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Sinclair DNA
41 followers -
The St Clair / Sinclair DNA study welcomes all family members and others who love genealogy and the history of the families of France, England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Follow us as we use DNA to trace the history of our St Clair / Sinclair Family.
The St Clair / Sinclair DNA study welcomes all family members and others who love genealogy and the history of the families of France, England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland. Follow us as we use DNA to trace the history of our St Clair / Sinclair Family.

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Sinclair DNA has connections to the Redvers family via the Moreville family. Not yet proven Y-DNA connections, but rather they were benefactors to the same priories and abbeys. Baldwin de Redvers founded Quarr Abbey (pronounced "Kor") on the Isle of Wight in 1132 as a Cistercian house.

(photo - "Quarr Abbey c1910 - Project Gutenberg eText 17296". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Quarr_Abbey_c1910_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_17296.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Quarr_Abbey_c1910_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_17296.jpg)
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Master Wace mentioned a Saint-Cler family member with Hugh de Mortimer at the Battle of Hastings. Other surnames with Mortimer were Auvilliers, and Oubeaux. Lately, I've been looking into Saint-Clair / Auvilliers / Oubeaux connections in medieval priories and abbeys. Sure enough I'm finding them. And sure enough, they point to our proven descendants of Saint-Clair-sur-Elle, in Normandy - our Herdmanston descendants. #SinclairDNA  is slowly proving our real history.
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Please enjoy Mark Sinclair Staveley's story of the Scotch Corners "Scottie Dogs." http://www.stclairresearch.com/content/Sinclairs-of-Scotch-Corners.html
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The latest Sinclair DNA video - identifying a "Super Family" before surnames became fixed. 

Sooner or later, you must embrace that you're stuck in the 1500s or 1600s (or even later) and that you may never get around that brick wall. My own brick wall is in Scotland before 1666.

But, if you find surname matches both in your DNA SNP matches PLUS in medieval records, then you have a very good chance of claiming who your medieval ancestors were. Our Herdmanston Lineage can make such claims. 
#genealogy   #dna   #genetics   #FTDNa   #sinclair   #stclair  

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Brian Dreadon shares his research on the origins of the Sinclairs of Rosslyn. Along the way he corrects some misperceptions about family researchers.

Definition of patience for a family DNA study admin:
1. You've convinced a member of your family in the UK to take the YDNA test.
2. This member's genealogy trail is quite old and well-proven.
3. The 67-marker results are in and show what looks like a definitive match to one of your existing lineages.
4. But you know you must wait on the SNP testing to come in before you make definitive statements.

That's patience, and it's killing me to wait :)

Like many DNA studies, our Sinclair / St Clair / Sinceler DNA study is not getting much participation, if any, from citizens of England or France. So, when I was able to convince a member of our family with a well-traced line to test, I got very excited.

It seemed the more excited I got, the longer the process became. Waiting on the kit to arrive in the UK from FTDNA took a very long time. Waiting on the test subject to return from a trip to the continent took another week. Getting the kit back from the UK to Family Tree DNA's lab took an eternity. 

That last step took so long, I asked FTDNA to send out another kit, which they happily did. The new kit arrived with the test subject the same week that his original kit arrived at FTDNA's lab.

The one part of this process of getting an important Sinclair DNA test completed was the lab work. The recent changes Family Tree DNA made in their lab have been a tremendous change for impatient DNA admins like myself. What used to take months has been so much faster.

Now if we can just the the postal services to speed things up a bit.

Definition of patience for a family DNA study admin:
1. You've convinced a member of your family in the UK to take the YDNA test.
2. This member's genealogy trail is quite old and well-proven.
3. The 67-marker results are in and show what looks like a definitive match to one of your existing lineages.
4. But you know you must wait on the SNP testing to come in before you make definitive statements.

That's patience, and it's killing me to wait :)

Like many DNA studies, our Sinclair / St Clair / Sinceler DNA study is not getting much participation, if any, from citizens of England or France. So, when I was able to convince a member of our family with a well-traced line to test, I got very excited.

It seemed the more excited I got, the longer the process became. Waiting on the kit to arrive in the UK from FTDNA took a very long time. Waiting on the test subject to return from a trip to the continent took another week. Getting the kit back from the UK to Family Tree DNA's lab took an eternity. 

That last step took so long, I asked FTDNA to send out another kit, which they happily did. The new kit arrived with the test subject the same week that his original kit arrived at FTDNA's lab.

The one part of this process of getting an important Sinclair DNA test completed was the lab work. The recent changes Family Tree DNA made in their lab have been a tremendous change for impatient DNA admins like myself. What used to take months has been so much faster.

Now if we can just the the postal services to speed things up a bit.

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Axioms are fun. They all you to find lots of interesting connections. This blog post shows a very interesting one in the Vaux / Vere family - 

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Fans of the show #merlin  will be interested in the history of Pendragon Castle in Mallerstang, Cumbria, England. The castle was built c. 1173 by Ranulph de Meschines. Later Sir Hugh de Morville, Lord of Westmorland owned the castle. Morville was involved in the murder of Thomas Becket. Ranulph de Meschines was part of the land grab of Gilles Bueth. That land became called Gilesland and was owned by Robert de Vaux. He later gave land to the monks of Castle Acre. The Morville family was instrumental to the St. Clair family in Scotland. Learn more about our family at our DNA study website - http://www.stclairresearch.com
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