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"The Great Human Odyssey" airs tonight at 8pm EST on CBC's "The Nature of Things" After 3 years in the making, it is finally time to check out the show that took SkyMotion Video around the world. Enjoy!
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https://vimeo.com/94187095

After coming back from Dubai, SkyMotion Video was proud to be selected again by Nova Film for creating the winter edition of the tourism campaign for Charlevoix in Quebec. As one of the most beautiful regions in the province, Charlevoix has so much to offer in terms of winter activities and Nova Film wasn’t short on ideas: skiers skiing down slopes while admiring the gorgeous view of the St-Lawrence river, sea kayaking in between the ice, snowmobiling over fresh fallen snow, skating over a beautiful frozen lake, ice climbing, snowshoeing and helicopter tours, so much to do and what a film shoot!
 
The winter video campaign will not be out until the next winter season, but we have access to their summer campaign we were part of last summer! Providing most of the drone-based aerial cinematography, we achieved spectacular shots of cyclists along the edge of the St-Lawrence River. The aerials were used to showcase the quaint landscapes of the region, such as a barn surrounded by rolling hills, and an intimate view of the sunrise while our octocopter system coasts only a few feet above the water. Additionally, Nova Film made sure that we covered many of the interesting amenities that Charlevoix has to offer, like the beautiful casino, golf course and the Manoir Richelieu hotel at the edge of the St-Lawrence River.
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In March 2014, the SkyMotion Video team prepared themselves for their last location shoot with Clearwater Documentaries, for their three part documentary project: “The Great Human Odyssey” (previously titled “Human: Miracle of a Species”). For this last shoot, Niobe Thompson (producer/director), Gabrielle Nadeau (remote camera operator) and Chuck Taylor (drone pilot / UAV operator) hopped on a flight for Dubai in the United Arab Emirates.
 
Because of the very small crew, and the very short window of time (only three filming days), the team had to be quite multitasking. Chuck Taylor, with his experience as a cinematographer provided on-the-ground camera operating with the Sony F55 - filming documentary style interviews, B-roll, and the archaeological site, which was the focus of the segment. Meanwhile, Gabie Nadeau continued to take care of the sound recording. Afterwards of course, the SkyMotion Video team provided some beautiful aerial scenic shots of the archeological site where the story took place, as well as stunning shots of the Arabian Desert. As for extra B-roll, the SkyMotion Video team got crafty using their MOVI in handheld mode for slow motion dolly shots of sand flying off the golden dunes. This production started off in the freezing Siberian Arctic, and so it was a fitting end to finish in the blistering Arabian Desert. Keep your eyes peeled for “The Great Human Odyssey” in 2015!
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Aerial Video in Kenya

In January 2014, SkyMotion Video was sent to the Great Rift Valley in Kenya to capture some ultraHD aerial video for the upcoming CBC documentary series, "Human Odyssey". Time was limited to only three days for this shoot, so quick planning was essential to make the shoot at the site a success.
 
The primary reason for the Kenya trip is that the Great Rift Valley is often referred to as the place where modern humans originated, and it is thought by some that it was from here that humans spread out to dominate the rest of the planet.
 
The importance of capturing aerial cinematography with the drone was two-fold at this location. First, it was necessary to gather dynamic moving imagery of the otherwise motionless archeological site and sediment layering - providing a sense of depth to the landscape. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the octocopter was an imperative tool to provide high impact introductory shots of the landscape; the site of origin of the modern human, and the beginning of our story as a species.
 
The experience of the SkyMotion Video team within film and video production allowed the production to keep the crew size smaller. Drone pilot Chuck Taylor would operate a second camera throughout the interviews between director Niobe Thompson, and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts, while remote MOVI operator Gabrielle Nadeau would take care of all sound recording. This on set experience allowed the small crew to work efficiently to gather all the material needed for the scenes within the small time frame.

