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Raspberry Pi Colombia
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Raspberry Pi Colombia. Blog, foros, tutoriales videos y mucho mas!
Raspberry Pi Colombia. Blog, foros, tutoriales videos y mucho mas!

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GitPi: A Private Git Server on Raspberry Pi
http://adafru.it/ddY 

Instructables user scottkidall has posted this useful tutorial for nabbing your own private Git server without paying for the private repository service that GitHub offers.

Git is usually used in synchronization with GitHub — the former is a source code management system and the latter is a website where you can share/contribute Git repositories with the larger internet community.

For those wanting to get started with GitHub, I’ve written this Instructable: Introduction to GitHub.

But, what if you want to keep your repositories private? The usual answer is that you have to pay for this service. Boo.

A lot of us have code-in-progress that we want to properly put onto the Git system, but ins’t ready for public consumption. Nor do we want to pay for the service of private hosting.

However, using the Raspberry Pi, you can set up your own Git server on your home network.

This Instructable will cover setting up your Raspberry Pi as a Git server with repositories saved onto an external USB thumb drive. My example uses the Mac OS, but can be extended to other platforms as well.

Read morehttp://adafru.it/ddY #piday #raspberrypi
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Originally shared by ****
Pi powered joke machine

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Howto make Raspberry Pi a reliable server system!

Since i'm driving some bigger ARM clusters, i would like to share some of my observations:

Most SD cards suffer extremely low performance at random writes. Despite being fast at sequential writes, what is mostly tested and advertised, they slow down ext2/3/4 filesystem, because UNIX filesystems, formerly optimized for magnetic harddrives, typically have multiple file allocation tables (called super blocks) every 20-50 cylinders to minimize head movements. MS FAT/FAT32/exFAT only has one FAT, which, for SD cards even is better, since there are no longer many superblocks, that have to be kept in sync.

Flash extremely suffers writes, expecially when the OS keeps on overwriting fat again and again. Typically, after 2000-3000 (10000 for special types) writes into the same flash cell, the cell dies and has to be marked as "dead". For this not to happen, they invented (patented!) "wear leveling". This is like a caterpillar drive chain, continuously rolling over the flash storage - so that the driver, continuously spitting onto the drive chain, almost never hits the same tile twice. This way, flash has become extremely durable. But only as long as you leave enough free space on your storage.

When SD gets full, wear leveling simply doesn't work any longer, extremely reducing SD lifetime.

For this not to happen, Samsung invented F2FS filesystem. This comes with newer Linux kernels 3.13 upwards. The core trick is, when a database writes again and again into the same file at the same place, the new data is just appended at the end of that file, together with a (negative) pointer, where this data has to be inserted into that file. When enough changes have been appended at the end of that file, the complete file is rewritten with its correct replacements.

F2FS so replaces many overwrites by just appends and only updates (writes) onto SD, when it is really neccessary. So lifetime of SDs extremely is prolonged.

Since using F2FS on my machines, even SD cards without internal wear leveling seem to live forever. Nevertheless i noticed, that my ARM machines felt being a bit slow. Looking at http://www.chip.de/bestenlisten/Bestenliste-SD-Karten--index/extended/id/802/ (german, sorry!) SanDisk Extreme Pro, with capacities bigger than 32GB, seemed to be much faster at random writes ("Schreiben: mittlere Zugriffszeit").

So i simply replaced my standard SDs in my RPis, from which i thought they would be fast, by tested SanDisks with extremely high random write rate and - of course - F2FS. Suddenly my RPis began to fly and behave like really, really fast servers, being able to easily saturate 100MBit with NginX or L-WAN ( http://lwan.ws/ ). Additionally, temporarily switching off any logging, e.g. syslogd (kill command), this thing again became a bit faster.

Have fun!
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Aprenda a crear una copia de seguridad de su tarjeta SD, no pierda todo sus largas horas de trabajo por un simple error. En este tutorial le mostramos como lo pueden hacer. http://goo.gl/LwK9mT
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Feliz navidad y prospero 2014 para todos nuestros seguidores y sus familias!
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