporating liquid or crystals of a subliming solid were incorporated inside the satellite.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasacommons/5277461725/in/photostream
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