On the last night, after having a successful shoot at the archaeological site, the crew went to the nearby Maasai village. Although not the primary goal for the trip to Kenya, the Maasai village offered a glimpse of traditional people who are still able to hold onto their culture and ways of life. All the shooting in the village was done with a single Sony F55 camera by director of photography Daron Donahue. Gabrielle continued to provide support as the sound recordist, while Chuck was free to take photos of the Maasai people. As the sun got low on the horizon, and the beautiful light fell on the village, it made for a remarkable last night in Kenya. Enjoy here a selection of some of our favorite photos from the evening, and the rest of the journey.
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It has been awhile since our last update regarding our work in Papua New Guinea, and as we are now on a little holiday break, we thought we'd take the time to share with you some stories of our adventures in South Africa and Namibia where our drone aerial video cinematography, and new MOVI M10 stabilized handheld service were used extensively for both dramatic recreations of early humans and for dynamically capturing the contemporary scenes of humans which still rely heavily on the land and the skills passed on from generation to generation for thousands of years.

Our adventures here in Africa began with recreations of early humans travelling through a world which has undergone huge climatic changes, and rendered the landscape dry and desolate. The production hired a family of bushman from northern South Africa - near Upington, to play the part of these early humans. The bushman have the oldest gene signature of any humans on the planet and so most accurately represents what we as a species looked like thousands of years ago. To transition from semi-dry desert to complete desolation, the shoot took place in a number of locations including !Xaus Lodge in Mier South Africa, to an area near Aus in Namibia which is renowned for its endless vivid red sand dunes. All of this travelling happened by road and made for one amazing road trip. To get a sense of the distances travelled check out the maps attached.

Our next set of recreations took place in Simon's Town, South Africa. Here we filmed a group acting as early humans who lived off the sea. It is believed by some scientists that a seafood rich diet supplied early humans with the fats necessary for our brains to evolve into the complex system it now is. To document the science behind these ideas we also visited 'Blombos Cave' an important and still active archaeological site located on the southern coast of South Africa, and home to some of the most impressive archaeological finds.

Simon's Town proved to be a real challenge for the team as the summer winds were pounding the town both day and night, which grounded the drone aerial video system for about four days. Winds reached 50-60 km/h and did not die down throughout all hours of the day. During these days of wind, the MOVI came out to capture the more intimate close-ups and some smooth dolly work along the coast. When we first pulled the MOVI out of the case and took it into the pounding winds, we were certain that the results would be rubbish. However, much to our surprise, it still offered amazing results. The biggest shake noticed was when the wind pushed the operator around causing a speed increase in any direction. Even though we do not believe steadicam is dead, we must say that the MOVI with the RED Epic mounted, handled these extreme winds better than any steadicam ever could. On the fourth day we were able to get the octocopter flying again, and in just a few short flights captured breath-taking and elegant shots of the actors as they recreated early life on the sea.

Attached to this post are a few more photos captured during a few shorter shoots throughout the road trip. These include some cave painting areas near Bushmans Kloof in South Africa, some aerial video shooting along the southern coast where bright white sand dunes meet the sea, some tracking shots done from vehicle to vehicle in Namibia, and of course to sum up any set of road trip photos - the rental van complete with blown out window and ruptured tire. :)

Although the show's focus is on early humans, we can't help but take some photos of the amazing wildlife found in southern Africa. Be sure to check those out as well.

Lastly, we finished this section of the journey by taking a chartered flight to an extremely remote location northeast of Windhoek, Namibia (See map). Here the shooting focused on the contemporary lives of bushmen today. Because of its location, far into the desert, this community was only discovered in 1958, and they still live a hunting-gathering lifestyle. They live in grass huts, and we got to learn how they hunt for porcupine, how they make their crafts such as beads out of ostrich eggs and bows and arrows. We learned how they go about collecting poison from the larva of a beetle for their arrows and how if you are lost in the desert, there are these plants that look like a small weed above ground, but when you dig it out of the ground it has a root the size of a pumpkin! This root produces bitter water to drink - tastes like what you imagine potato juice would taste like - but it could save your life.

