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Rachel Moore
Works at King's College London
Attended University College London
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Rachel Moore

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Congrats to Elena Scarpa, my old colleague from the Mayor lab at UCL, who I have just realised won the Beddington medal at the 2016 BSDB meeting! Here's an interview with her first published on The Node.
Every year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. The 2016 awar
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Rachel Moore

Popular Science  - 
 
When every cell in your body has about 6 feet of DNA, the DNA has to be tightly folded to fit into the cell. But, what 3D shape is it folded into? What keeps it folded in the right shape - if indeed there is a 'right' shape at all? If so, could 'misfolded' DNA be linked to certain diseases? Job Dekker and Carl Zimmer seem to ask more of these questions than they answer, but it's an interesting chat.

If you want to read further, here's a review (open access) by Job Dekker and Edith Heard that is related to this field: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.08.044/full
 
This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?
The reality is far messier than an abstract spiral staircase. Scientists are learning fascinating new things about how DNA is really shaped.
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The concept of "misfolded" DNA at the tertiary or quartenary level is unusual. I wouldn't have thought there was a  unique way that the DNA/histone complex is packaged beyond nucleosomes, rather that the packaging would change depending on what is being transcribed or epigenetically modified. Quite fascinating. 
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The story behind our recent paper, describing how to move proteins around within a cell using light, now out in the Node.

http://thenode.biologists.com/moving-proteins-within-living-embryos-using-light/resources/

Original paper here: http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0
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Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics
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Rachel Moore

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Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics
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Rachel Moore

Popular Science  - 
 
I'm not sure I'm clever enough to make full use of this, but it looks cool nonetheless! It's a modelling framework that includes typical cell behaviours found in development (apoptosis, migration, etc), so it can be used to simulate any number of developmental processes.

The #opensource software is here http://www.biocenter.helsinki.fi/salazar/software.html

There's a better explanation from the authors on The Node: http://thenode.biologists.com/embryomaker-a-general-modeling-framework-to-simulate-developing-systems-and-perform-experiments-in-silico/resources/

The paper is here: http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/23/bioinformatics.btv527
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+Robert Woodman why are all of your posts about minmaxing social networking and monetizing blogs
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Rachel Moore

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An oldie but a goodie - using #zebrafish as a model organism. The fact that they lay transparent eggs makes them particularly useful, as we can watch development occur without disturbing it in any way.

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/thecure/2014/06/zebrafish-primer-201462122014833879.html
How Danio rerio has become an invaluable aid in the study of human disease.
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Rachel Moore

• Biology  - 
 
When every cell in your body has about 6 feet of DNA, the DNA has to be tightly folded to fit into the cell. But, what 3D shape is it folded into? What keeps it folded in the right shape - if indeed there is a 'right' shape at all? If so, could 'misfolded' DNA be linked to certain diseases? Job Dekker and Carl Zimmer seem to ask more of these questions than they answer, but it's an interesting chat.

If you want to read further, here's a review (open access) by Job Dekker and Edith Heard that is related to this field: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.08.044/full
 
This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?
The reality is far messier than an abstract spiral staircase. Scientists are learning fascinating new things about how DNA is really shaped.
1 comment on original post
41
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No doubt at all what we've been taught has been wrong. The Double Helix by Crick/Watson was only a simplfied model for the average person to understand something incredibly amazing that cannot be seen. I love the GIF. It makes me think of the incredible mechanisms of epigenetics working at faster than supercomputer speeds. Of course even the GIF itself is slowed way down otherwise we could grasp what was going on. Thanks for posting this.
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Rachel Moore

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This is pretty cool! When every cell in your body has 6 feet of DNA, how does the DNA fit in the cell?
The reality is far messier than an abstract spiral staircase. Scientists are learning fascinating new things about how DNA is really shaped.
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It's amazing to realize that probably in the far future, humans will be able to change the nucleotide order to allow humans to maintain some developmental stage for thousands of years- without progressing farther into the typical changes that occur in old age. For all we know we are in the last few thousand generations of humans that only live for under 100 years :(
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Rachel Moore

• Biology  - 
 
 
Here in the Clarke lab at KCL we've recently published a paper explaining how we can move proteins around a cell using different wavelengths of light. This technique has actually been used in cultured cells before, but we were able to use it in developing zebrafish embryos. The technique is quick and is also reversible, which (we hope!) will make it a good resource for many labs in different fields.

Here's the rundown on the KCL news page:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/depts/devneuro/newsevents/newsrecords/2016/January/Clarke.aspx

And here's the original paper:
http://www.cell.com/developmental-cell/abstract/S1534-5807%2815%2900796-0

#openaccess #developmentalbiology #optogenetics
View original post
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Add a comment...

Rachel Moore

• Biology  - 
 
I'm not sure I'm clever enough to make full use of this, but it looks cool nonetheless! It's a modelling framework that includes typical cell behaviours found in development (apoptosis, migration, etc), so it can be used to simulate any number of developmental processes.

The #opensource software is here http://www.biocenter.helsinki.fi/salazar/software.html

There's a better explanation from the authors on The Node: http://thenode.biologists.com/embryomaker-a-general-modeling-framework-to-simulate-developing-systems-and-perform-experiments-in-silico/resources/

The paper is here: http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/23/bioinformatics.btv527
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Very cool indeed!
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Rachel Moore

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm not sure I'm clever enough to make full use of this, but it looks cool nonetheless! It's a modelling framework that includes typical cell behaviours found in development (apoptosis, migration, etc), so it can be used to simulate any number of developmental processes.

The #opensource software is here http://www.biocenter.helsinki.fi/salazar/software.html

There's a better explanation from the authors on The Node: http://thenode.biologists.com/embryomaker-a-general-modeling-framework-to-simulate-developing-systems-and-perform-experiments-in-silico/resources/

The paper is here: http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/23/bioinformatics.btv527
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Have them in circles
181 people
Omar Loisel's profile photo
Mason Yeh's profile photo
Steve Neubeck's profile photo
Sakis Koukouvis's profile photo
Linda Gaines's profile photo
Shehzada Kashif's profile photo
MOUHAMADOU LAMINE KANE's profile photo
Kevin Franck's profile photo
Damien Hudson's profile photo
Education
  • University College London
    PhD, Cell and Developemental Biology
  • University of Melbourne
    Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Honours), Diploma of Modern Languages (German)
Story
Introduction
How do you make a multi-cellular organism out of a single cell?  I'm interested in how cells communicate with each other during development.  Currently looking at neurogenesis in zebrafish.
Work
Occupation
Scientist
Employment
  • King's College London
    Research Associate, 2014 - present
Rachel Moore's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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