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Rachel Moore
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Congrats to Elena Scarpa, my old colleague from the Mayor lab at UCL, who I have just realised won the Beddington medal at the 2016 BSDB meeting! Here's an interview with her first published on The Node.

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When every cell in your body has about 6 feet of DNA, the DNA has to be tightly folded to fit into the cell. But, what 3D shape is it folded into? What keeps it folded in the right shape - if indeed there is a 'right' shape at all? If so, could 'misfolded' DNA be linked to certain diseases? Job Dekker and Carl Zimmer seem to ask more of these questions than they answer, but it's an interesting chat.

If you want to read further, here's a review (open access) by Job Dekker and Edith Heard that is related to this field: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.08.044/full
This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?

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When every cell in your body has about 6 feet of DNA, the DNA has to be tightly folded to fit into the cell. But, what 3D shape is it folded into? What keeps it folded in the right shape - if indeed there is a 'right' shape at all? If so, could 'misfolded' DNA be linked to certain diseases? Job Dekker and Carl Zimmer seem to ask more of these questions than they answer, but it's an interesting chat.

If you want to read further, here's a review (open access) by Job Dekker and Edith Heard that is related to this field: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.08.044/full
This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?

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This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?

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The story behind our recent paper, describing how to move proteins around within a cell using light, now out in the Node.

http://thenode.biologists.com/moving-proteins-within-living-embryos-using-light/resources/

Original paper here: http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

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Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics

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Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics

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Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics

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I'm not sure I'm clever enough to make full use of this, but it looks cool nonetheless! It's a modelling framework that includes typical cell behaviours found in development (apoptosis, migration, etc), so it can be used to simulate any number of developmental processes.

The #opensource software is here http://www.biocenter.helsinki.fi/salazar/software.html

There's a better explanation from the authors on The Node: http://thenode.biologists.com/embryomaker-a-general-modeling-framework-to-simulate-developing-systems-and-perform-experiments-in-silico/resources/

The paper is here: http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/23/bioinformatics.btv527

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I'm not sure I'm clever enough to make full use of this, but it looks cool nonetheless! It's a modelling framework that includes typical cell behaviours found in development (apoptosis, migration, etc), so it can be used to simulate any number of developmental processes.

The #opensource software is here http://www.biocenter.helsinki.fi/salazar/software.html

There's a better explanation from the authors on The Node: http://thenode.biologists.com/embryomaker-a-general-modeling-framework-to-simulate-developing-systems-and-perform-experiments-in-silico/resources/

The paper is here: http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/23/bioinformatics.btv527
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