Here we focused mostly on day to day life. Because the grass huts are small short dwellings, the MOVI proved to be more useful handheld than in the aerial configuration for this portion. For example, one night the elders performed a 'trance dance' - a dance where they alter their consciousness in such a way that allows them to heal the sick, ask for rain, or perform any other task which requires the help of higher power. With the RED Epic mounted on the Movi, it became possible to dance along with them - moving freely in and out of the group, under outstretched arms, and circling around from both high and low to capture the real feeling of being part of the ceremony. This was an extraordinary experience for us. The bushmen culture is rapidly disappearing, and it will not be long before it is completely gone. It was a real honour to witness these people with our own eyes.

We've done our best to keep the writing short, and let the pictures speak for themselves. We look forward to sharing more news again soon of our continuing adventures around the world.
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Here we have some test footage from our new gimbal, the Movi M10 / MR. There has been NO POST-STABILIZATION applied to the video. Other than a very light colour correct, this is exactly as the footage came from the camera.

https://vimeo.com/76790109

Camera flown for this test was the RED Epic shooting at 5K resolution with a 24mm lens.
 
In the video, there is one shot which is much longer than the others. We wanted to illustrate how effective the aerial system is at achieving very different looks within the same flight. We start high above our model and follow behind her as she walks down a path. At the end, the system comes down to a head-height altitude, and we perform a long lasting dolly shot back in the other direction.
 
As you can see from the test, stabilization has been improved immensely, and is proving effective for flights going both up and down in altitude. Additionally, the Movi M10/MR camera gimbal offers better easing in and out of pans and tilts, and feels much more organic than mechanical.
 
We look forward to flying the RED Epic with our new Movi brushless gimbal throughout the next few months of international shooting.
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Beautiful smooth shots
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In May of 2013, SkyMotion Video was sent to Brazil for three weeks to shoot with one of (if not the) most respected natural history organizations in the world - the Natural History Unit of the BBC. The NHU at the BBC is responsible for such global sensations as Planet Earth, Human Planet, and Frozen Planet. Producers at the BBC were looking for a fresh new way to make the landscapes come alive on screen, and began investigating the use of remote controlled helicopters or ‘drones’ for this purpose. After checking out a number of companies from around the world, they decided to approach Canada-based SkyMotion Video for their project.
 
The challenge in the past has been transitioning smoothly from shots on the ground to high angles from a helicopter equipped with a Cineflex. In the past the BBC employed jibs, cable dollies, and other methods for getting the cameras to start with a low intimate shot, before rising up to a higher vantage point with the intention of cutting to an aerial. What they quickly realized with SkyMotion Video’s aerial system was that now, the shots can start close to the subject, float up higher and higher, and get the aerial shot that the cineflex would have done. This made for a perfect way to cut to any other cineflex material already shot, plus as an added bonus, SkyMotion Video was flying their RED Epic camera, which would cut in seamlessly with the rest of the show being shot on RED.
 
It is no mistake that the NHU at the BBC is seen by the international community as some of the best filmmakers in the world. The approach taken on set was professional, deliberate, and well thought out. Despite having this new toy at their disposal, capable of shots unlike anything done before, story and elegance always took precedent over a ‘cool shot’ for the sake of it. It was an absolute privilege to be part of such an amazing project. Watch out for ‘Wild Brazil’ in 2014. Also make sure to watch the behind the scenes portion at the end of the episodes which will surely feature SkyMotion Video on location.
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Awesome technology! Love the logo, too! :)
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BBC Wild life in the Bahamas

Once again the BBC Natural History Unit selected SkyMotion Video as their aerial video drone team to provide them with new interesting dynamic shots of nature.  There were two different upcoming BBC series, which both required on location filming within the Bahamas. Although the locations were similar, each show had it’s own unique set of ‘characters’. While one focused on the local shark population, the other program was working on a sequence relating to the dolphins in the area.
 
Filming wildlife definitely comes with its challenges, and maybe that’s why there is such a rewarding feeling when it all comes together. The need to find the animal every day and then wishing to have the chance to film good behavior, in good weather, with good light, during good tides, in similar water color and visibility, all with a flying moving camera! The other main challenge of course, with filming wild life, is that you can never know how the animals will react to a drone, or any camera for that matters. The type of animal, as well as the age, plays a factor in the way we approach an animal, or if filming in close proximity with an drone system is even a viable option. On the technical side, it also means our team needs to work at sea, taking off and landing on boats of various sizes and making sure everything stays dry! We ended up being incredibly lucky to have had the chance to encounter some very cooperative animals in all the right conditions. We are glad to say that we captured some wonderful topside footage, while the rest of the BBC team captured amazing intimate underwater cinematography.
 
We can’t wait to see the sequence put together, but alas once again we will have to wait until 2015 :)
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In February of 2014, the SkyMotion Video drone team was moved from severely dry deserts in Africa, to lush tropical islands in the southern Philippines and Palau. The island area of Tawi-Tawi in the Philippines (near the border of Malaysia) where the aerial drone filming was to be done, presented some additional logistical challenges which had to be overcome by the production company Clearwater Media. The main concern is that this region of the Philippines is known as a real hotspot for kidnapping - especially of Caucasian visitors. There have been many people taken away at gunpoint in order to be sold off for ransom at the best of times. In order to eliminate the risks involved in filming in such a danger zone, the production company alongside local officials worked it out to have both a team of Marines, and Navy Seals protecting us from danger around the clock. No crew member could walk or be driven anywhere without armed escorts. The military personnel assigned to us were absolute pros, and cleared the way for us so that we could work safely, capturing the beautiful images to tell the story we were there to document.

The primary reason for coming into this danger zone to film was to work with the Bajau community. The Bajau people are particularly special as they are one of the last surviving traditional free diving communities on the planet. Originally living on the open sea, most have moved to land to build their houses. However, as they owned no land, they built their villages on stilts above the water in shallower areas. Filming with the RED Epic to capture incredible aerial views of the village was a real treat as the bird's eye view quickly revealed the intricacy and shear beauty of their construction. These people are clearly at one with the sea, and they truly were the ideal subjects for exemplifying how humans may have lived and evolved along coastal environments.

As large sequences of the shoot were also done underwater to show off the extraordinary talents of these free divers, it allowed for us to have a bit more free time than usual to explore the village we were visiting. The people living there were healthy, kind, and showed no signs of worry. People would let us pass through their homes freely if it made for a good shortcut. Sometimes this was done out of necessity as the walkways are nothing more than random worn out boards loosely nailed to wobbly posts.

With two full days to film in the village, the shooting was a huge success. SkyMotion Video took care of capturing both the aerial video with the octocopter drone, as well as shooting on the ground with the MOVI brushless camera gimbal. Meanwhile, accomplished underwater cinematographer Adam Ravetch, filmed with another RED Epic to capture the Bajau at home in their underwater environment - often holding their breath at great depths for five minutes. The MOVI proved to be a very useful tool for capturing elegant dolly moves close to the water's surface. By hand-holding the camera gimbal from a small boat, while someone wading through the water simply pushed it, beautiful shots could be achieved while passing underneath the stilted houses. Even though the little boat would wobble back and forth, the MOVI M10 held the horizon solid.

Of course, one of the obvious benefits of being in a warm tropical environment out at sea is that you are constantly surrounded by beautiful clear blue waters sitting at 26°C or more. So when time permitted in the busy schedule, we were just minutes away from a quick scuba dive amongst the beautiful coral reefs.

One of the last locations we filmed at in Tawi-Tawi, was a very unique market. This market is one of the last of its kind in which absolutely no money is exchanged. Everything is done through the trading of physical goods. The Bajau bring in their boats of seafood they have hunted, while people living inland bring in the fruits of their crops. This way, the farmers can trade for food from the sea, while the Bajau can trade for food from the land, and the two communities can diversify their diets. Here, once again the MOVI M10 and RED Epic were used on the ground to get intimate dolly moves throughout the market, as well as taken airborne on the remote-controlled drone to get the high-angle aerial views of the trading in progress. The Marines were exceptionally helpful with clearing the way for take-off and landing zones, as the locals were naturally very curious in the flying machine they had never seen before.

After the Philippines, the team flew to Palau - a small island country in the South Pacific Ocean. The goal here was to document a team which is still able to sail boats using traditional methods and without the use of instrumentation. In other words by relying on stars, current, saltiness of water, etc. Unfortunately, after such a successful shooting experience in the Philippines, the production was heavily disappointed with the Palau shoot. Despite over a year of preparation and planning, there was no way to anticipate the disaster which awaited them. Untold to anyone was the fact that the sailboat was not ready. Upon arrival the first day, the central mast was sitting on the ground near the dock and not even on the boat. That evening, the boat crew worked hard to get the mast up. The following day, the boat was taken out to sea so that we could film. We managed one flight with the aerial video drone to follow along as the sail was raised, but had to promptly land as the real problem revealed itself. The mast simply could not support the sail, and immediately bent into a dangerous 'C' shape. The short story is, "No mast = No Sailing". Time was limited to three days of shooting, and with one lost to weather, and another lost to a malfunctioning mast, the shoot was more or less a bust. We continued to film what we could, but already show producer/director, Niobe Thompson, has come up with an alternative filming plan in another part of the world to tell this important part of the story. As this was the last location in a long line of travels, Chuck Taylor and Gabrielle Nadeau of SkyMotion Video, took a few extra days for themselves in Palau to scuba dive in one of the most beautiful underwater environments on the plant.

By far our favorite dive was in Palau's "Jellyfish Lake". If you are ever in that corner of the world, do yourself a favour and go and see this remarkable and rare lake filled with millions of jellyfish which have lost their stinging ability. You will not be disappointed!
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During our hiatus from the CBC three-part documentary which has been keeping us busy over the past few months, we were asked if we could squeeze in a quick trip to Bodh Gaya, India. This made for a couple 'firsts' for us at SkyMotion Video - our first time filming in India, and our first time capturing aerials with the new RED EPIC Dragon 6K camera with carbon fiber body and carbon fiber SSD side module. The camera came courtesy of Blackwood Cinema.

The film "Thongdrol" will be:
"A visually stunning feature length theatrical documentary on the creation and practice of Tibetan sacred art as it developed through the history of the Karmapas and the Karma Kagyu branch of Tibetan Buddhism."

Bodh Gaya is the where the Mahabodhi Temple is situated, which marks the site where the Buddha is said to have obtained enlightenment. Next to the temple is the holy Bodhi Tree - it is under this tree which still stands today that the Buddha had meditated for the three nights before reaching this enlightenment in 534 BC. It is for this reason that Bodh Gaya is the most important pilgrimmage for Buddhists. Because of this, as well as the presence of the Karmapa, along with the many beautiful artworks and buildings in the region that the film began its shooting at this breathtaking location.

Director David Cherniack and DOP Kris Belchevski wanted to capture many of the images for the show during pre-dawn, and at sunset. Because of this, the RED EPIC Dragon proved to be an invaluable asset. The camera's ability to operate in low-light situations is incredible, and delivers very clean results in even the most demanding situations. Additionally, the carbon fiber body, and the carbon fiber side SSD module drops an entire pound of weight off the camera brain. This opened the doors to more lens options without maxing out the recommended weight limit of 10 lbs for the MOVI M10.

Belchevski brought along an additional MOVI to the shoot allowing two stabilized cameras to be working at the same time - Belchevski on the ground performing intimate following shots as hundreds of monks walked in meditation, and the remote controlled octocopter drone in the air capturing aerials to show off the shear scale of the events.

As you'll see from the accompanying images, Bodh Gaya is a chaotic place where almost anything can happen. The streets are filled with cars, rickshaws, bikes, pedestrians, dogs, cows, and goats. And watch out where you step - it's not just animal poop you will find at the side of the road. :) As David the director said, "You will see more life in five minutes out on the streets here, than you will in an entire year back in Canada'. Very true indeed. Beautiful, ugly, and everything inbetween can be seen in such a short time that it boggles the mind.

We wish to express a warm thanks to the rest of the crew involved in the making of "Thongdrol". We had an amazing time!
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Thank you Aazai!
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We have just successfully finished our trip to Papua New Guinea, and are now resting comfortably in beautiful Cape Town, South Africa as we prepare for the next leg of our journey. While we get the rest our bodies are craving, and while the communications available to us are good, we thought we’d take the time to share with all of you a bit of our experiences from the single most memorable shoot of our lives.
 
Firstly, the intention of this trip was to document the native people in PNG with a focus on their close relationship with water, and their innate resilience to many diseases (such as malaria), which would kill most of us.
 
To start our journey, we took a few flights to get to Wewak, PNG. From here we drove for 4 hours to a village on the edge of the legendary Sepik River, where we boarded dugout canoes. After a 2-hour ride down the Sepik, we came to the beginning of a trail where we began a 2-hour hike into the jungle with all our gear. Fortunately, the village we were headed to sent all the men to help us carry the gear down the path. This is where we met the first group we were to document. They arrived in bare feet, and armed with machetes. To carry the heavy cases they promptly hacked down some small trees, then used bark to quickly fashion ropes to tie the trees (now poles) to the cases, so that two people could comfortably carry the weight through the jungle.
 
As we made our way down the path, the village slowly materialized one grass hut at a time. The villagers came out to the pathway and welcomed us all along our way. Finally, we got to the bamboo and grass hut we would be calling home for the next few nights, surrounded by children, men, and women, wishing us a very warm welcome. We had officially arrived in ‘Yamok’ village.
 
The reason for our going to Yamok was to document a coming of age ceremony that occurs once every 6-8 years. The ceremony involves the scarification of the boys, so that their bodies will resemble crocodiles. The cutting part of the ritual takes place in the Spirit House, where outsiders, women, and children are not allowed – only initiated men. As many of our followers know, our main camera / Movi operator is Gabrielle Nadeau – a woman. The production had managed to achieve access unlike ever before in order to get our cameras in there during the cutting, but Gabrielle still had to undergo some extra steps to be allowed in. This came in the form of an offering ceremony in which she had to give a betel nut branch to the village chief. This was preceded with the slaughtering of a pig with the use of a spear. With the village chief’s approval, we were all set to document this fascinating ritual.
 
The ritual began with the initiated men dancing in and outside the Spirit House area. They began around 3 o’clock in the afternoon, and continued this all through the night until dawn the following day. This presented us with a great opportunity to obtain some incredible aerial images using the octocopter, the Movi brushless gimbal, and the RED Epic. From above we were able to move along with them as they passed from inside the Spirit House perimeter, to the outside, and then lower altitude to an elegant dolly alongside the entire tribe. Although the remote controlled aerial system was completely foreign technology to them, they were so happy to experience it airborne and to see the images we were capable of achieving with them. A funny thing happened during this part of the filming where one of the men near the monitor where Gabrielle was remotely operating the Movi from began to get quite upset. Thinking it had something to do with the drone’s filming, Gabrielle had the system pilot, Chuck, perform an immediate landing. It turned out that the man was not upset with the system or the images, but rather that the children and women were too close to the screen. Being near the screen, they were able to see inside the Spirit House perimeter, which is off-limits to them, and is a taboo. And so, several men created a wall with their bodies around Gabrielle and her ground station, so that we could continue our work.
 
We went to sleep that night under our bug nets listening to the chanting and dancing as it went all night long. In the morning, the boys were brought inside the perimeter, and the cutting ceremony began. Instead of flying the octocopter during the cutting (which we were concerned would blow dust into the cuts), we converted the Movi M10 to handheld mode and were able to achieve closer, more intimate, dolly and jib styled shots. The cutting was done with razor blades, and happens on the front torso, back torso, and legs of the boys. We cannot begin to imagine the level of pain experienced during the process. However, they take absolute pride in the initiation, and no yells of pain are emitted by any of them. They now heal for 3 months inside the Spirit House under the supervision of the men. During this time, they will also learn the essential skills they need to have as men – how to build a house, gardening, finding a wife, etc.
 
We left Yamok feeling different ourselves, having experienced such an amazing ritual – a ritual performed with an astonishing level of pride and importance.

After more hiking, boating, a small chartered flight, and more boating, we arrived in an even more remote village called ‘Nin’ (pronounced Nine) This place had not had a visitor since 1996 when a missionary came and built a school. It was good that he did that, because that is where they had us sleep ☺. The focus here was on day-to-day village life, as well as their resilience to disease. As for low level aerial cinematography, we managed some really elegant shots of villagers paddling dugout canoes in the river, using the river for household chores and cleaning, boys climbing trees for coconuts, and wonderful landscapes to show off the breath-taking virgin rain forest in the area. The shoot was relatively straight forward, but offered us a glimpse into the everyday lives of these people living completely off the grid and far away from any communications.
 
Finally, after some more boating and flying, we crossed the country to Alotau to take advantage of a traditional boating festival in order to document the sort of boats that could have been used in our ancestors’ history as humans made their way to various parts of the planet. It was here that the new Movi camera gimbal really shone. In the past, when post-stabilization was part of the process, it became difficult getting shots over open water without the horizon showing because it would make tracking virtually impossible. However, now with the Movi brushless gimbal on our octocopter, and with no need to post-stabilize the footage from the RED Epic, we were able to do complicated movements that would have been impossible otherwise, or offered mixed results. We nailed some impressive flights at this final PNG location, and it was a real thrill to hear over the headset, the director at the ground station monitor yelling, “Yes!,” and knowing that what he was seeing was the actual shot as it will exist, straight from the camera. As the director said when we were packing up all the kit to get ready for South Africa, “We achieved 100% of what we set out to do in Papua New Guinea.” Not bad considering it was one of the harshest environments on our list of places for these upcoming shoots.
 
I am sorry for the long posting here, but Papua New Guinea was quite literally the most amazing shooting experience we’ve had so far. We are proud to have been part of this shoot, and thrilled to be leaving with stunning aerial footage unlike anything else. Look forward to our upcoming stories from here in South Africa and Namibia.
 
Warmly,
- SkyMotion Video
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Earlier last week we received our new MōVI M10 / MR camera gimbal kit. To those unfamiliar with the new system, it is essentially a state-of-the-art camera stabilization system which uses custom brushless motors in conjunction with a high performance IMU, gyro sensors, accelorometers, and GPS to quickly correct unwanted camera movement and keep the image perfectly smooth and completely rock solid.
 
We are excited by the new possibilities this gimbal will offer to our clients including; longer lenses, a wider variety of camera types, smoother pans and tilts with better easing in and out options, and new camera movements - all without the need for post stabilization. The MōVI can either be flown on our remote controlled aerial multicopters, or used handheld - replacing the need for steadicam. We have begun tests with the MōVI M10 along with our in house RED Epic camera kit, and the results have been stunning. Even when running full speed with the system in hand, the image does not waver. We will be completing more thorough tests over the weeks to come and look forward to sharing everything the MōVI M10/MR has to offer with you.
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Providing professional remote-controlled aerial cinematography services, and drone rentals world-wide.
Introduction
Specializing in low-altitude aerial cinematography for film and television, SkyMotion Video captures dynamic images at angles previously thought impossible. 

With our in-house 6K capable RED Epic Dragon camera package for video, and our respected 22.3 megapixel Canon 5D Mark III for still photography, SkyMotion Video provides some of the highest resolutions for aerial cinematography and photography at the professional level. 

With a combined 20 years of experience in film and television production, and by making use of the latest rock-solid, remote controlled UAS technologies, the SkyMotion Video team is able to capture breath-taking images. With the ability to both mimic traditional shooting platforms as well as 'go beyond the crane', SkyMotion Video gives directors, producers, and DOPs complete creative freedom on set. 

SkyMotion Video systems are completely state-of-the-art and includes the MōVI M10 and M15 camera gimbal, specifically for rock solid aerial video applications without required post-stabilization. An uncompressed full-HD video signal is transmitted to the ground, offering real-time wireless HD with unprecedented range. In the air and on the ground, our components are revolutionary - streamlining the shooting process to save your production both time and money.